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50 crows found dead in Tokyo park

33 Comments

About 50 crows were found dead in a park in Tokyo on Friday afternoon, police said Saturday.

According to police, a woman walking her dog in Johoku Chuo Park, which is located in both Nerima and Itabashi wards, went to the park administration office to report that she had seen a crow die after eating what looked like a piece of bread. Park officials subsequently found about 50 crows lying dead within 40 meters of each other in the park, Fuji TV reported.

No bread or any other food scraps were found near the crows' bodies. Police said health officials will examine the contents of the birds' stomachs to find out if they were poisoned.

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33 Comments
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The crows will return. Oh yes they will.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Very sad. Here's another perspective on how to take care of our neighbours: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/canuck-the-crow-injured-community-rallies-1.4042032

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Birds don't fart. Avian intestines are short and evacuate wastes frequently.

Tell me about it. That's why I have to clean my car every 2 days. But seriously, it's a very sad thing, love crows. Exceptionally smart animals.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Its sad but people are the real pest! The birds are natural and have acclimated to their environment while people are still trying to make it difficult for them to live! Let nature be and let the birds live, selfish humans always complaining about their own problems!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Those (very annoying) birds are pretty resilient and with few natural predators, it's no wonder they flourish in Japan (and much of east Asia). That said, for suddenly having 50 found dead crows (no they aren't ravens) in a park is a bit unusual. Historically such a find was found to be a result of the bird having been infected by consumption of trash items containing the bacteria pathogen of clostridium - or in layman's terms - botulism. It's possible the birds consumed contaminated food from the same garbage pile, which may warrant additional investigation as to who owns the source - hopefully its not a restaurant or food market.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Birds don't fart. Avian intestines are short and evacuate wastes frequently.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Only if someone is behind the crow die-offs, I can imagine the criminal is crowing over making the news. Hope police break the case ASAP.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Can't birds fart? Seems like there are two ways for gas to escape.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

IF they have been poisoned what someone could be doing is mixing bicarbonate of soda with the dry bread, what happens is the birds eat the bread, the soda reacts with the fluids in its guts/stomach, this produces a gas which expands thus killing the bird, as humans we can belch to relive the said gas pressure, but a bird can't do this, this fact was told to me by some who does pest control.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I have alwaysloved the crows; one even took bread from my hand on our balcony. They are smart and inquisitive and a living part of Tokyo. I saw with my own eyes that they also clean up behind dogs, and that's another benefit if not one you'd really like to think about.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Has there ever been a study of how much fauna have been wiped out from the overpopulation of crows? It's irresponsible for letting this get out of control? Seems to me all we have here is a crow vigilantly because the town, city, prefecture, government are too scared. But the gov. has no problem culling 100's of thousands of chickens. It really irks me when I go camping in the mountains only to be woken up at dawn by a murder of crows.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

There are lots of crows where I live. Big, glossy black, beautiful birds. They keep nature clean by disposing of carrion. Not their fault if people leave their nama gomi out as easy pickings.

Poisoned bread to deliberately kill crows? A sick mind at work, and as agenciq points out, totally irresponsible.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Your comment seems really naive in that context. As for the dog, my dog is trained not to eat anything that isn't from my hand or in her bowl. Not my problem if someone wants to poison crows.

If I'm naive then you must be really self centered. Since your dog is trained then it is completely fine for other non trained dogs to eat the poison from the ground and die. I can totally see you comforting your friend in a situation like that "hey, its your fault you didn't train your dog properly!"

If you didn't notice, I wasn't saying that reducing overpopulation of crows that are problematic is bad, but throwing poisoned bread around in the park where other animals might die eating it or worst case scenario a child playing around might just put it in their mouth and swallow it is not a really good way to fix the problem don't you think?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

That's funny. If that would actually be a poisoned piece of bread dropped by someone on purpose in a park and then let's say your dog would eat it and die, would you still consider it public service?That's reaaaaaallllyyy narrow minded thinking right there.

I've seen a group of crows attacking three kittens in a park as the mother cat could only carry one at a time. They killed and ate the baby cats. Your comment seems really naive in that context. As for the dog, my dog is trained not to eat anything that isn't from my hand or in her bowl. Not my problem if someone wants to poison crows. We have groups of hunters who yearly go out and cull large groups of crows with shot guns, The city actually organizes these slaughters just after Golden week when they are nesting. Takes care of two generations at once.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The larger of the crows, are crows as in Jungle Crows

And as Zichi said they are incredibly smart & yes they do remember!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

They are ravens, not crows.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Crows steal all the cat food in my neighbourhood, and we are subject to tanuki raids as well. Our fishpond has been gutted by them multiple times.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wow, 50! They must've been murdered!

5 ( +6 / -1 )

When we lived in Kobe, my daughter and I were walking the hills above the city when we heard a loud thump right behind us. There on the path not 5 yards away was a white double kagami-mochi. Above we saw a crow circling. If that solid disc of hard rice had hit either of us on the head, it would have been curtains for sure. Why, I wanted to ask...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's said that crows never forget those who hurt them?

A neighbor swung a broom around once to scare them away from the gomi station, and after that they'd dive-bomb her when she went to throw out her trash.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

@zichi It's said that crows never forget those who hurt them?

Especially when they look like an evil Republican.

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/uw-professor-learns-crows-dont-forget-a-face/

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The Jungle crow is a large, black, fearsome-looking bird with a wingspan of up to 104 cm and a body length of 50 cm. It weighs up to 650 grams and lives up to 19 years.

Crows drop clams from a height to break open the shells, and they have been seen in Tokyo waiting at traffic lights for the red light, and then placing walnuts on the road. When the lights change, cars run over the nuts and crack them. At the next red light, the crows stroll into the road to pick up their meal.

It's said that crows never forget those who hurt them?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

poisoning crows, public service IMO.

That's funny. If that would actually be a poisoned piece of bread dropped by someone on purpose in a park and then let's say your dog would eat it and die, would you still consider it public service?

That's reaaaaaallllyyy narrow minded thinking right there.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

If it was disease, they wouldn't have found all the dead birds in the same 40m area. We all know that diseases are spread by contact and that it takes time for the initial symptoms to show up. Crows disperse and have wide ranges. Had this been some sort of avian virus, etc., then you'd be finding dead crows all over the place and not a patch of dead birds. If it turns out to be electromagnetic radiation from UFO chem trails....then I'll eat crow...

4 ( +4 / -0 )

poisoning crows, public service IMO.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

Most likely not.

My area is not really exposed to tanuki, etc like tama, etc.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How about using large metal containers (known to most of us as Dumpsters)

There isn't space for that kind of thing. You never see containers outside of building sites too.

Use yellow rubbish bags, crows can't see that colour or same coloured nets.

The nets in some places like ours are also against the wild pigs which come down during the night. Would yellow help with that too.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Crows aren't the real problem. How about using large metal containers (known to most of us as Dumpsters) instead of those cages and nets? If the crows were poisoned, I hope if they find the culprit(s) and throw the book at them.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Use yellow rubbish bags, crows can't see that colour or same coloured nets.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I refer to the mountain behind my Kobe house as "Crow City". Not tens, not hundreds, more than thousands. Huge birds too. I even went up the mountain to check them out. Huge nests high up in the trees. We now cover the weekly garbage bags with netting to discourage crow raids but with those large beaks they just poke through. Wood hawks in lower numbers who eat some of the crows, their young and the eggs. Ariel combats lasting several minutes.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I'd guess they have been baited. The disease scenario is interesting. Could you imagine Tokyo without crows? Wouldn't that be a fantastic thing?

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

a man reported a crow eating something like a piece of bread then died yet no bread, and 50 in all...sounds like a disease to me

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Poison?

My City had a crow problem, they tried poison and removing eggs from nests.

What did it was changing the colour of rubbish bags to ones they can't see and requiring nets/covers for collection points.

Happily Crow free now.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

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