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6-year-old boy falls to death from 8th floor

12 Comments

A 6-year-old boy died Thursday afternoon after he fell out of the window of an 8th-floor apartment in a high-rise building in Nishinomiya, Hyogo Prefecture, police said.

According to police, Toranosuke Ueyama was found unconscious at the base of the condo, at around 2:30 p.m., Fuji TV reported. He was taken to a hospital, but was soon pronounced dead.

The boy was playing in his grandfather’s apartment with his younger and older sisters. He is believed to have jumped up on a bed and tore open the window screen, and then fell out the window, police said.

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12 Comments
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Hopefully this will quash those comments about mothers chucking kids out of windows... I think the problem with Japanese flats is that they are so small that windows are easily accessed by a determined child, in this case from a bed.

It's such a tragic accident.. RIP little boy.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

The 6-year-old boy was likely to have jumped on the bed using it as a makeshift trampoline. I wish the grandpa had given him a caution against jumping on the bed. RIP.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Why were they allowed to be jumping on a bed by an open window in an 8th floor apartment?

Another tragic accident.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

As a parent I cannot imagine - how sad. I feel for his parents and more so for his grandfather. I cannot imagine what they are going through.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

RIP.

Thunderbird2: "Hopefully this will quash those comments about mothers chucking kids out of windows"

Who on earth said anything of the sort, besides you? Funny thing to start a comment with what you hope won't be mentioned.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

8th floor, open window, flimsy screens, kids jumping on bed, one kid goes through the screen. That sounds like a totally preventable death to me.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

That is sad news, poor little boy. RIP

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Stories ike this are pretty common, I live in an apartment with some windows opening out on a deadly drop and it is always in the back of my mind with a young child at home. The cramped nature of apartments here make it very difficult to fully guard against this sort of thing since furniture is inevitably going to be within reach of a window (or something else that can be used as a stepping stone is). We are planning to move to a lower floor partly for that reason.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Who on earth said anything of the sort, besides you? Funny thing to start a comment with what you hope won't be mentioned.

With stories like this JT posters automatically assume foul play and start hurling accusations without any sort of proof.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Thunderbird2: "With stories like this JT posters automatically assume foul play and start hurling accusations without any sort of proof."

You do your fair share of that, and in any case they often do it when there is room for doubt, based on the fact that in a couple of very recent cases women did throw their children out the window. In fact, I'd wager the other way around: that people usually assume the child fell. THAT is usually accompanied with doubt about parental responsibility (some here are blaming gramps for not stopping them bouncing on the bed, for example), with people pointing out cluttered balconies and things close to the (open) window that children can climb up on and out. That's why so many buildings these days have netting and safety structures at the bottom to hopefully catch kids if they fall out. Would have been nice if this building had them.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sad!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

seriously its just plain common sense, I bought a new house last year, on all the second and 3rd-floor windows i had them place safety rails across every window about 8 of them. so while my 4 yr old is also taught not to play near the open windows its nearly impossible for him to fall out now. Even an adult couldn't accidently fall out. Cost shouldn't be a factor when it comes to safety. Just a forward thinking common sense approach, not the all too common, "No it wont happen to us"

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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