national

80% of prefectures unsure of securing doctors for vaccinations: poll

50 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

50 Comments
Login to comment

This is why Japan needs to socialize and nationalize its healthcare system. The current one, dominated by private-sector operators, is riddled with skewed, highly inefficient resource allocation, in terms of staffing, bed availability, etc.

I hope this crisis teaches Japan's administrators and policymakers a profound lesson and pushes them toward making sweeping reform of a system that can't cope.

22 ( +30 / -8 )

Nothing novel about this virus anymore.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

And Japanese govt. will not cancel Olympic games. Idiots.

26 ( +28 / -2 )

In some countries, pharmacists are able to give shots to the public. I wonder if Japan could get around the shortage of nurses and doctors by enlisting pharmacists as part of the vaccination campaign?

15 ( +17 / -2 )

anti-COVID-19 vaccines

Who writes this stuff at Kyodo News? Guess I'lI see if I can get an anti-anti-COVID-19 vaccine when it's ready...

13 ( +14 / -1 )

Revise the law that allows non doctors to inject and nurses could do it like the rest of the world

18 ( +20 / -2 )

Revise the law that allows non doctors to inject and nurses could do it like the rest of the world

We will consider an expert panel for that.

15 ( +19 / -4 )

Not surprising, considering the fact that hospitals don't open on weekends and nationals holidays. Because, you know, people get sick only on weekdays.

20 ( +20 / -0 )

Britain, who started vaccinations early December, according to news reports are inoculating faster than other countries. The U.K. has managed to vaccinate just under 5 million people with the first shot. They are enlisting the help from a charity who are trained in very basic health support.

Based on these numbers it could take 130 weeks to provide their population with the treatment.

Excluding issues of vaccine supply chain, securing enough medically trained staff, vaccination centres, appropriate batch testing of the vials, and assuming Japan is able to be as efficient as Britain has been, it could take around 260 weeks for the residents of Japan to be vaccinated. Give or take a few weeks, that’s roughly, about, hmmmmm, 5 years. With around 30+ million over 65 yr old people in Japan, receiving their two doses, others could be waiting for more than 60 weeks; unless you get a ‘fast pass’.

I hope my figures are wrong and they don’t get logistical problems. Many of us could be waiting a long time to get vaccinated.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

I'm sure they have already thought about this, my guess is a course for needle use just 4 weeks and a 10 page exam, that you pay to do. And hey presto qualified needle technicians will abound!

11 ( +11 / -0 )

80% of prefectures unsure of securing doctors for vaccinations: poll

Do they sure about Olympic?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Dentists should be drafted in for the inoculation campaign. I am not sure but I think nurses are allowed to give intra muscular injections such as vaccines but not intravenous injections. If not that must change now.

And are they still going to take hundreds if not more nurses and doctors away from this for the Olympics? That is criminal

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Enlist the SDF into the effort. If they dont have the skills, start training them now. They still have a good few months before any vaccines will be available at this rate.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

One ot the problems here is doctors have to examine you before vaccinating. Meaning not just anyone can administer the shots w/out a doctor present. Hopefully, they'll change that caviat to speed up the process.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

I am not sure but I think nurses are allowed to give intra muscular injections such as vaccines but not intravenous injections

What am I missing? What exactly takes more than a 5 minute explanation giving a muscular injection? As far as I can tell, only "tricky" part is to make sure there is no air bubble in the needle.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

One ot the problems here is doctors have to examine you before vaccinating

No they don't. I've never been examined before a flu shot in Japan. You have to fill out a form, and that's it.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

The consequences of not having a joined up primary care system. Why not follow the U.K.’s example and get retired doctors and nurses to help, also pharmacists, dentists, midwives, vets etc can give vaccines.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Retired healthcare workers, the SDF.

The entire nation should be offered vaccination this year. Free of charge.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

Before the flu shot there is a form, but nobody seems to put the data in a computer so it could be quickly updated if necessary. That is because they have to send a fax copy to the ward off to be put in a folder piled on stacks of folders. Take a tour of the shiyakusho. Amazing.

Nurses pull blood here and that needle is much bigger than a standard needle size for a vaccine. They also insert needles for fluids if you are hospitalized, so they are trained already.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Japan has chosen the vaccine that needs the super freezing. Any though been taken to the nightmare logistics of this vaccine. How will people in the countryside be vaccinated? They will have to travel hundreds of kilometres to big cities to be vaccinated, as only there will they have the special freezers? Together with this story how fast will this vaccine, that has to be used very soon after being taken out of the freezers, be used? It is a disaster in waiting. However on the good side japan not rushing in to vaccinate means they will be able to get the tweaked vaccine for the new variants that are now spreading in Japan ( local transmission of UK variant just found in Tokyo as well as Shizouka now)

4 ( +4 / -0 )

In the USA a person can get vaccination at the pharmacy such as CVS or Costco. In Japan it would be Kyorindo (sp?) where everything is sold and drugs. Who gives the shot in the USA, the pharmacist. It doesn't take a lot of training to give a shot. This solution is something the the Japan health ministry needs to consider. The only problem is as delivery becomes more available, vaccine supply diminishes.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Luckily we have a $7billion empty stadium in the center of Tokyo that was designed for millions of people a day.

nurses can easily do the jab thing. That would free up doctors to do important work like treating cancer etc.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

All this needs is for the self obsessed Japanese politicians to pass laws NOW to counter these inconsistencies.

However, when it takes endless waiting and phone calls to even get a test for the virus then I am not optimistic.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"Britain, who started vaccinations early December, according to news reports are inoculating faster than other countries"

and the UK is only giving out the first jab, which mean the first jab is only 50% effective.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Like lemmings off a cliff. You'd think the health care system being threatened is only JUST NOW a problem, and not when this whole thing started a year ago. If only they had started preparing then and not just shrugged and later tried to pray it away. And still, what are they doing besides voicing concern? Seems to me once again they are praying someone else will come in and fix it for them.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

End of May to innoculate the whole population? - never going to happen.

Olympics still seems to be the selfish goal of a few old boy politicians, and they really don't care about regular civilians. They've even said they were preparing for an Olympics without vaccinations. The nerves of these selfish representatives holding the country hostage and having NHK run pro-athlete propaganda. Now the IOC says there is an Olympics without fans possibility ...

The people here will never stand up and voice their anger. I'm not sure the Japanese get angry or want to(?) Ga-man it on everyone! Ugh

3 ( +4 / -1 )

jforceToday  11:57 am JST

End of May to innoculate the whole population?

Who said that?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The” air bubble”in an injection needle is dangerous incase of an intravenous injection as the bubble can reach the heart or brain and cause a heart attack or stroke. Intra muscular, while of course to be avoided, its is not such a concern.

Dentists are the first in line to join doctors and nurses with vets. Japan has army’s of them. That includes of course those in the service of the SDF.

next, the last year students for nurse or doctor, if by then they don’t know how to give this injection, sack them for their degrees.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

They don't have enough doctors for this ....but somehow they said they will have thousands of doctors and nurses available for the Olympics...yeah right .

As others said...SDF, pharmacists,...form your overpaid amakudari expert panels to discuss what's working overseas already.

It is good that Japan is getting this problem out in the open and dealing with it now. I don't recall seeing any such stories in the west before they started their program.

I don't see Japan " dealing" with it....one media report is not " dealing" with the issue. And as we have all witnessed over the last year Japan can be counted on to be the absolute slowest to roll this out with the most " challenges, difficulties and obstructions. Let the teeth sucking begin.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

I have a simple solution that takes the north America idea and turns it to uniquely Japanese.

In both the USA and Canada they have drive through.

Well all that needs to be done is rent some local spaces with pick up windows there are plenty since so many businesses have gone under.

Rent 2 in each location one to drop off vaccine papers get a number the other is where the people walk up to the window the nurse Jabs them they walk off to the park where they set up open sided tents for the one hour observation.

Seeing there is no way the public will start vaccination until mid to late summer it can all he done outside of sorts.

No need for thousands of nurses/doctors denting up hospitals etc..

Walk by vaccination.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The” air bubble”in an injection needle is dangerous incase of an intravenous injection as the bubble can reach the heart or brain and cause a heart attack or stroke.

Ok let's dispel this long running rumour.

Former paramedic here do I do know what I am saying.

Yes in theory that could happen but the amount of air would have to be far more than a tiny bubble and would also have to be injected intravenously (meaning directly into a vein)

Vaccines are give subcutaneous mean under the skin. There is zero chance of any air getting into a vein or artery and reaching the heart, lungs brain of any other internal organs.

So stop the fear mongering.

It takes lest than an hour to train someone to properly do vaccinations and is why in North America most places permit pharmacies to give influenza vaccination.

Ok now I hope that one is put to rest.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

What a surprise. A year into the pandemic, Japan has not yet started to plan for vaccination. The Olympics, however can proceed full steam ahead and we are expected to believe that there was sufficient medical planning to handle mass heatstroke even before the pandemic hit.

Situation normal: a) do nothing and hope for the best, b) wait until a shambles occurs, c) claim nobody could have foreseen the shambles.

Everyone gets their slice of the grift and the population shrugs and says "shoganai".

Rinse and repeat.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

I do not mind about the vaccine, not in a rush to get it, but in that case, most of third world countries are doing better than Japan for vaccination.

Task force setup with Amakudari jobs behind the scene.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The” air bubble”in an injection needle is dangerous incase of an intravenous injection as the bubble can reach the heart or brain and cause a heart attack or stroke.

Ask your doctor next time if this is true before posting story lines of movies and quoting the internet.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

People can be rapidly trained to give a vaccine, but I would really want a doctor nearby in case of serious adverse reactions.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

There have been about 11 cases of anaphylaxis per 1 million doses, which is treatable with EpiPen. You don't need to be a doctor to use EpiPen. People with severe allergies can use it themselves.

Yes, there are reactions, but no one has died from these reactions.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Why not follow the U.K.’s example and get retired doctors and nurses to help, also pharmacists, dentists, midwives, vets etc can give vaccines.

The word flexibility doesn't exist in the Japanese dictionary, for that to happen, a panel has to be formed to study the issue, another to study the recommendation of the first panel and countless meetings thereafter about the need to change or create new laws.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Well my comment was deleted.. Obviously, criticising Japanese govt. why they not cancel Olympics is not an good option.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Doctor are not needed for vaccinations. Nurses can handle it. Actually sticking a needle to muscle is so easy that almost anybody can do it with a little practise. Obviously there needs to be a team that can handle rare side effects, allergies etc.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

and the UK is only giving out the first jab, which mean the first jab is only 50% effective.

No, many have had their second dose too.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Doctor are not needed for vaccinations. Nurses can handle it.

I've never been injected by a doctor in my life - only ever by nurses.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I’ve pricked myself with needles more times than I can count and I’m still alive...

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Of course, anyone could set the vaccination shot, even junior high school kids could do that, and in many other countries also nurses or pharmacy staff do mass vaccinations. But that’s really not the point here, as you have to interview the patients beforehand, look for possible allergic reactions, disease history of the patients , current infection status, light symptoms, current regular and also acute other medications or drug use, age, gender , and even consider size, weight, and although you probably don’t like to hear and loudly disagree, racial specifics, also current majority virus strains , mutations, variants and a lot more. It’s definitely not something that could or should be done in a minute or by unprofessional people. It’s a quickly developed vaccine, therefore you have to go into the details here, while if it were a long time used very well-known vaccine, you could scale those precautions down, but that’s not the case here, so you need doctors and nurses with great expertise.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@Redbear, With one shot you get most of the immediate protection not 50%, the second tops it up and provides for a longer term protection.

There seems little point in railing against the Japanese lack of flexibility or underlying culture of acceptance (except to make you feel better!) it is what it is and only the Japanese can change it. Not likely.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Yes, there are reactions, but no one has died from these reactions.

What? Many have died!!! Including healthy medical staff, and even doctors.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

This is why Japan needs to socialize and nationalize its healthcare system.

Japan has a national health care system that they call their national health care system. No national system is going to be exactly the same.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Wick's pencilToday  09:02 pm JST

Yes, there are reactions, but no one has died from these reactions.

What? Many have died!!! Including healthy medical staff, and even doctors.

One person died during the trials, but that person was getting the placebo and not the vaccine.

One doctor died weeks after getting the vaccine but did not have a reaction. The reason for his death has not been explained.

Everyone here has an internet connection and can check the accuracy of their comments before posting.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

as I've stated before the logistics are incredible that to expect vaccines to be suddently possible in February is the same canard as the Olympics in July.

You would have had to have bought freezers in 2020 to just start. Maybe you can imagine there's a huge worldwide demand for hospital-level freezers that can cool at -80C. As well as a delivery supply chain that keeps it cold as well. You cannot receive vaccines until you have those. Then there are the test runs to prove that your supply chain works.

This will push back the date even further

Of course you need staff, but also the tracking as people have to return in a few weeks for their second dose. Then a few weeks after THAT finally that person should be technically vaccinated

Also is Japan last in this? We have already been vaccinating for a month now, so only now are people getting their second doses. Still a few more weeks away from where those people be considered protected. Canada reporting 2.11% of population received their first dose. Top country so far is Israel at 39% of population.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-vaccine-tracker-how-many-people-in-canada-have-received-shots-1.5247509

Scroll down for latest world wide percentages

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Also is Japan last in this? We have already been vaccinating for a month now,

You would have to ask the vaccine manufacturers about that.

But even deliveries to countries who are currently receiving supplies are delayed right?

Might take awhile for the countries further along the queue to receive supplies

Of course even if its japans turn to receive supplies the vaccines have to be approved first, might take a long time.

Thanks for the informative post

1 ( +1 / -0 )

One person died during the trials, but that person was getting the placebo and not the vaccine.

One doctor died weeks after getting the vaccine but did not have a reaction. The reason for his death has not been explained.

0( +3 / -3 )

Okay, so why don't you downvoters post some facts of people who's death is attributable to a Covid vaccine?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites