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9 dead, 6 missing in water accidents across Japan

23 Comments

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Let's keep our faith for their safe return. I miss Otaru, once my workplace.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Water looks a bit rough in the picture. Poor kids.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Why are the rescuers on the beach and not in the water or in a boat?????

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

They were searching in the water and from the air by helicopter.

Why are the rescuers on the beach and not in the water or in a boat?????

Maybe they were observing conditions before going in. Maybe there were already rescuers in the water.

I fear a tragic outcome.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

swimming outside the area of the designated beach

anybody who knows and respects the sea, will know that conditions can change within hours. so the idea of a designated beach is ridiculous. if you can't swim confidently, use a life jacket and fins.

i hope alcohol wasn't involved...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

That's just sad! RIP you young boys.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"They were swimming outside the area of the designated beach"

"Swimming is prohibited in the area"

i just knew phrases like these would follow pretty much all the deaths/missing reports. They never think it will happen to them, and always have to learn the hardest way that it can. RIP to those lost. Hope others will learn from this, but given it's a yearly tally and entirely predictable, I know they won't.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

For a small island nation with a huge population I'm always surprised how little education people have on water safety.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

anybody who knows and respects the sea, will know that conditions can change within hours. so the idea of a designated beach is ridiculous. 

A non bathing or natural/designated beach means that there are sudden drop offs of 3 or 4 feet at the bottom, which explains why the students at Otaru found themselves unable to stand. The waves were picking up and it became impossible to swim back. There were danger signs warning of the many accidents in that area but who knows ? ?....maybe there need to be more.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There certainly seems to be a need for more lifeguards in Japan but it is easier to put up signs prohibiting activities than finding and paying for workers to watch beaches.......

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

So many tragic situations and also moments of madness.

Saving your parakeet may seem ludicris, but so is saving your friend in powerful waves when you have no way of getting yourself back to shore once you have gotten to him/her. So many people die trying to save someone else.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

My thoughts and prayers go to the victims and their families. May their loved ones find strength through these very difficult times.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Lizz - the idea of a designated beach is ridiculous. 

I'm guessing you haven't been to many beaches in Japan. Beaches that are 'designated' for swimming are protected by those ugly tetrapod walls and do not have strong currents and large waves. A few of them also have lifeguards, not many though. Beaches that are dangerous for swimmers do have warning signs in many languages. However, most people have no water safety education and little swimming training, which leads to 10-20 water deaths every summer. Australia has a similar yearly statistic of surf deaths although, ironically, most of the deaths are Asian tourists or recent immigrants and the majority of deaths are from rock fishing. Water safety, swimming and CPR/first aid make up a large part of the elementary and high school education in Australia, which is not the case in Japan.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

In Kanagawa Prefecture southwest of Tokyo, Takeshi Nagase, 77, died in a swimming competition at Zushi beach.

I wonder how that happened, since during the summer there is a lifeguard station with a large staff. They even have a jet ski to use in rescues

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I get choked up every time I read these. I have been on the rescued end before and I've seen people fighting for their lives get rescued successfully. Prayers all around and hopes that all of the people who are missing are found safely.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

i swim all year round but understand the dangers. i sometimes swim in typhoons. this all comes down to education. Japanese children have a swimming lesson in a not so clean swimming pool 4 times a year at school. the sea and rivers are not swimming pools. their overconfidence may be a major contributing factor.

My biggest risk however, is getting sunburnt at the beach yesterday.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

i sometimes swim in typhoons

Why would you want to swim during a Typhoon?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If you can't swim, don't go into the water.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Saving your parakeet may seem ludicris, but so is saving your friend in powerful waves when you have no way of getting yourself back to shore once you have gotten to him/her. So many people die trying to save someone else.

A friend I can maybe understand, but If I was ever in a situaiton where it was a member of my family, I don't think I would even think about the consquesnces of my own life. If I didn't jump in to help and they died I would never forgive myself.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

A friend I can maybe understand, but If I was ever in a situaiton where it was a member of my family, I don't think I would even think about the consquesnces of my own life. If I didn't jump in to help and they died I would never forgive myself.

My wife and I were watching novice surfers the other day. They were falling, getting swept up in currents, laughing. My wife, knowing I can't swim but am always willing to help, told me, "If they start to drown, don't help them." Wise advice.

I did, however, look for a person who could swim and/or had one of those gawdawful jet skis. Just in case.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A friend I can maybe understand, but If I was ever in a situaiton where it was a member of my family, I don't think I would even think about the consquesnces of my own life. If I didn't jump in to help and they died I would never forgive myself.

Right on! This happened to me and my best friend. My wife was on an air donut and getting swept out. Dove right in and swam out. Got to her but couldn't fight the current. Thank god we had a friend new friend on shore watching and he flagged a surfer who was about 100 meters down the shoreline, quickly came over and towed us in. I still hate to think about it. Worst memory of my life to date.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Mathew. Waves and fun. But I am also careful.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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