national

Abe ends state of emergency in Osaka, Kyoto, Hyogo; Tokyo's may be lifted Monday

79 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

79 Comments
Login to comment

Lift all restrictions, enough damage has been done.

-7 ( +40 / -47 )

The worst threat to a second wave is public transportation.

Cramming 50 strangers into a box like a bus or train together for 30 minutes is basically the worst thing you can do.

Cars and motorcycles keep commuters isolated and are far better at containing the spread.

There should be an action plan to get people to use private transportation for commuting.

We need something like a moratorium on parking tickets and highway tolls for private vehicles.

0 ( +30 / -30 )

What is the difference between Osaka and Tokyo according the daily life?

Osaka is reopen but Tokyo not. I dont understand that.

It is time to reopen Tokyo, and let the people live their lifes like they want.

My home country with the top number 3 worldwide cases opened its beergardens already.

The people all over the world want to go back to their lifes!

So let them do!

1 ( +32 / -31 )

Now most people have called b.s on the constant "in two weeks"

This fictitious threat of a second wave is used to stop people figuring out it was all a complete waste of time.

Lift the s.o.e, return to normal life

1 ( +27 / -26 )

As long as Koike is mayor, Tokyo is doomed,

2 ( +25 / -23 )

I think I’m gonna vomit if I read about the diaomando princess again!

23 ( +30 / -7 )

Burning bush, private transportation to and from work for Tokyo is out of the question, it cannot be achieved in anyway, considering the no. Of people who commute to Tokyo to work and those who live in Tokyo

20 ( +24 / -4 )

The best they can do is add more trains and flexible working hrs plus opening the windows on all the trains which they are doing

23 ( +27 / -4 )

“I think I’m gonna vomit if I read about the diaomando princess again”

Kobe, you made me laugh this morning, that was funny!

9 ( +16 / -7 )

Hokkaido:

- - 0.5 cases / 100,000 in HOK equals 27.5 new cases daily to satisfy these arbitrary draconian standards... - - Cases in Hokkaido haven't been that high since May 4th / more than 2 weeks ago... ***Source:*** https://stopcovid19.hokkaido.dev/en/

Truth be told - even though its a tremendous pain in the backside with the minor restrictions that come with a SOE, I am happy that those of us living in HOK are being forced to endure this for a few more days / weeks of this nonsense - the extra days may make our situation for the better in the long run but PULEASE don't throw out these "standards" and then ignore them of suggest that the environmental, cultural and social norms can be compared using the same numbers between HOK and Tokyo - the sheer size of HOK and it's population base means that we are already ahead of the curve in regard to social distancing...

Happy to take a couple of extra days in isolation if it helps in the long run though....

12 ( +17 / -5 )

Monty, Kanagawa still has some cases they are worried about and considering people from those 4 prefectures mingle all the time, it’s on the safer side to wait it out for them to see fewer or zero cases from Kanagawa and Tokyo, Japanese before lifting it for all four prefectures, even with the emergency in place a lot of people have returned to work, I’m in Shinjuku station now and it’s busy as compared to last week

2 ( +8 / -6 )

MontyToday  07:13 am JST

What is the difference between Osaka and Tokyo according the daily life?

A major difference? Space. Despite being a busy city, Osaka has nothing on Tokyo. Ever tried to change trains between JR and Ginza lines at Shinbashi station in peak hour? You're up close and personal with the hairs on the next person's neck all the way from the wicket, down the stairs, to your next stop. Plus, Tokyo commute times are loooonnnggg.

21 ( +21 / -0 )

Memo to Abe and the other fools who comprise you panel of "experts": the number of new cases over the last five days according to the official Hokkaido webpage are as follows: May 16th (7), May 17th (8), May 18th (1), May 19th (3) and May 20th (1). 12 out of these 20 cases involve people 60 years or older. Abe's math doesn't even match the criteria he has set up for this shutdown. What a pathetic excuse for a leader and this government, in general.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

The decision of reopening (its postponement) would be plausible and acceptable so long as it is made based on objective criteria.

I would be more troubled if it is on a basis of public feelings, in an arbitrary manner.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Mid-April an 80 year old man who was deathly sick in Saitama could not be admitted into hospital due to a 200 patient waiting list due to the virus he died alone at home.

May, a Sumo wrestler also gravely ill with the virus and his stable tried over and over to get him tested for the virus and only near the end of his life did he get tested. The stable called an ambulance and only days before he died, and the ambulance drove around for 3 hours to find a hospital to have this man admitted into that is incredibly sad. The question begs, why, could this man be admitted sooner all beds were full of virus patients?

The reason Tokyo and surrounding areas are not opening up is the numbers they are providing like other countries are not been fully disclosed and or there not enough testing and or both and there will be a huge wave of cases.

I have not followed Osaka's cases and pray they will not rebound and deaths.

3 ( +16 / -13 )

Well I’m actually glad on both ends with this. Warm glad then three more prefectures I’ve opened up, and therefore the vast majority of them have opened up, I’m glad that the areas hard is it haven’t yet. Because we don’t want a resurgence of this virus when reasonably possible, right? And since I live in the US, let me just tell you, you don’t know what I would give for that sort of situation here in the US.

Especially if you’re in places like Italy, which are in lockdown. As well as New York and California here in the US. As much as I want this shut down to be lifted, and for things to get back to normal, let’s do it carefully. Besides, like I said, it could be worse.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

*while I’m glad that 3 prefectures... * sorry, my bad.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

At this point, it’s time to reopen. The cure is now worse than the prevention.

The flu is a more dangerous virus, and yet the economy isn’t shut every winter to slow it down. Nor are many people vaccinated against it.

COVID-19 IS dangerous, but people should go about their lives, using common-sense precautions.

-2 ( +17 / -19 )

So Tokyo is using "medical institution inspections" which are not PCR tests as a justification for less cases and artificially low positive/negative ratio.

Despite WHO and experts advice that asymptomatic people are the one spreading the disease. So just because a person has no symptoms it shouldn't be concluded as a negative case.

Source: https://stopcovid19.metro.tokyo.lg.jp/

Where they pretend that more than 1000 tests have been conducted when in fact only 80 are actual tests. Reopening under those blind conditions is just irresponsible.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

What a ridiculous, stupid, moronic metric of basing the emergency order on new infections falling below 0.5 per 100,000 people in a week. There is absolutely no common sense or rationality to this heavy handed metric. So if 70 people over the age of 75 in nursing homes or other facilities are infected a prefecture of 14 million people are still under the emergency order jackboot. I know Planet J can be weird but this is bizarre!

4 ( +13 / -9 )

So how are we gonna go with Ehime?

Quite some new infections during the past couple of days.

"They" call it clusters .... but since those folks were most definitely not staying in one place, I expect more to come. Even Kanagawa has seen a new increase. I DO understand that there can't be a "permanent" lockdown, but please be careful! In addition, I appreciate the explanations by Fred Lewis! That made the Jpaanese counting system easier to understand!

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

So if 70 people over the age of 75 in nursing homes or other facilities are infected

How did the old folks become infected without leaving the premises?

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Concerning transportation conditions, many people have brought this up as an area of concern. However, that may not be as much of an issue in Japan as elsewhere—and this may explain why there was not a surge in cases despite transportation conditions. Note that in Japan talking on trains is quite rare, and since the state of emergency, coughing has also been rare to hear on trains. Thus, the possibility for droplets and aerosols is significantly lower than might be expected. Of greater concern would be snack bars or girls bars, where people are talking or singing without masks in a closed environment. Regardless, even with masks, we know based on a few studies that the SARS-Cov2 virus is smaller than the fibres on most masks, and that they have negligible if no effect. While SARS-Cov2 is in the obvious droplets that a mask prevents spreading, it is also airborne and pays no heed to the barrier that a typical non-N95 mask would present.

I couldn't find any statistics regarding locations of infection in Tokyo. However, there is some interesting evidence from NYC in a National Bureau of Economic Research paper which shows that there is not a clear correlation between transportation lines and areas of high rates of infection. The New York State data that can be found on a CNBC article from May 6th suggests that 66% of people are getting infected while staying at home, 18% while at nursing homes, and the other areas of infection were not as statistically relevant. So primarily, people are getting this regardless of whether they're taking transportation or not. The minor interactions people have while attempting to remain in home-quarantine (be it with deliveries or short trips to the shops) are still contributing the most.

Essentially what this means is that there's very little that we can do in terms of legislation or human action to prevent the spread of the virus. Lethality depends a lot upon health and pre-existing conditions, which may be why NYC got hit so badly, since obesity and other diseases are quite common there. There are many factors that may contribute to why Japan is not exhibiting a bad outbreak—lack of serious pre-existing health conditions, BCG vaccination, pneumonia vaccination, and also the likelihood that Japan received a less-virulent strain than that which spread west. It is hard to know for certain what the best course of action to take would be, but I would say it depends mainly upon the ability to treat those who are critically ill. At the moment, with 210 critically ill cases nationally as of May 20th, and 700 ICU units available for COVID in Tokyo, in addition to thousands of extra beds acquired from hotels and so forth, it seems like we have little reason to fear. I agree that it is helpful to see a downward and sustained trend before opening, but we also have to accept that COVID is going to be with us for a few years, and as long as we can manage to treat those who are critical, we should not close down the economy.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

I have pre-existing conditions, so I'm glad the SOE is continuing in Hokkaido, as it means I can work from home. I'm just a little worried about what the true situation here is as Hakodate is doing less than 1 test per day.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

The New York State data that can be found on a CNBC article from May 6th suggests that 66% of people are getting infected while staying at home, 18% while at nursing homes, and the other areas of infection were not as statistically relevant

The vast majority of infections will be at home because there is lockdown and everybody is at home and the streets and mass transit empty. That doesn't mean it isn't transmitted in the train even if people are not talking. The virus can also be distributed through Surface Contact. Considering how infectious the virus is there is no way it isn't transmitted in the train conjestion and lack of distancing

By the way, it is impossible to track infection in the train considerIng the large number of people that use it daily.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I'm glad there are people with the wisdom enough to say it's too early to lift restrictions, especially with Hokkaido proving what happens when you do, but honestly, I think we all know that at this point the "State of Emergency declaration" is just words, and businesses are open regardless. I honestly hope that nothing comes of reopening (by nothing I mean nothing bad), and people in Japan are pretty good at staying home at the behest of the government, but otherwise words are just not enough. IF a second wave comes and we need to shut down again, laws need to be changed, and actual punishments implemented.

-3 ( +10 / -13 )

As the evidence mounts that countries and states which did not lock down are doing no worse, and often much better, than those who did, the justification for this idiocy becomes weaker and weaker. Isolate and protect the vulnerable - old or chronically sick people - and let everyone else get back to normal.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

The most 'effective' means for transmitting the virus is immediate contact. Though the virus lives on surfaces, acquiring the virus is avoidable by the simple act of washing one's hand and using disinfectant (100% alcohol destroys the virus). I have to ride the train into Osaka to work, one day a week. The trains are less crowded, everyone is masked, there is no direct contact and a determined avoidance to be face to face. Given the circumstances, that is about the best scenario, at the moment, when riding the trains. Awaiting the train, folks are spaced out. Trains are the major means of transport in Japan, no other type of locomotion comes close.

Yes, there is a large contingent of asymptomatic, perhaps larger than those with easily identifiable symptoms. This is another reason to follow protocols and hygiene standards. Minimizing contact is of course key. It tamps down the route of infection. Instead of clusters of disease, it is possible to create clusters that are disease free - difficult and the numbers would be large. Thusly, not traveling to other prefectures is incredibly sensible. Isolating the vulnerable is not just a necessity, but required.

To reduce the spread to a slow burn is the only viable stratagem, as a vaccine is lacking. The lack of determinants describing the nature of the virus, is perhaps due to the conservative nature of science - though that standard has been violated numerous times by speculative conjecture that has been proven to be inaccurate to lesser or greater degree. The course of the disease cannot be plotted out at the moment beyond the obvious data and metrics. Models are not adequate and the use of similar disease vectors, though providing insight, no matter how similar, are differing to an extent and degree it cannot predict what will rise in the next six months. An interesting study is referred to in a recent addition of The New Yorker, the town of Bolinas, California, where all the residents were tested. Japan as a whole, is in a good place. Thank one another and the culture. As for the politicians, it is in-spite of them, though whatever little help they offer is welcome. Be safe, follow protocol and standards of behavior.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

@oldman_13 your allowed to take off your mask go into Tokyo go for a drink please yourself..thats i you even reside here....

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Japan has done well in tackling the spread of the virus. Now less than 3000 active cases (and falling) in a country of 125 million or so.

This is a very positive sign.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

As long as Koike is mayor, Tokyo is doomed

I personally think she did much much  better job than Abe ....if anyone is a reason for doom look to the national government.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

"whether new infections have fallen below 0.5 per 100,000"

Which numbers they are going to count? They know that the number of people they are testing is not enough if very small, who they think they are fooling?

They want to restart the economy, ok but don't put on people's mind the idea that the we can go back to our normal lifes, doing that at this time will make life for the elderly, the pregnant and the ones with health problems a real misery

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Anyhow life must go on no point in prolonging the inevitable herd immunity there is no other option..

0 ( +5 / -5 )

The flu is a more dangerous virus

@ Christopher Glen - any studies you can cite to back this wild claim up? Otherwise we will have to take it as made up nonsense to back up your narrative.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

"Rational Reader",

in case you are referring to countries like Sweden, maybe you want to make yourself smart(er).

Sweden has one of the highest death rates of all countries fighting this darned virus.

So, what are you suggesting?

0 ( +6 / -6 )

@Northernlife: I've very happily been going for a drink with a very limited group of the same people twice a week since this started. I do reside here. What's your point?

6 ( +8 / -2 )

There are many factors that may contribute to why Japan is not exhibiting a bad outbreak—lack of serious pre-existing health conditions, BCG vaccination, pneumonia vaccination, and also the likelihood that Japan received a less-virulent strain than that which spread west

There are alot of assumptions out there why Japan was able to weather the covid-19 storm compared

to the U.S and the major European countries, unfortunately they are just mere assumptions as they are not backed by data.

Lack of serious pre-existing disease , Ok, Diabetes patients 7.2M, High blood pressure 10M, Heart patients1.8M

I don't know whether these numbers can be classified as "Lack of" as to do that a comprehensive comparison with the heavily affected countries as well as other less affected countries is necessary.

2) BCG vaccination, nope not only Japan, most countries in the world took BCG which makes it a non factor.

3) Pneumonia is the 4th largest killer here in Japan so don't see why it is a factor.

4) less Virulent strain- Contradictory and nothing but assumption- There was a report last month from a Tokyo

research body that Japan received 2 different strains the less virulent Wuhan strain early on which it over rode

and the present strain which is the European strain which beggars the question if it is the European why hasn't

it showed the same potent here like in Europe even with the Lockdowns they instituted.

When Italy was hit hard even with the lockdown we told it is because of the high percentage of the elderly

living with their younger family but then almost all the Major European countries France, Spain, Germany, Belgium were also hit hard whereas in the case of Japan with if not the oldest on the planet was spared

compared to even less populated less elderly populated countries.

We were told the virus will kill millions in Africa due to poverty, the lack of clean water, poor sanitation and almost non existent medical system but so far it hasn't been the case which shows the so called experts are

no more knowledgeable than you and me about this novel corona virus that is why it is novel because there

are so many unknowns about it and its behaviour has defied or made obsolete some long established believe about viruses.

Why do I think, Africa and other poor 3rd world countries won't be decimated by this virus, is because 1) the have a shorter life expectancy rate making most of the population youthful and we know that 80% of the infected are mild cases and in most cases don't even know they are infected so having a population of high

percentage of youths will see very few death casualties. If there is one thing, this virus has shown that it can still infect with impunity in very very hygienic environments as seen by the infection of crown prince, prime minister, actors, musician people who have led an affluent lifestyle.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I thought nations were trying to get rid of the virus? Not anymore?

Wouldn't lifting the restrictions help the virus spread again?

Considering the virus spread from very low.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

@klausdorth

On cases and deaths, Sweden is as almost the same as some other European countries (the worst is currently Belgium?). BUT much unlike to its neighbors, Sweden has never lockdowned and the economy has run with minimal restrictions. This is crucial especially at post-virus recovery phases.

@drlucifer

I also pay attention to African cases. There seems no global, singular pattern in the rate of virus transmission independently of local responses. The variability if proven may also challenge the R0 theory.   

0 ( +7 / -7 )

How about this?

https://unherd.com/thepost/nobel-prize-winning-scientist-the-covid-19-epidemic-was-never-exponential/

Tine to reopen

1 ( +6 / -5 )

The flu is a more dangerous virus, and yet the economy isn’t shut every winter to slow it down. Nor are many people vaccinated against it.

OMG. I cannot believe there is still people comparing covid-19 to the seasonal flu. Covid-19 is more deadly than the flu. Do doctors and nurses get killed every year treating flu patients? A little googling and you can find the facts.

3 ( +10 / -7 )

Good news. The sooner the better. The damage to the economy must be considerable already, need to recover as soon as possible.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

The flu is a more dangerous virus, and yet the economy isn’t shut every winter to slow it down. Nor are many people vaccinated against it.

OMG. I cannot believe there is still people comparing covid-19 to the seasonal flu. Covid-19 is more deadly than the flu. Do doctors and nurses get killed every year treating flu patients? A little googling and you can find the facts.

It's ok to compare the covid19 to the flu to get perspective on how deadly the novel coronavirus is.

But it we compare it must be done correctly.

At present comparing the number of deaths is inappropriate as the method for counting for the 2 illnesses are different. For covid19 actual number of deaths are counted while for the flu the counts are just statistical estimates, which are most probably inflated.

In any case, if we look at the US the covid19 deaths I think has already far outstriped the most inflated flu deaths estimate

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

@Christopher Glen

How about this?

https://unherd.com/thepost/nobel-prize-winning-scientist-the-covid-19-epidemic-was-never-exponential/

You must be joking? You use a tabloid website known for its unreliable articles. And use a "nobel prize-winning" scientist that has no scientific background in epidemiology.

Next time we should ask a Pulitzer-winning journalist or an Oscar-winning film director maybe (or maybe my 96 years old Grandma, she must be very wise and knowledgeable at that age). What a joke!

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Difficult decisions. I do not envy those that must make them.

The two facets are the economy and the impact of economic destruction on human health and on the other hand the virus itself.

For whatever reason Japan has not been impacted as severely as other locations. A high infection rate is not hard to "hide" but it would be very hard to hide a high death rate.

There have been countries or localities which have "re-opened" (Japan never had a lockdown) and the infection rate increased dramatically.

The death rate from this virus is lower than we first thought but the infection rate is certainly not lower than we first thought.

I think the lifting of the State of Emergency is probably the right call (to prevent an economic Armageddon....cant find another term) but I certainly hope that it is explained that common sense precautions should be continued (masks, social distancing, avoidance of crowds if possible, teleworking if possible) should be maintained until the results of the lifting of the State of Emergency are known.

To me this would seem to be common sense.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

People, companies and public institutions will now relax their guard. Then the pandemic will spike again and infect a lot of people.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Just saw the PM do an address to the nation. Scripted, reading, masked, crumbling.

this will all go down in history as a lesson of what leadership looks like, resolve, authenticity, transparency. Every country will get a score. Lucky for japan we have a populace that can shut down easily. A bunch of cultural factors contributing to low numbers. Good leadership it is not.

bring on the next generation of politicians. Please!

3 ( +5 / -2 )

For whatever reason Japan has not been impacted as severely as other locations. A high infection rate is not hard to "hide" but it would be very hard to hide a high death rate.

It has always been stated here by some that it is difficult to hide the death rate, but nobody has ever given reasons why is difficult.

Some of us really want to know.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Hyogo:

Total confirmed cases out of the 10,312 tested 699 ...that is 1 in 15 people tested so far;

   or 1 in 7,812 residents of Hyogo Prefecture.

Total deaths 38  ... that is 1 in 18 confirmed cases; or 1 in 143,697 residents of Hyogo Prefecture.

All the deaths are people over 60 years. highest number of cases 50-59 years.

Hospital bed capacity not reached.

https://covid19hyogo.org/

Come Saturday might take a trip into Himeji. My first for about three months.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Sweden has one of the highest death rates of all countries fighting this darned virus.

Per capita, Sweden is doing better than many European countries. And I expect them to be better able to handle future waves as they probably have greater herd immunity.

I thought nations were trying to get rid of the virus? Not anymore?

No, only herd immunity will achieve that. Shutting things down only delays that. All they can (should) do now is to prevent the hospitals from being overwhelmed.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Got an email from the Hyogo governor asking people to continue with all the safety requirements and prepare for a second wave of the Covid-19.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Sweden's death rate is currently the highest in Europe, with 6.08 deaths per million in the last week compared to 5.57 in the UK and 4.28 in Belgium - but its economy has taken a smaller hit than Britain's.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Got an email from the Hyogo governor asking people to continue with all the safety requirements and prepare for a second wave of the Covid-19.

Gov Ido is as clueless as Abe.The dropkick wouldn't know a wave from a waive.And Hyogo numbers are hardly want you'd consider a "wave" in the first place.

Then the pandemic will spike again and infect a lot of people.

I 'd guess you were one of the flock pronouncing the same tripe after GW holidays.Wish people would keep their negative,insecure criticisms to themselves when talking like that.I can be negative by myself.I don't need your help thank you.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@theresident did i say something to you...nope so whats ur point u want to go drinking during all this thats your thing..

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Health experts are telling the government to open up. Control freak Socialists are losing it.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

"Rational Reader",

in case you are referring to countries like Sweden, maybe you want to make yourself smart(er).

Sweden has one of the highest death rates of all countries fighting this darned virus.

--

Sweden's death rate is currently the highest in Europe, with 6.08 deaths per million in the last week compared to 5.57 in the UK and 4.28 in Belgium - but its economy has taken a smaller hit than Britain's.

Sweden's death rate is actually currently the highest in the world. The national epidemiologist Anders Tegnell has also finally stated, that you simply can not achieve herd immunity against this disease without a vaccine. This statement came after the results of antibody tests, which were released the other day.

Sweden now has to face another consequence of its tactics: the neighbouring countries have declared they won't allow Swedish travellers across their borders for a while, and no travellers want to go to Sweden either, even though the busiest season for the Nordic countries tourism is just about to start.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Sweden now has to face another consequence of its tactics: the neighbouring countries have declared they won't allow Swedish travellers across their borders for a while, and no travellers want to go to Sweden either, even though the busiest season for the Nordic countries tourism is just about to start.

I don't think that's a consequence of their actions is it? Travel is pretty much shut down in Europe already as far as I know.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Where's my 100,000 yen Abe? You foolish man.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

zichi said "Sweden's death rate is currently the highest in Europe, with 6.08 deaths per million in the last week compared to 5.57 in the UK and 4.28 in Belgium - but its economy has taken a smaller hit than Britain's."

There are some benefits for herd immunity, with risks. It is difficult to judge which way is better way, it is sovereign decision for the govt.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

marcelitoToday 03:44 pm JST

As long as Koike is mayor, Tokyo is doomed

I personally think she did much much better job than Abe ....if anyone is a reason for doom look to the national government.

she ignored corona virus until Olympic Games were postponed, why she didn't wear any mask before March 25 even if corona virus arrived in Japan at the end of January and in February there was the Diamond Princess case ?

this is enough to say she's not better than other politicians, and remember she creates a party just to disturb LDP and after she didn't get as much votes as she expected she resigns "I come back to Tokyo government", very pathetic and insulting all the people who gave her their trusts.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

VinkeToday 10:26 pm JST

Sweden's death rate is actually currently the highest in the world.

sorry to disappoint you but Sweden has 384 deaths for 1,000,000 people

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

Belgium 793

Spain 596

Italy 535

UK 531

France 431

Sweden 384

and this shows that lock down was not the best solution

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Are handshakes a thing of the past?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ignorance is a terrible thing. Pandemic has been with humanity since the beginning of men and women. Have we ever stopped handshaking, kissing, and that thing ?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

she ( Koike ) ignored corona virus until Olympic Games were postponed, why she didn't wear any mask before March 25 even if corona virus arrived in Japan at the end of January and in February there was the Diamond Princess case ?

So did Abe.... he was only pushed into the OG postponement by pressure from overseas after stalling as long as he could...same with the belated state of emergency declaration . Once the Olympics were postponed Koike stepped up and showed proper leadership , same as the governors of Hokkaido and Osaka. Abe by contrast dithered and was behind the curve every step of the way.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why are people talking about death rate, is it important when talking about a deadly, fearsome disease?

The only thing that matters is the numbers of tests.

Japan btw has 6 deaths per million population according to worldometer.

So what, right?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Why are people talking about death rate, is it important when talking about a deadly, fearsome disease?

The only thing that matters is the numbers of tests.

Actually, what matters is the number of deaths, and the degree to which infected are affected.

Testing is a means to keep both of those things that matter under control. Testing is a means to the end, not the end in and of itself.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Should I ask for my Employer to provide me with Facemasks if they ask me to wear one ?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Should I ask for my Employer to provide me with Facemasks if they ask me to wear one ?

You shouldn't have to ask. What is deemed necessary in the workplace should be provided by the employer.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Hyogo:

Total confirmed cases out of the 10,312 tested 699 ...that is 1 in 15 people tested so far;

   or 1 in 7,812 residents of Hyogo Prefecture.

Total deaths 38 ... that is 1 in 18 confirmed cases; or 1 in 143,697 residents of Hyogo Prefecture.

What? Who made those conclusions, a first grader?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Thank god ! Looking forward to Monday !

0 ( +0 / -0 )

therougou

What? Who made those conclusions, a first grader?

新型コロナウイルスに感染した患者の発生状況, Hyogo Prefectural Government.

https://web.pref.hyogo.lg.jp/kk03/corona_hasseijyokyo.html

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Christopher GlenMay 21 11:03 am JST

At this point, it’s time to reopen. The cure is now worse than the prevention.

The flu is a more dangerous virus, and yet the economy isn’t shut every winter to slow it down. Nor are many people vaccinated against it.

COVID-19 IS dangerous, but people should go about their lives, using common-sense precautions.

Not sure about the rest of the world, but the US numbers show between 12k to 61k over the last 10 years, with the 2017-18 season being the worst at 61k.

The US flu season is also generally considered to be 8 months long.

We're less than 3 months into covid-19, and already at almost 95k.

Flu has a vaccination available.

Covid-19 does not.

Admittedly, I only spent a few minutes to figure this out at didn't look at worldwide data, but the US numbers are food for thought....

As for the economy... I'm torn. Without adequate protections(financial and otherwise) for at risk populations, I'm wary of the return to normalcy.

It wouldn't bother me one whit if folks wanted to return to work, as long as there were options for those choosing not to.

I'd love to see personal responsibility be recognized by the courts, in order to mitigate the slew of lawsuits sure to come, from folks who choose to return and have unfortunate consequences. Someone, somewhere down the road, will decide that their family member wouldn't have died if only the (name an institution), had been more responsible about covid. That isn't how personal choice works, but it will end up clogging up the courts anyhow.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Since people still insist the way Sweden is handling the infections is best, here some more info:

Sweden has a fatality rate of 310 deaths per one million citizens. For Germany the number is 90.

Of course other countries are doing worse, like Italy with 500 and Spain with 560.

I guess it all depends on how fast a lock-down was implemented and also on the health care system,

available resources, hospitals, doctors, nurses and so on.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Yeah, some countries are doing better than Sweden and many are doing much worst.

The important point about Sweden is that they did not overwhelm their hospitals while avoiding wrecking their economy.

I suspect their overall death rate when this pandemic is over will be lower than most countries.

Regarding the Covid19/flu comparisons, if one ignores the over 65 year olds, the flu is deadlier.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I suspect their overall death rate when this pandemic is over will be lower than most countries.

Sweden’s population is small. It will be lower than countries with large populations. Comparisons with other Scandinavian countries is useful here.

You talked about herd immunity a lot. One study found less than 10% of people in Stockholm have the antibodies. Nowhere near enough for herd immunity.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Raw Beer

Regarding the Covid19/flu comparisons, if one ignores the over 65 year olds, the flu is deadlier

Why ignore an important parameter when doing a comparison ?

Doesn't make any sense at all to me.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

You talked about herd immunity a lot. One study found less than 10% of people in Stockholm have the antibodies. Nowhere near enough for herd immunity.

Yeah, every place that mentions this refers to levels at the end of April. I wonder what the percentage is now.

Regardless, the percentage is certainly higher than it would have been with a strict lockdown.

This virus, unlike the flu, overwhelming kills old and sick people. I am not saying those deaths are not important, but rather that we should focus on protecting the vulnerable people and the rest of us can continue to maintain a viable economy and build up herd immunity. The other option is to lock down for years, since a vaccine would arrive at the earliest in a year or two (and might never arrive) and who knows how long it would take to vaccinate enough people; and we would have to lock down until then.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Strangerland

"Sweden now has to face another consequence of its tactics: the neighbouring countries have declared they won't allow Swedish travellers across their borders for a while, and no travellers want to go to Sweden either, even though the busiest season for the Nordic countries tourism is just about to start."

I don't think that's a consequence of their actions is it? Travel is pretty much shut down in Europe already as far as I know.

Actually yes it is. The said countries have explicitly said the Swedes are not welcome, because their actions have caused them to be “too risky” for others. 

And yes, of course travelling is pretty much stopped and borders shut as of now , but there are discussions going on for possible border re-openings for e.g. neighbouring countries. The main holiday season in the Nordic countries is between June and August.

@Cognac

"Sweden's death rate is actually currently the highest in the world."

sorry to disappoint you but Sweden has 384 deaths for 1,000,000 people

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

Belgium 793

Spain 596

Italy 535

UK 531

France 431

Sweden 384

and this shows that lock down was not the best solution

You’re right in the sense, that Sweden wasn’t “number 1” in the death toll list after all, but it’s got the silver price. The data has been corrected after my initial post, and it's about the data for this past week.The source for this is also Worldometer

UK 37,78 deaths per 1,000,000 people in a week

Sweden 36,27 deaths per 1,000,000 people in a week

Ecuador 32,44 deaths per 1,000,000 people in a week

USA 28,63 deaths per 1,000,000 people in a week

Brazil 27,38 deaths per 1,000,000 people in a week

(Here’s also an article by Daily Telegraph about this, although it still has the erroneus information that Sweden was No1, although it’s No2. Even so, not a good look for the Swedes. 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/05/20/sweden-becomes-country-highest-coronavirus-death-rate-per-capita/ )

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Actually yes it is. The said countries have explicitly said the Swedes are not welcome, because their actions have caused them to be “too risky” for others.

Have they? Where have they said this?

Also, how would Swedes be any more contagious than anyone else? No other group has herd immunity either.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites