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COVID-19 antibodies remain in human body for 6 months: study

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Encouraging.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

For at least six months. Good news.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

It would have been even better if the study also checked the cellular immunity, that last much longer, but still that a 97% of the people with mild or no symptoms still have detectable levels of antibodies tell us that eradicating the disease is not an impossible task as previously thought, very difficult still, but possible.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

The thing that always needs to be mentioned on this topic is that the cells that make the antibodies (B cells) can be very long-lived (memory B cells). Moreover, it would be weird if you body continued to make antibodies after the infection was resolved.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Does this mean we will need to get a yearly inoculation just like for influenza?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Yokohama City University has not found anything new, but confirmed with its own data a result that was recently published by overseas studies.  But now, with its own data, the team can go further into some research.

At the end of November, the results of an ongoing study from La Jolla Institute for Immunology in California (https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/17/health/coronavirus-immunity.html), was published. It suggests that immunity lasting at least 6-8 months could last for years.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Sounds great! Or maybe I should say too good to be true?

A friend of mine (US) with no pre-conditions is in hospital again with that darned virus.

Third time for him and he follows all the rules, regulations and so on!

Now, if someone out there can explain this to me.

Is it because (just maybe!) he didn't "produce" any anti-bodies?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Does this mean we will need to get a yearly inoculation just like for influenza?

Probably mean a mandatory 6-month Chimpanze mRNA vaccine.

there are also many studies suggesting secondary infection after 2 months. The virus also mutates.

stay healthy and fit, social distance, wash hands, avoid tight crowds, wear two masks at a time properly, don’t touch your face and enjoy outdoor life.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Now, if someone out there can explain this to me.

Is it because (just maybe!) he didn't "produce" any anti-bodies?

In general its likely he has some problem with his immunity, maybe a precondition that was not discovered or a long lasting consequence of the first time he was infected. For some people it is not even a new infection but the same one getting in and out of control.

Probably mean a mandatory 6-month Chimpanze mRNA vaccine.

no such a thing, before criticizing something you should make an effort to understand what it is correctly.

there are also many studies suggesting secondary infection after 2 months. The virus also mutates.

There are many studies that say very rare secondary infections occurs, the same as every other infectious disease, even those that give life-long immunity.

stay healthy and fit, social distance, wash hands, avoid tight crowds, wear two masks at a time properly, don’t touch your face and enjoy outdoor life.

...and get a safe and effective vaccine when it is available, you can do everything without problems and it would lower the risks of complications even more.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I'm just hoping that I have antibodies from when I had covid in August, and that they last until getting a vaccine next year.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The thing that always needs to be mentioned on this topic is that the cells that make the antibodies (B cells) can be very long-lived (memory B cells).

Those who recovered from the 1st SARS CoV (17 years ago) still have the memory cells that would protect them from reinfection today, and even from SARSCoV2 infection. I expect the same to be true for all those who recovered from Covid19, so no need for any vaccine, especially a rushed experimental one.

The really encouraging news is that this also applies to those who had mild or no symptoms. So herd immunity seems much more achievable, even without vaccines.

I wonder whether the 3% of asymptomatics with no antibodies after 6 months were infected in the first place. False positives perhaps?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

https://www.mydr.com.au/travel-health/vaccination-and-antibodies

We have had this discussion before.

It is normal for antibodies to a specific antigen, in a healthy individual, to be eliminated after several months. However, memory B cells retain the ability to quickly manufacture antibodies again, if the need to do so arises. So, what is needed are studies to find out how long the body is able to quickly respond to a reinfection of the virus which causes Covid-19.

Every 120 days all the red blood cells in the body are replaced. It should not be surprising that specific antibodies are also eliminated.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

When exposed to a new antigen, it normally takes at least three weeks to produce antibodies for the fight against infection. Thus, rather than look for specific antibodies after x number of months, it would be useful to see how long it takes the body to manufacture antibodies to the virus that causes Covid-19. If the body is able to rapidly manufacture massive amounts of new antibodies, even when antibodies had diminished beyond the ability to detect them, then we can assume the body still maintained immunity. If the body is unable to mount a rapid response to a reinfection, then we can assume that immunity did not last long.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Those who recovered from the 1st SARS CoV (17 years ago) still have the memory cells that would protect them from reinfection today, and even from SARSCoV2 infection. I expect the same to be true for all those who recovered from Covid19, so no need for any vaccine, especially a rushed experimental one.

You expect that because you have no experience nor knowledge about the topic, that is why you think evidence collected from patients that underwent a very severe disease from SARS must be the same as patients that are asymptomatic for COVID-19, that is not a valid conclusion.

And an approved vaccine by definition means it is less risky than the natural infection, so it is still quite necessary for anybody that wants to choose rationally the option of less risk. Specially because a vaccine that follows the same testing schedule of other vaccines that are in use right now without problems cannot be called rushed.

Your comparison of antibodies with erythrocytes is also mistaken, memory B cells can survive for decades continuously producing antibodies, the half life of antibodies against mumps or measles is longer than the human life.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

*The comparison, not yours.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

“Does this mean we will need to get a yearly inoculation just like for influenza?”

Never had a flu shot - and managed just fine. The difference here is we will be forced to keep taking Covid shots, and will have to prove we’ve had the latest to fly. Load of bollocks

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Never had a flu shot - and managed just fine. The difference here is we will be forced to keep taking Covid shots, and will have to prove we’ve had the latest to fly. Load of bollocks

There is no evidence that there will be any need for periodical COVID-19 shots, if you bothered to read this article that would have been clear to you.

And even now it is a requirement to be vaccinated to visit certain countries of the world, if you don't vaccinate you don't get a visa, as simple as that. Eventually you will be able to spend a lot more of money to check your immunity without need for a vaccine.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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