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Crown prince's accession to throne in 2019 to be one-off holiday

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National holiday or a non work holiday? The difference being what? Have to work being one or the other, or make up the time with overwork? Soo out of touch with actuality these government procumealations.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

10 consecutive days off from April 27 to May 6 in 2019

But !! If people stop working for that long, the economy will never recover !

0 ( +2 / -2 )

why does he have to wait for an entire year more than now?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

sf2k  - it's so calendar printers /  publishers et al have time to prepare as the new era has yet to be named.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Not just calendars, consider how many forms (government & private) use the Japanese year system, they all need to be reprinted.

Might also need some changes to software, etc.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

As the old Emperor was born in December and the new Emperor was born in February, and the changeover is on 30 April/1 May, there will be no Emperor's Birthday holiday in 2018. This is a reasonable solution.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It is only Japan that uses the era names which changes when the emperor changes (with some exceptions). China and Korea have renounced the system. The incumbent emperor is 125th. There are continued arguments whether we should continue to use our era names or should consolidate to western years so that we do not have to always remember two names of the year which is very confusing. When we use PC today, western year is required but not Japanese year. But when we go to public offices, we are required to write the era name. Japanese people who are against introducing western years claim Japan has its own history and merging into western years is to give up our history and live under the Christian history and tradition.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

"If the government chooses to make May 1 a "non-working day" April 30 and May 2 will remain as weekdays."

Guess we know which one they'll choose, then.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

But when we go to public offices, we are required to write the era name. 

There lies the problem, anything government related is stuck firmly in the past, whereas other organisations/businesses have actually realised that the 21st century has arrived.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Historical decisions take enormance consideration no matter the country, especially so within Asian cultures.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Might also need some changes to software...

Yes. Software need to be updated to handle conversion/display of the new era.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japanese people who are against introducing western years claim....

I have not seen any Japanese against using Western calendar system. It's introduced during the Meiji Restoration and has been deeply a part of Japanese culture ever since.

The Meiji government, established in 1868 after a lengthy revolution, undertook to modernize the nation by introducing Western ways. This included replacing the old lunar calendar with the Gregorian version in November 1872 (5th year of Meiji), which took effect the following year and continues in use today.

(http://www.ndl.go.jp/koyomi/e/introduction/index.html)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

socrateos

I am saying the inconveniences of the dual system.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

for calendars!? But if he died of natural causes it would be the same if he retired today! Seriously

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Good things about the era names are in many. We Japanese say I was born in Meiji, I was born in Taisho, I was born in Showa, I was born in Heisei and they are interpreted as having some kind of special characteristics in each group reflecting the air of the era. Difficulty is we know three or four eras back but we cannot recite the era names before that.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

yeah I'm from Showa era myself, so that's kinda fun. Like a realm rather than a continuous number. When Queen Elizabeth II passes away that will be quite an era change as well. But that will happen on its own. For Japan there is a case of being too orderly about it though, half the novelty of any era is when it randomly begins again

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Good things about the era names are in many. We Japanese say I was born in Meiji, I was born in Taisho, I was born in Showa, I was born in Heisei and they are interpreted as having some kind of special characteristics in each group reflecting the air of the era. Difficulty is we know three or four eras back but we cannot recite the era names before that.

Since the Showa era lasted over 60 years, I'm not convinced that people born in the Showa era have particular characteristics!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Schopenheur - interesting point.

I think also in some other countries the same is said, and felt, by the use of "the decades" as a determinant of age, life experience, interests etc. eg the 50's or 60's or 70's.........! This is added to by the use of other "tags" such as beat generation, baby boomers, generation X, millenials etc.

Similar such expressions of course exist in Japan, but from my experience they don't hold the same nuance as does the English usage.

I mean to be a child of the 60's or 70's in my home country tells a myriad of tales.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

i hate the fact that if a "national holiday" falls on a saturday, we don't get the friday off, but if it falls on a sunday, we do. the reasoning behind it is baffling.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

> Schopenhauer wrote: Good things about the era names are in many. We Japanese say I was born in Meiji, I was born in Taisho, I was born in Showa, I was born in Heisei and they are interpreted as having some kind of special characteristics in each group reflecting the air of the era.

That is true. But the same can be said for the Western calendar with, "I was born in the '60s" and "I'm a '80s kid. I grew up on New Wave."

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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