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Foreign dignitaries treated to Japanese traditional arts at banquet

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Maybe at another time, in another era, all this would have been OK

But in face of the recent natural disasters that ripped thru Japan, coupled with the impact of the increased taxes, the downturn in economy this insensitive self indulgence is beyond excessive.

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12 ( +16 / -4 )

Well this is good. Nice for Japan to be showing off their traditional culture like this to foreigners. Especially in the wake of the ascension to the throne.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Lucky guests! I can only dream of eating until I drop at an Imperial Banquet! Its a great promotion for Japan.

-13 ( +2 / -15 )

Wow... how about they spend this money on victims of the tyhpoon?

10 ( +12 / -2 )

I have to agree with SEMPERFI comment: in another age, perhaps all this was OK. But considering the fact that they have to represent and protect the tradition of Japan - as they declear (because they have no other function) - I think that the astronomical amount of money paid for the ceremony and the treatment of guests from abroad was better spent in a donation fund for the disaster hit areas. I understand that it is not their job to support financially the reconstruction, but I find it really a waste throwing away money in flight tickects, first class hotels and expensive obento (because at the end, to feed so many people at once, the only thing you can do is to prepare obento-like style stuff). Times changes , traditions too...

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Foreign dignitaries treated to Japanese traditional arts at banquet

"Treated".

4 ( +5 / -1 )

gogogo wrote: "Wow... how about they spend this money on victims of the tyhpoon?"

I tell you, they did.

There will always be storms and victims of storms but for life to go on, for a people to survive, there needs to be a sense that their people will go on no matter what happens to them, that there is a national hope. Rebuilding a few houses is nice, it gives a few people hope but traditions like this connect a people to their past and lets them see that their culture, their spirit, will stretch into the future no matter how bleak the present. It gives hope to an entire people that no matter how terrible life is for them, their people will survive, their people will go forward into the future.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

... traditions like this connect a people to their past and lets them see that their culture, their spirit, will stretch into the future no matter how bleak the present. It gives hope to an entire people that no matter how terrible life is for them, their people will survive, their people will go forward into the future.

Do people really think like that?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I agree but it seems like there are disasters every year.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

PerformingMonkeyT

Do people really think like that?

On the ball. No they don't. If you have a soaking house covered in mud, no power and are relying on neighbours etc to survive, then giving:

hope to an entire people that no matter how terrible life is for them, their people will survive, their people will go forward into the future.

really is the least of their concerns.

To be honest, if you have a look at the wide flat banquet hall in the photo, the low stage, and take into account that kyogen, kabuki and bunraku are all (ahem), acquired tastes, my guess is the audience will not have taken in much Japanese culture during this performance.
5 ( +5 / -0 )

"Foreign dignitaries treated at taxpayer expense to Japanese traditional arts at banquet..."

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Imagine if visitors were greeted at an English event by a jousting tournament or in the Congo by a row of shrunken heads?

Both regarded as of importance at certain times in history.

It is extremely tenuous to form contiguity with pursuits celebrated hundreds or thousands of years ago-especially when the audience is a select few, the esoteric is simply promulgated.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Japan is a country of many natural disasters and deep traditional events were involved those tragedies, too. People who don't know why that tradition still exist will feel boring the interpretations be endlessly long. But all of those Japanese traditions have the faces, for the art of good-luck and the tragedies...What is making the confusion is this Japan's modern world where people are puzzled with recent politics and economy events that erase the importance of traditional and typical local events. Legends, fables, virtual realities and finally all of what is this world from recent materialism effects.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I love the Kabuki and even in London and Amsterdam attended performances. Hope this all improves the international relations with those attending countries. They were always sell outs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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