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Freighter splits in two after running aground at port in Aomori Pref

27 Comments

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27 Comments
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Time to concrete the ocean floor as well as the mountains, rivers, and coastlines.

4 ( +13 / -9 )

Happened right in the port by the sounds of it.....wonder what kind of error caused the initial mishap....

Hope not too much oil etc gets leaked

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I've seen a movie like this happened. I'm surprised this really happened.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Incredible post typhoon winds up there on Wednesday.

Could be a factor.

The coastline in the northern Sanriku area is all cliffs, so it will be a very challenging clean up job.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

One word. "Made In Japan"(2008)

Made In Japan today isn't what it used to be like.

-18 ( +4 / -22 )

Looks like the hull welds failed behind the bulkhead separating the stern from the rest of the ship. Judging by how high she is sitting in the water, either she is unloaded or still well aground.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

at least it was only carrying wood chips, as a boat guy, you have to watch those charts and see if it is a supper low tide.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Apparently this ship was swept away by strong winds while anchored, resulting in running aground.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Kentarogaijin

Why do you imagine that the ship was built in Japan?..

https://www.balticshipping.com/vessel/imo/9370783

Name of the ship CRIMSON POLARIS

Year of build 2008

Builder TSUNEISHI SHIPBUILDING - TOKYO, JAPAN

.

And if it was built in Japan, what is the problem?..

A well-designed and built ship is not supposed to break in two when running aground. The only time a ship should break into two is when it's hit by a torpedo or an internal explosion.

no matter how strong it is, it can run aground or sink..

But not break into two.

-9 ( +5 / -14 )

Captain: “Don’t be daft, man, the depth gauge says we’re fine”

First Officer: “Sir, it’s in meters, not feet.”

Captain: 1m = 3.28 feet

First Officer: What ?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

A cargo ship made in Japan , with 21 Chinese and Filipino on board. What can possibly go wrong ?

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

A well-designed and built ship is not supposed to break in two when running aground. The only time a ship should break into two is when it's hit by a torpedo or an internal explosion.

Ships like this one often break in two for a number of reasons having to do with age, maintenance, load capacity, weather and much more. Running aground is a contributing factor of course. Other factors can only be determined by an investigation, by people who actually understand ships.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

History repeats itself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3m5qxZm_JqM

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If water got into the wood chips they could have swelled and that may have been the result we see in the pictures.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Humans doing what they do best . Destroying the planet through greed

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If water got into the wood chips they could have swelled

Yes, my dear, and because they immediately change then magically into oil, we see that oil instead of the swollen wooden chips on the surface. Something like that? lol

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

this ship was swept away by strong winds while anchored

Yes, of course, that’s exactly what anchoring means and anchors do. Omg

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I can see this being or becoming an environmentle disaster, not only will the fishing be affected, but the whole foodchain for the marine life. I just hope the fishing and marine agency gets its finger out and get the oil slick cordoned off quickly.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Ships often break in two when aground. It's a matter of physics. Maritime accidents are 99% caused by weather and/or human error. The construction of the vessel, especially where, is not a relevant factor. There are far more ship on the open seas built in China and South Korea, and naturally they comprise more of the Maritime Accidents than any other country for this reason alone.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

A well-designed and built ship is not supposed to break in two when running aground. The only time a ship should break into two is when it's hit by a torpedo or an internal explosion.

Sigh. The best built ship can hog (bend in the middle and break) if the bulk of its mass is only supported on one small area and it is being worked like a lever up and down, up and down over and over for hours or days by heavy waves such as a ship aground on rocks. The ocean is ultimately stronger than any ship made. During WWII the US Navy saw the bows break off a couple of heavy cruisers during typhoons late in the war. Post storm inspection revealed the bows of several others suffered heavy damage. The same storms caved in forward flight decks of fleet aircraft carriers and rolled several destroyers over with great loss of life.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

From a favorite maritime blog:

https://gcaptain.com/crimson-polaris-splits-in-two-off-japanese-port/

0 ( +0 / -0 )

One word. "Made In Japan"(2008)

Made In Japan today isn't what it used to be like.

Tell that to the passengers of the Golden Ray, Samsung No. 1, and Sewol.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

https://youtu.be/rHlEXn37dVg this vid clip just shows how much a ship is deisigned to bend and flex

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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