national

Gov't to urge male civil servants to take more than 1-month childcare leave

38 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

38 Comments
Login to comment

Well hey, there was a lot of talk about this issue. And now we’re seeing some action. And if this keeps up, we could see action across the entire Japanese workplace, not just civil servants.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

No, it won’t unless it becomes law...

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Urges are going to get you nowhere!

13 ( +13 / -0 )

On a personal note here, and from experience of having raised three children with my wife. The first week after the baby is born HERE, and if it's a typical childbirth not a c-section, Mom is in the hospital, so Dad really does not need a lot of time off, if the house is prepared for the baby.

Next the first week at home, is an adjustment and Mom needs a lot of help, but typically speaking from our experience, after that for about the first month, the baby just eats, sleeps, cries, and needs their diapers changed, it's after the first month that Mom needed more help, getting into a routine of raising the baby.

I was fortunate to work at a place that gave me time off as needed, and I actually took off MORE time 2nd and 3rd months after the kids were born.

Each family is different, and it's really important for Dad's to be involved with the early daily routines of helping Mom with the baby!

Any Dad that puts his work ahead of his wife and baby needs their head examined!

13 ( +14 / -1 )

Well hey, either way, it’s definitely a step in the right direction. That’s what I meant by that, no more no less.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

and to evaluate managers' performance based partly on how many subordinates take such leave, according to the sources.

This might make difference, if it's enforced.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

This might make difference, if it's enforced.

It will make a difference if it means that the managers pay will be affected if they dont let their people take time off!

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Won't happen, nice thought though

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The Japanese government will begin encouraging male civil service workers to take more than a month of childcare leave starting in fiscal 2020

What will happen to those employer direct and indirect superior if they decide to refuse or intimidate employee who want to take childcare leave? How about their coworker what measure to prevent them to bully these employee.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Yubaru-san, two thumbs up.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Yet another ‘urge’. We all remember Abe giving huge tax cuts to corporations and ‘urged’ them to pass in the tax cuts as salary increases to employees, which never happened. This is just more voter pacifying hot air from the ministry of BS.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

This is nice and all, and I know that Japan has far too many public servants, but this is useless unless it is enforced for all workers. Why Japan always does things only for public servants seems so unfair. I know, some will say, that is the only group they have immediate control over, to which I say, they are the damn government! They have control over everybody. They could write legislation making it mandatory that all companies have to let males take a month off to help with child rearing.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Ahahahahahahahahaha

My husband who works for the government can't even take off most public holidays, he was even in on New Years day last year, most of Golden Week, and recently the enthronement day. I imagine if he even told them he wanted to take a few DAYS off if I had another baby they would pitch a fit.

He even has to claim he has taken days off that he hasn't taken off otherwise they could get into legal trouble. They always say he can later take the days off without claiming them as compensation but it never happens. If he used his compiled unused "required" vacation days he could probably take off a few months straight.

We can all dream right?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

@MarkX

This is nice and all, and I know that Japan has far too many public servants, but this is useless unless it is enforced for all workers.

Japan is in fact known for having a relatively low number of national government civil servants.

They could write legislation making it mandatory that all companies have to let males take a month off to help with child rearing.

If they did, that would put Japan way ahead of the US which does not have mandatory legislation providing paid leave even for females.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2018/02/05/the-worlds-richest-countries-guarantee-mothers-more-than-a-year-of-paid-maternity-leave-the-u-s-guarantees-them-nothing/

@Yubaru

My experiences with two kids are similar. Guys don't need a block of time off unless there are complications. What guys need is to be able to take off time at short notice especially when the kids are in day care or the first few years of elementary school. Fortunately, I had a job that let me do this.

Since my wife had a work from home job, having me there for a solid month would have been detrimental to our marriage.

Specialists in childcare both Japanese and foreign know that this government push is PR driven. Bureaucrats are responding to mostly unjustified foreign criticism by trying to push up the stats in a highly visible way even if leave for fathers is in general not all that helpful.

It would be far more helpful to have less overtime and for it to be completely predictable but that would not show up as a single number that could be used for PR purposes.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

If people accept working under illegal conditions then it is their own fault.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Japan is in fact known for having a relatively low number of national government civil servants.

Huh? Where in the world did you get this information? Japan is notorious for having far too many public servants.

Over 2% of the population of this country IS in fact a public servant! And by the way that does not include, teachers, doctors, fire, police or JSDF nor all the inclusive and associated staff! Include those numbers and you have something close to 5% of the total population that is paid by taxpayers money!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

It would be far more helpful to have less overtime and for it to be completely predictable but that would not show up as a single number that could be used for PR purposes.

Overtime alone is not the problem, commute times take a huge chunk out of any given day, for many 2 hours or more daily, just to get back and forth to their jobs.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Stupid ideas spread faster than smart ideas, that is Japan today, unfortunately.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

If people accept working under illegal conditions then it is their own fault.

Um, do you not understand the concept of 'illegal'?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Since my wife had a work from home job, having me there for a solid month would have been detrimental to our marriage.

Some refreshing honesty!

Seriously though, many Japanese wives are territorial and see the home as their domain. They are quite happy for their husband to be off at work. Some of the same women will still criticize their husband to others for not doing housework.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Huh? Where in the world did you get this information? Japan is notorious for having far too many public servants.

False. By a mile I might add.

https://honkawa2.sakura.ne.jp/5190.html

http://honkawa2.sakura.ne.jp/5192.html

https://www.jinji.go.jp/pamfu/profeel/03_kazu.pdf

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

lipservice
1 ( +1 / -0 )

Although I can understand the cynics saying it wont happen, it is a clear message from the government that the practice of taking maternity leave is now officially your inalienable right. Top down cultures like this need the stamp of approval from above to keep the bully style buchos at bay and protect anyone who decides to use the leave. They will seriously think twice about trying to use intimidation tactics that until now may have been the norm. You don't want to go the road of forcing people to take the leave, nor can you change an entire corporate culture overnight but this will go far for those willing to take the time off.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Any Dad that puts his work ahead of his wife and baby needs their head examined!

Indeed...well said.

Japan is in fact known for having a relatively low number of national government civil servants.

Lol...now, seriously .

2 ( +2 / -0 )

From my observation of workplace practices & customs I'd suggest the biggest stumbling block to taking any leave that is due, or necessary, is the general mindset of the the whole work force.

Whether it be managers or seniors saying it can't be done or co-workers who not only grumble and whinge when people have time off - esp extended - but can be downright rude and shun the said person, everyone needs to re-evaluate their thinking in this.

Of course starting at the top is admirable, but until people accept that having owed or needed time off is the norm as a basic right of workers - all workers - then nothing much will change.

And possibly enforcement by law is the only way to go. Unions are too weak to even contemplate such as they are just collusionists with Inc & Co.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Browny is right. The whole mindset is wrong. I would blame management though. They have the power to shut down dissent from grumbling co-workers. They do not because it is useful in creating a "work above all else" culture. This is what people who do not fully understand productivity think is preferable.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

...evaluate managers' performance based partly on how many subordinates take such leave...

Wow. Finally taking some solid steps

0 ( +0 / -0 )

From my observation of workplace practices & customs I'd suggest the biggest stumbling block to taking any leave that is due, or necessary, is the general mindset of the the whole work force

THIS times a BILLION!!

Japanese are their OWN WORST enemies!! As others correctly point out ANYONE taking time off for ANY reason RISK being ostracized, bullied, having any hope for promotion RUINED!

Until J-society CHANGES it is its OWB worst enemy & will continue to decline & it is picking up speed rather quickly I would say!

Since my wife had a work from home job, having me there for a solid month would have been detrimental to our marriage.

HPenny, nice to realise  when you have become sodai gomi in your own home!!! Like I said Japanese are their OWN worst enemies!!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Yubara

"Any Dad that puts his work ahead of his wife and baby needs their head examined!"

Thats gonna be one long cue at the clinic! :0)

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I raised 3 kids and I never needed one full month off.

I needed time when needed. Some days off but a whole month would have been meaningless and detrimental to my job at that time.

Personally , I had each time 2 weeks or so and it was enough.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The funniest part of this is that they are urging people to take more time off; however, the recent law changes have made it more difficult for foreigners who are listed as civil servants to qualify for such leave.

Foreign males need to provide proof that they would still be employed in order to qualify for receiving pay during the paternity leave. However, the law that goes into effect next year has now made it where foreign civil servants are classified as part time and/or they can only be placed on 1 year contracts. Nothing renewable so in essence they will be completely unemployed the next year and must re-interview for their position.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

...and then allow their supervisors and colleagues to penalize them when they do...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I raised 3 kids and I never needed one full month off.

I needed time when needed. Some days off but a whole month would have been meaningless and detrimental to my job at that time.

I kind of agree. I think the problems with child-raising are seen too much in the context of these big things like paternity leave or childcare places for under threes. This ignores the fact that after the one month of paternity leave, the father may be back to coming home for eighteen years at 10pm with one family day off a year for undokai. Once the child leaves that under threes childcare place, its into nensho class with PTA meetings every month during office hours. Excessive expectations and demands on workers from workplaces and parents from schools and clubs happen for children of all ages. The dad being around for the first month or the kid getting (very expensive to provide) childcare for thirty months are far from the only problems.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I've always had a life long allergy to civil servants. I get a rash as soon as I walk in.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I needed time when needed. Some days off but a whole month would have been meaningless and detrimental to my job at that time.

Most of the time wasnt about "me" it was about my wife needing time for herself!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If people accept working under illegal conditions then it is their own fault.

its not that its how other staff bully you for taking it. My brother in law is a full time civil servant, which means unless he actually breaks the law they cant fire him for due cause. He took time off for the birth of his daughter, when he came back he had a staff member approach him demanding an apology that he make them work extra hrs for his absence. He basically with controlled anger told him, why! Im allowed to take time off under the law , if management wont find or pay for temporary replacement while Im taking my entitled leave then thats their fault, If you or any other worker wont take the leave your entitled to under the law that's your fault so GTFO of my face (in the polite annoyed Japanese way) nobody ever questions his actions to his face every again. Hes one of the very few yes men and he likes it that way, it great having a Japanese brother in law like that!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

seriously any father that cant take even a week off for the birth of their child even when its allowed under the law isnt really a father in my view.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Good way to deal with the over staffed government offices.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites