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M5.9 quake halts trains in Tokyo area; 32 injured

86 Comments
By MARI YAMAGUCHI

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Slept right through it. Hope everyone is okay!

9 ( +16 / -7 )

It was a decent shake, but after having a few, I was quite mellow and relaxed.

1 ( +12 / -11 )

Strongest since 2011.

12 ( +18 / -6 )

Was one of the bigger ones I’ve felt. Started with a large jolt and not a slow build up like most seem to. Quite a scary one.

17 ( +19 / -2 )

It was a strange one, 30 years here this one was interesting.

Could hear it rolling towards us here in North East Tokyo.

Like some heavy truck barreling down the small roads near the house.

Had time to jump up secure a few things then it hit!

Have to give credit to the earthquake construction system here. The house shook and rocked for some time but everything held together nicely.

27 ( +29 / -2 )

I haven't feel it, because I slept already.

But damned earthquakes, never get used to them.

4 ( +12 / -8 )

That was a decent shake for sure. Enough to get me out of bed and topple over a few small things in the house.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

It was big, but Tokyo is made for it. Happy to see PM Kishida jump into action.

-18 ( +9 / -27 )

Being trapped in a shaking elevator with booming and crunching and metal scraping sounds would be no fun

14 ( +19 / -5 )

Kishida already showing us he is a strong leader and giving everyone directions to read information to protect their lives. Bravo Kishida, that's how leadership is done!

-33 ( +5 / -38 )

Alan Bogglesworth 07:39 am JST

Kishida already showing us he is a strong leader and giving everyone directions. Bravo Kishida, that's how leadership is done!

Because we’d be completely lost if Kishida didn’t tell us to “check the latest information and take action to protect our lives.”

33 ( +37 / -4 )

Yes, agreed on being lost without Kishida's direction. It is really good to see the confident and decisive leadership. We can go into future with strong heart.

-33 ( +2 / -35 )

Kishida 'jumping into action'!?!?!

Hahaha. Oh dear dear

26 ( +29 / -3 )

Strongest since 2011.

yeah, my feeling exactly. brought back some scary memories

7 ( +9 / -2 )

After all the Kumamoto earthquakes, I got so sick of the alarms that I edited the app settings so that I would only be disturbed in the case of a "weak-6" or more on the Japanese scale. Anything less is more an annoyance than a danger, especially inside a modern Japanese structure. Yesterday's quake was M5.9 at 80km depth?! Pfft! Try M7.2 at 10km depth!

-18 ( +8 / -26 )

I don't know how anyone in Kanto could have slept right through that one. And the alarm came on my phone.........after the earthquake started.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

I was at work and had to hold on to the door to stay standing.

The alerts were going off like crazy, so it was loud , shaky and scary.

It was definitely the strongest since 2011

11 ( +13 / -2 )

Was lost because I forgot to check Kishida’s message on Twitter.

16 ( +20 / -4 )

The message on my phone said stay calm. Right after the screeching alert though of course.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

Because we’d be completely lost if Kishida didn’t tell us to “check the latest information and take action to protect our lives.”

Any suggestions on what he should have said?

Maybe he should’ve sent a special message to the English Speaking population of Tokyo who are weak with facts!!!

-10 ( +7 / -17 )

It was near houses made of bricks,with a garage, people in Chiba have American style home ,that are spacious,,not next too neighbors,the aftershock will be larger than the quake

-19 ( +0 / -19 )

We should all always be ready to deal with a powerful earthquake. Exit plans, what to do if you can not get home. If the loss of networks how to contact the family. At home emergency bags by the door.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

I was in the one in 2011 and many more before and after that did not bother or scare me, however, this one really shook me up. My bed did not sway which is the usual, however, bounced up and down like a ball and I could not even get off my bed instead I was thrown back on it. My phone went off with sirens and verbal warnings and the shaking just went to the core of my being. Let's see what happens from now.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

Knocked over my ocean theme clay sculptures. Turned off the gas at the source so had to reset it. Alan on the phone was 15 seconds late.

Then NHK came on and gave you directions if you were stuck in an elevator. Who watches tv in an elevator?

3 ( +9 / -6 )

bicycle sales go up again. :)

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Zichi the quake were in residential area,these people had brick houses,,we do not have earthquakes,where I live,but they had some manmade quake. cause by fracking Google Fracking Earthquakes

-15 ( +1 / -16 )

*After all the Kumamoto earthquakes, I got so sick of the alarms that I edited the app settings so that I would only be disturbed in the case of a "weak-6" or more on the Japanese scale. *Anything less is more an annoyance than a danger, especially inside a modern Japanese structure. Yesterday's quake was M5.9 at 80km depth?! Pfft! Try M7.2 at 10km depth

i have been through a lot of earthquakes my first experience was in 1985 when sent to Mexico city as part of a search and rescue team sent by my country.

I was also part of a local relief team thR went to Kobe after the Hanshin earthquake.

Your place may be solidly built but as we saw in Kobe it isn't always the earthquake but what comes after or with it, Fire and no water was a major factor in the damage and loos of life.

It is not a shrug your shoulders thing thinking your place is fine so ignore what may be going on around you.

The prudent this is to pay attention to the rest of the neighbourhood one house on fire no water can spell disaster even for your "modern Japanese structure.".

7 ( +13 / -6 )

Something was odd about this one. It wasn't shaking left and right it was up and down and for a long time.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Yrral

Today  08:39 am JST

It was near houses made of bricks,with a garage, people in Chiba have American style home ,that are spacious,,not next too neighbors,the aftershock will be larger than the quake

Today  08:54 am JST

Zichi the quake were in residential area,these people had brick houses,,we do not have earthquakes,where I live,but they had some manmade quake. cause by fracking Google Fracking Earthquakes

I do not know what you are talking about. You obviously do not live in Japan. Firstly, the earthquake was over a very large area and many prefectures (about 15). Involving all the people and all building types within.

There are no brick houses in Japan.

10 ( +16 / -6 )

Something was odd about this one. It wasn't shaking left and right it was up and down and for a long time.

There are many different types of earthquakes, I am no expert but those that seem to "bounce" can be especially dangerous in flood plains and reclaimed land as despite the building being made to withstand earthquakes these types of earthquakes can cause the ground to liquefy (liquefaction) which can cause the whole structure to sink, tilt or even fall over.

Much of Chiba and Tokyo are prime candidates for this happening.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

Didn’t feel it till my wife woke me up with a strong elbow to my ribs

3 ( +6 / -3 )

In my recollection the 2011 one was at least 10x stronger. Take this opportunity to earthquake proof your home and get supplies.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Felt a drop straight down on the sofa right before my phone alarm started going crazy and the shaking then started. Ever since being in the earthquake to hit San Francisco in 1989, and Tōhoku in 2011, I get nervous when we get a decent quake, wondering if the shaking will subside, or continue to build stronger and stronger as happened in those two huge earthquakes.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

There are no brick houses in Japan.

Oh, really? So I didn't just see my neighbors building a brick house next to mine then? Zichi, do you even live in Japan?! Clueless.

-22 ( +6 / -28 )

David Brent 

There are no brick houses in Japan.

Oh, really? So I didn't just see my neighbors building a brick house next to mine then? Zichi, do you even live in Japan?! Clueless.

Brick houses are very rare here, usually in previous foreign settlements. I am far from clueless. The wood frame is the most common followed by concrete. Brick houses do not do well in earthquakes.

17 ( +24 / -7 )

Oh, really? So I didn't just see my neighbors building a brick house next to mine then? Zichi, do you even live in Japan?! Clueless.

Take a closer look at those "bricks" 90% chance they are actually tiles that look like brick.

Actually birck buildings do not meet construction codes since 1981.

22 ( +25 / -3 )

All those people waiting for hours to catch a bus or a cab at 11:00-12:00 at night should go chill at a bar, netcafe or an all-night family restaurant. Stay in cheap capsule or business hotel. What's with this Japanese fascination with standing in long lines for hours?

5 ( +10 / -5 )

5.9 is bad especially in crowded cities like Tokyo, hope everyone is okay.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Many elevators automatically stopped, including those at Tokyo's metropolitan government building, temporarily trapping some people.

At 10:41pm?

Is it normal for them to be at office at that hour? Or do they work 24/7?

4 ( +7 / -3 )

David Brent

Japanese houses are constructed from timber 46%. fireproof timber 32%, concrete 22%. That leaves 2% for other materials.

All modern build houses have external cladding to look like a variety of materials like wood and brick.

Don't judge a house by its exterior.

The majority of bricklayers are building furnaces, not houses. They becoming in short supply because not enough younger people taking up the trade. The average age of a bricklayer is over 50.

12 ( +17 / -5 )

Kishida already showing us he is a strong leader and giving everyone directions to read information to protect their lives. Bravo Kishida, that's how leadership is done!

Yes, agreed on being lost without Kishida's direction. It is really good to see the confident and decisive leadership. We can go into future with strong heart.

ROFL...love your sense of humor and sarcasm guys..good one.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Is it normal for them to be at office at that hour? Or do they work 24/7?

I should think there would be a 24/7 skeleton staff at least, just for emergencies such as this one (thankfully) wasn't.

We were watching telly when the alerts on the screen, PC, two phones and an iPad all went off. By the time the shaking started I had a 35kg Dobermann sitting on my lap with his snout tucked under my arm, quaking in fear. The Shiba snored on oblivious.

the 2011 one was at least 10x stronger

The 2011 one was magnitude 9, this one was 5.9, 6.1 according to some reports. According to https://www.usgs.gov/natural-hazards/earthquake-hazards/science/earthquake-magnitude-energy-release-and-shaking-intensity?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects,  each whole number increase in magnitude represents a tenfold increase in measured amplitude, so 2011 was a good bit more than 10x stronger.

In terms of perception, where we live the 2011 quake registered as shindo 6+, while last night's was a mere 3. The maximum was 5+ in parts of Tokyo.

I hope this isn't the start of another round of strong earthquakes.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

David Brent, lived the Kyushu quakes. A 7.2 and its aftershocks will change your life forever. It's like PTSD - any shaking or loud sound will reactivate evacuation mode.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

It would be unsettling if living in one of the high rises in Tokyo and feeling any earthquakes. I prefer to live closer to the ground.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I lived on the 6th floor for the 1995 Great Hanshin one.You couldn't do anything but hope.It was real scary.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

The ‘experts’ were saying pretty quickly that this one was deep and had all the signs of a one-off. A strong aftershock would prove them wrong, but it’s held so far.

All the infrastructure is built with feedback from previous quakes. No system is perfect, but It is fascinating to watch how the whole thing goes so quickly into gear each time there’s a relatively strong earthquake. Early warnings were sent out, even though some arrived late. Within seconds the TV was warning of a possibility of a tsunami, and then two or three minutes later it was ‘Relax, no tsunami danger.’

1 ( +3 / -2 )

It woke my daughters up and shook them enough that they spent the rest of the night in my bedroom.

Thankfully the earthquake didn't cause too serious damage or injury. Though I do believe that the quake is the strongest one with the epicenter in the Tokyo Bay area for a few years now...

2 ( +3 / -1 )

the kids woke me up otherwise i don't think i would notice it.... have to be grateful for the Tokyo infrastructures... seems like everything still in tack

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Stay in cheap capsule or business hotel. What's with this Japanese fascination with standing in long lines for hours?

Families, home?

Some people care about getting to their loved ones, especially when you've had an earthquake.

I walked 25 kms in 2011 to get home to my family!

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Japan is an earthquake country. Earthquakes are happening hundreds of times every day but you don't feel those at all. The real big earthquakes have happened every (about) 90 years in the past. 1923 was last one. Last night was really nothing. If you are living in Japan, better prepare for something in case (if you want to survive).

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

I was in the middle of watching a very tense scene on Squid Game when it happened. Is it bad to say that I was more annoyed than anything else because it cause my Netflix to glitch out? In the middle of said aforementioned tense scene! Lol.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

1923 was last one.

I'm pretty sure 11/3/11 was the last real big one. Anyways, like everyone else, I got the screaching alarm on my phone there was a quake coming. Freaked me out a little, but I'm always wondering "Oh, how big is this one going to be?" I wouldn't say its exciting or thrilling, but perhaps more interestingly apprehensive is how I would describe it.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Just hope all those injured make a full recovery.

Also wonder if its related to the earthquakes all the way down in Melbourne

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@Matt there was a decent sized one over in LA just the other week.....the pacific ring of fire...that's all sides now had serious shakes.....

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@Kumagaijin

2011/3/11 was another big one for northeastern Japan, but not yet for central Japan and southwestern Japan. 1923 was on central Japan including Tokyo and Kanto area.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Oh, really? So I didn't just see my neighbors building a brick house next to mine then? 

No, you very probably didn’t.

Antiquesaving’s point about reclaimed land is an important one. I worked in Kaihim Makuhari ( reclaimed land ) for some time and the damage to pretty new office buildings was considerable. I knew one man there whose office had to close their ground floor for months after the 2011 quake - you had to take the outside stairs to the first floor to enter. Parts of the elevated footpaths in that area were closed off for quite a while.

Large quakes in and around the Tokyo Bay area are particularly concerning for those working or living on reclaimed land. Teenage trolling about these events being nothing is useless and boring.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I woke up just before the shaking started.....which was strange, but it wasn't my alarm....mines is set to a 5+ and where I live was only a shindo 4.......still not fun tho, especially since I live by the sea

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It was a bit scary. Large shaking when on the sofa watching a movie. I quickly put on a mask to ease the anxiety and make me feel safe.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

We have over three weeks of everything for survival and constantly updated because I like doing that! Even a six person size tent for the roof balcony…but what if not home?

Took me 8 hours to walk home from 3-11

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

@Kao! Funny mask comment. I laughed

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

LagunaToday 10:43 am JST

David Brent, lived the Kyushu quakes. A 7.2 and its aftershocks will change your life forever. It's like PTSD - any shaking or loud sound will reactivate evacuation mode.

I very much agree with that. Before 2011 earthquakes were for me a funny side of living in Japan, now I can feel my blood pressure going up doing a major quake. I think I realized that a lot can go wrong ...

6 ( +7 / -1 )

That was one heck of a jolt. I hope everyone is ok.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Japan's safety codes are great. I feel confident in any recently-built Japanese structure. Go take a look at the tragic videos of people fleeing the tsunamis on 11 March 2011 - a 9.0 Richter scale / 7 on the Japanese scale quake had hit nearby. (We know about the damage and even deaths in Tokyo, hundreds of kilometers away.) So close to the epicenter, there were no collapsed buildings. Prior to the waves, people were out in the street looking at the occasional downed sign, toppled brick wall, or fallen roof tiles.

The problem is an earthquake in the winter, when toppled kerosene heaters start fires and broken water mains reduce fire-fighting capability (as happened in Kobe in 1995). Or an earthquake during rainy season, which shakes the soft ground and creates landslides. Or, of course, tsunamis along the coast subsequent to an earthquake. Most of the lives lost in Japanese earthquakes over the last four decades have been from the fires, landslides and tsunami waves, and not from collapsed buildings.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

If you are not prepared with at least three weeks of survival, including a tent so you can hit a confining 7-11 parking lot to survive…I have a huge 70meter roof garden, blocked off from others entering than you should grow up and prepare. I have.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Had the quake occurred at a different time then there might have been more casualties

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

ShinkansenCaboose

If you are not prepared with at least three weeks of survival, including a tent so you can hit a confining 7-11 parking lot to survive…I have a huge 70meter roof garden, blocked off from others entering than you should grow up and prepare. I have.

better have a plan B in case your house or apartment block collapses in an earthquake.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

David BrentToday  09:28 am JST

There are no brick houses in Japan.

Oh, really? So I didn't just see my neighbors building a brick house next to mine then? Zichi, do you even live in Japan?! Clueless.

You did not because they would never get planning for it. What you might've seen them build is a metal frame steel reinforced breeze block building but no way a brick house, that'd be suicide. If it looks like a brick house it will be brick effect siding panels.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

better have a plan B in case your house or apartment block collapses in an earthquake.

My plan A,B and C.

Container located in the parking area in front of the house, 7 person tent with double roof, survival shovel and tools, Colman single burner unleaded gasoline type last far longer than gas canisters. ( Back-up alcohol type. Sleeping bags, food for several days mostly canned goods ( no rice needs to much cooking time and water) water extra collapsible water containers and surval high capacity water filters and treatment tablets, also have a Zodiac type inflatable hard bottom boat ( use mostly for lake fishing but lived between 2 rivers for decades and still live far to close to a major river) everything can be rolled out in one shot. Also water proof tape should be a must and Rock climbing rope is extremely handy for many uses.

If my time doing search and rescue in 1985 in Mexico city taught me anything, don't depend of the government if the capital city is hit hard!

If Tokyo get a big one expect to basically be on your own for sometime!

If you are limited on space I recommend a cast iron fry pan and a thick stainless steel pot for cooking both can be washed out quickly and burned near red hot to sterilize them without needing much.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

You did not because they would never get planning for it. What you might've seen them build is a metal frame steel reinforced breeze block building but no way a brick house, that'd be suicide. If it looks like a brick house it will be brick effect siding panels.

Here, you don't need to apologize:

http://www.kenbrick.co.jp/column/%E3%83%AC%E3%83%B3%E3%82%AC%E3%81%AE%E5%AE%B6%E3%82%92%E5%BB%BA%E3%81%A6%E3%81%9F%E3%81%84%EF%BC%81

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

It would be unsettling if living in one of the high rises in Tokyo and feeling any earthquakes. I prefer to live closer to the ground.

I'm in the bay area, in a high rise. Unsettling is a good way to describe last night.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The up and down shaking is caused by a p-wave I understand and these are most destructive. S-wave are less destructive to structures.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

David BrentToday  03:18 pm JST

You did not because they would never get planning for it. What you might've seen them build is a metal frame steel reinforced breeze block building but no way a brick house, that'd be suicide. If it looks like a brick house it will be brick effect siding panels.

Here, you don't need to apologize:

http://www.kenbrick.co.jp/column/%E3%83%AC%E3%83%B3%E3%82%AC%E3%81%AE%E5%AE%B6%E3%82%92%E5%BB%BA%E3%81%A6%E3%81%9F%E3%81%84%EF%BC%81

Lol those are steel reinforced block buildings mate.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

You did not because they would never get planning for it. What you might've seen them build is a metal frame steel reinforced breeze block building but no way a brick house, that'd be suicide. If it looks like a brick house it will be brick effect siding panels.

Here, you don't need to apologize:

Let this one go. The brick walls are closing in here.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

David BrentToday  03:18 pm JST

Guess you didn't read the article you posted.

As pointed out those are not traditional bricks as the writer claims, they are pseudo bricks.

Specifically designed to look like bricks with hollow points in order to pass reinforced steel rebarb throughout.

But in any case extremely rare and as the article you posted points out extremely expensive beyond the means of most Japanese home owners.

It's like my pointing out there is a house near my place that is all glass walls, yep there is, special order special type of glass, extremely expensive but not anything your typical Japanese resident lives in.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

David Brent

thank you for the very interesting link to brick houses by Kenbrick. Normally a brick house would be constructed from two single walls of brick and mortar. Tied into each other with metal plates.

Kenbrick are using a different method. First a normal timber frame is constructed. Then the outer brick wall is constructed which also uses reinforced steel bars and mortar to tie the brick wall together and tie the brick wall to the inner timber frame. Making it very strong in earthquakes.

All the bricks are imported from Australia.

The costs of the brick house are very good. I read the cost per tsubo is ¥700,000 per tsubo. Average size, 160 sq m or about 48 tsubo would cost ¥34 million and last 100 years maintenance free. Even twice the costs would make it cheaper than a timber house.

A similar house size of timber would cost about $1 million/tsubo. ¥48million. built to last 30 years.

A similar concrete house would cost ¥1.2 million to ¥1.8 million per tsubo. ¥58 million.

But this one company could not built enough houses.

The brick house would also have reduced heating and cooling costs. No mention of double glazing, also needed. And a well insulated roof.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Apparently 55,800 elevators tripped the emergency brakes, and 28 cases of people trapped inside were reported. All involved were released unharmed.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

In the early hours of yesterday a 5.7 magnitude earthquake hit Pakistan, killing 20 people and injuring dozen others. And now this quake, shaking the Tokyo metropolitan area with a 5.9 magnitude in the late hours also of yesterday.

Is something unusual happening deep underground? Earthquakes here and there, volcanic eruptions here and there. Is tectonic movement activated frantically across the globe all at once?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Since I was naked when the earthquake started, my first reaction, in contrary to any instructions, was to quickly put my boxers on.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Baradzed

Since I was naked when the earthquake started, my first reaction, in contrary to any instructions, was to quickly put my boxers on.

Keep a "onesie" near your bed for a rapid exit.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

In addition to always having your clothes nearby, here are a plethora of ideas from some veteran posters to help others survive:

*- @zichi 2:28pm: “ShinkansenCaboose…“better have a plan B in case your house or apartment block collapses in an earthquake.” *

[@8:40am: Turned off the gas at the source so had to reset it. Alan on the phone was 15 seconds late.*

*me?*]

*[@1:43pm “I prepared with at least 3 wks of survival, including a tent so you can hit a confining 7-11 parking lot to survive…I have a huge 70meter roof garden, blocked off from others entering than you should grow up and prepare. I have.]*

*[@12:49pm: **“We have over 3 weeks of everything for survival and constantly updated because I like doing that! Even a 6-person size tent for the roof balcony…but what if not home?” ] -*

Plan B@zichi ? - Perhaps call “Alan”, (IF he’s not being “tardy” again), the on-call, ‘personal’ driver always at the helm of the RV, who will take those ‘born with a golden spoon’ to the local kombini for some of the best oden while sitting out the aftershocks? - Of course, possibly hand out some leftover, discounted onigiri, Pocky and ¥10000 notes to support the local business and to help the less fortunate?

*- [“It is heated up in my RV when traveling. My driver knows all the great spots to stop to get Oden. Nothing wrong with cooking in a convenience store lot, but use a gas cooker at least.”*]

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@Kwatt

2011/3/11 was another big one for northeastern Japan, but not yet for central Japan and southwestern Japan. 1923 was on central Japan including Tokyo and Kanto area.

Obviously you weren’t in Tokyo on 3/11. It was a huge quake even this far away from the epicenter; I was on the 6th floor of a building in Ota Ward and honestly thought it was going to collapse. When I was finally able to evacuate the building, I saw black smoke in the sky because something in Odaiba was on fire. Aftershocks continued to shake the city for days, making me feel seasick just sitting down.

As someone else wrote above, I used to giggle at earthquakes until 3/11 happened. Now they freak me out because I never know if they’re going to be the next big one or not.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Hoping it's not a foreshock. ALWAYS be ready. ALWAYS be prepared.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It is concerning that lifts simply stop, trapping people inside. It should be possible to rig them with a mechanism that uses no power, gradually allowing gravity to bring the lift down to the next lowest floor, the doors being opened by tugging a couple of recesses.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

“It was big, but Tokyo is made for it”

Modern buildings in Tokyo can withstand major shaking however that cannot be said for the very old underground water pipes and not very efficient electrical supply lines that are connected to them,

In the case of a very big earthquake the modern skyscrapers will most likely remain upright however it is very likely there will not be water and electricity available for them. Imagine the people living on the higher floors with no water to drink/flush and no electricity to cook/use elevator….

The options to get away from Tokyo will be limited as well due to train lines/roads disruption because of physical damage and lack of electricity as well as fires (many of them possibly unmanageable because of lack of water due to broken pipes/loss of pressure).

Tokyo is definitely not made for it, just some of the buildings in Tokyo. Indeed Tokyo would be a difficult to escape trap after a big earthquake with limited resources and reduced evacuation options.

This is my opinion based on my knowledge of Japan and my profession (15+ years) of assessing risk/damage caused by natural disasters.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@Geo, (15+ years) of assessing risk/damage caused by natural disasters.

where would you say are the safest areas of Japan?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

My guess is Kokobunji; because they have ISO earthquake building codes, like i.e. 7 floors limit, they say, and they use a lot of backup generators, solar power, etc, and not far from yokota air base, (within base police jurisdiction zone) if base assistance is needed for americans, vets, etc.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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