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M6.9 quake hits northeastern Japan

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Nobody care(inside Japan) magnitude.. How much in jma??

-21 ( +6 / -27 )

Hopefully this is not a repeat of the big one! Covid-19 is too much already! Take care folks.

18 ( +19 / -1 )

Can we go back to calling it a tidal wave?Yes, technically it is not the tide but "Harbour wave" is not correct either. Remember the good old days when a 7.2 was massive. And what's a temblor for the non-American-centric amongst us?

-27 ( +7 / -34 )

The whole crisis machine swings into action. Impressive to see how quick they are to report and warn, but I do wonder how ordinary people can continue to live on such unpredictably shaky land.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

very strong, had our iPhone alerts going off and we are in Hyogo. Tsunami expected at high tide about 8:30 maybe 1 meter. Test those new sea walls.

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

Probably still from the 2011 massive earthquake.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

That was pretty strong in Tokyo. It must of have been a real shaker in Miyagi. Now bracing for a tsunami.

3 ( +12 / -9 )

bobcatfish - Can we go back to calling it a tidal wave?

There is no word in English to correctly describe a wave created by an earthquake. There are hundreds of words used in English that come from other languages, so why not use tsunami?

Hope everybody is safe.

19 ( +25 / -6 )

Again. When is Japan going to catch a break for once? Very unlucky.

Stay safe all!

8 ( +12 / -4 )

I just can NEVER get use to it, LOL

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

@ Do the hustle

For the same reason I don't call high school prostitution, compensated dating or sex slaves, comfort women.

-25 ( +5 / -30 )

Again. When is Japan going to catch a break for once? Very unlucky. 

Here in Japan we regularly get hit by earthquakes. You get heatwaves in Australia.

Nature. What does luck have to do with it?

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

@bobcatfish

You are a bit late with your linguistic protest. Tsunami was first used in English over 100 years ago, and has been the scientific word for waves caused by water displacement for many years.

14 ( +19 / -5 )

Another strong one...

Hoping no tsunami hits the coast, as per current alert.

Also hoping the “big one” is not happening anytime soon, Japan had enough disasters over the last 10 years, including the current pandemic.

Stay safe everyone.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

@bobcatfish

Have you never heard of a loan word before? “Tsunami” is a valid English word that came from the Japanese language. It’s in every English dictionary.

Today’s quake brought back memories of 3/11. I hope the reports of injuries stay low.

16 ( +17 / -1 )

The fastest reaction was TEPCOs denial. They must have a 24/7hr team.

i recommend stop Olympics and prepare Kanto for the big one.

i hope this one is just a baby shock, love to my friends in Tohoku.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

"Again. When is Japan going to catch a break for once? Very unlucky."

We don't need luck. We have Japanese Civil civil engineering. No reports of major damage. That is not luck. It is the results of Japanese tech and good policy.

-17 ( +5 / -22 )

All of us , who are living in Japan , know that from March to May is the so called Earthquake Season.

So let us not worry too much, because too much worrying about too many things (Earthquakes, pandemic,...) drives us crazy.

Just let us think positiv, hope for the best, that everyone will stay safe, and that an earthquake like 3/11 will never happen again!

-14 ( +5 / -19 )

There is no such thing as an earthquake season. They can happen at any time. The best you can do is be prepared.

The next big one will most likely be on the Nankai trough. If we are lucky it will just be the Yokai section, but the whole trough could go. Then there is the Sagami trough off Kanagawa that cause the Great Kanto quake. Then there are hundreds of smaller faults all over Japan.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

*That should be Tokai section

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Can we go back to calling it a tidal wave?

This is a Japanese focused news site, reporting on an earthquake that occurred in Japan, where a "tidal wave" is called a tsunami, and even though this is an English language site, basically every english speaker on the planet understands what a tsunami is... not sure I get what you are complaining about.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

What's with all the downvotes. This was a very serious situation.

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

I was laying on my couch enjoying the shaking ride

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

Shinkansen services stopped between Morioka and Omiya due to the earthquake :-(

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Japan exists because those plates are colliding with each other, pushing up and creating beautiful mountains, hot springs and unfortunately earthquakes. Earthquakes are part of Japan as much as anything else.

Stay safe the best you can.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

Here in North Chiba the quake started low & built up some & became very back & forth like if you were trying to stand on a skateboard rocking back & forth in slow-mo....was very long too.

Thankfully there doesnt appear to have been or much of a tsunami, stay safe

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Felt that one in Kumagaya. You know its big when it lasts longer than a few seconds. That one shook for almost a minute. I know because I recorded the shaking on my camera. You never know if its going to be the big one.

It does seem to be earthquake season. Sure, scientists will say its bs, but when over half of the largest quakes in recorded history happen from March to May, you just got to go with common sense. Even if Japan had a large quake every March for the next 50 years, scientists would still say there is no connection because they don't have enough data.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

 And what's a temblor for the non-American-centric amongst us?

You know you can always google a word you do not understand.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Stay safe everybody and brace for the aftershocks.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Can we go back to calling it a tidal wave?

This is a Japanese focused news site, reporting on an earthquake that occurred in Japan, where a "tidal wave" is called a tsunami, and even though this is an English language site, basically every english speaker on the planet understands what a tsunami is... not sure I get what you are complaining about.

For those inclined to dance on the heads of pins, like many other words borrowed from other languages which have become common in English usage, tsunami entered the English dictionary some time ago.

Though a quick Wikipedia check didn't pinpoint the date it gained that status, this was offered:

The term "tsunami" is a borrowing from the Japanese tsunami津波, meaning "harbour wave." For the plural, one can either follow ordinary English practice and add an s, or use an invariable plural as in the Japanese.[14] Some English speakers alter the word's initial /ts/ to an /s/ by dropping the "t," since English does not natively permit /ts/ at the beginning of words, though the original Japanese pronunciation is /ts/. 

Wikipedia also offered this:

In recent years, the term "tidal wave" has fallen out of favour, especially in the scientific community, because the causes of tsunamis have nothing to do with those of tides, which are produced by the gravitational pull of the moon and sun rather than the displacement of water. Although the meanings of "tidal" include "resembling"[16] or "having the form or character of"[17] the tides, use of the term tidal wave is discouraged by geologists and oceanographers. 

I guess that means we can wave that good-bye and use tsunami.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Philly-Tsunami had wide English acceptance by the mid 60's.

In University in the 70's, it was always tsunami, never tidal wave (and yes, I took some geology/earth sciences/climate courses)

3 ( +4 / -1 )

In Tokyo, I was cycling at the time and completely oblivious to what was going on at the time - according to WNI, it was only a 3 here, though I wonder had I been cycling in Osaki, where it was a 5, would I have noticed it ?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@philly1 - in England, we don't normally have Earthquakes, let alone offshore ones that give rise to offshore surges - so having a single word to describe such an event is understandable. However Tidal Waves are expected, especially in areas which have particular geological features, such as the Severn bore...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Severn_bore

0 ( +1 / -1 )

whoooole lotta shakin' goin' on!  on the south-eastern Bōsō..... and it was long, around 90 seconds. overlooking the beach, with nothing between the ocean an little old me, I do wonder about tsunamis....

safe! and counting my blessings.... (´ ▽`).。o♡

0 ( +0 / -0 )

For those inclined to dance on the heads of pins, like many other words borrowed from other languages which have become common in English usage, tsunami entered the English dictionary some time ago.

Though a quick Wikipedia check didn't pinpoint the date it gained that status, this was offered:

The term "tsunami" is a borrowing from the Japanese tsunami meaning "harbour wave." For the plural, one can either follow ordinary English practice and add an s, or use an invariable plural as in the Japanese.

Wikipedia also offered this:

In recent years, the term "tidal wave" has fallen out of favour, especially in the scientific community, because the causes of tsunamis have nothing to do with those of tides, which are produced by the gravitational pull of the moon and sun rather than the displacement of water. Although the meanings of "tidal" include "resembling" or "having the form or character of" the tides, use of the term tidal wave is discouraged by geologists and oceanographers. 

I guess that means we can safely wave less than acurate terminology good-bye and use tsunami.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ok, so 10 years ago in Feb there was a major Earthquake in New Zealand and then 2 weeks later was the big one in Japan. Experts say they were not related.

2 weeks ago there was another 7.3 Earthquake in New Zealand (or off the cost of it) and now the same thing here.

But of course they are not connected in any way.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I noticed that the background radiation had increased to 0.18 μSv here in Gunma this morning. I do not know if this is a result of the earthquake, but the last one did crack the containment vessel at the power station. Just saying.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I HATE EARTHQUAKES !!..

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Hello Kitty 321

Just saying what?

That is normal background radiation.

And if you mean the 2011 quake, it did not crack the containment vessel. The tsunami knocked out power to the cooling and the reactor went into meltdown. The buildings and reactor s survived the shaking.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

bobcatfish

Can we go back to calling it a tidal wave?Yes, technically it is not the tide but "Harbour wave" is not correct either

It is neither a "tidal wave" nor a "harbour wave". Why not just stick with Tsunami, a word that is firmly established in English.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hello Kitty

I noticed that the background radiation had increased to 0.18 μSv here in Gunma this morning. I do not know if this is a result of the earthquake, but the last one did crack the containment vessel at the power station

It did not. Where did get that misinformation from?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We have Japanese Civil civil engineering. No reports of major damage. That is not luck. It is the results of Japanese tech and good policy.

Should share some of that awesome tech and policy with the nuclear plant operators then, they are shoddy on so many levels.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Because of the earthquake which caused the tsunami in 2011, there are holes and cracks and what he used to be a containment vessels. I hope these recent earthquakes didn't make it worse.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We have Japanese Civil civil engineering. No reports of major damage. That is not luck. It is the results of Japanese tech and good policy.

Oh yes, the Japanese civil engineers…….the same category that projected and constructed, and underestimated the height of the tsunami barrier at Fukushima nuclear plant?

Maybe the same engineers that placed the diesel emergency engines for the reactors’ cooling systems (of Fukushima nuclear plant) in a low spot, resulting in their submersion and non-operativity during the tsunami?

Or maybe the same civil engineers that project the cardboard-like houses of Japan, that in 2021 still does not have decent insulation?

Yes, really trustable engineers.

Peter Yanev, one of the world’s famous consultants concerning nuclear plants' security and design, was very critical of the design/project/safety of the Fukushima nuclear plant. Maybe he is not in agreement about relying too much on your beloved Japanese civil engineers.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

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