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Man donates ¥60 mil in cash to city in Kanagawa

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Usually the governemnt is the one that supports people during pandemics. But since it's doing nothing, donation has become reversed.

24 ( +27 / -3 )

Confused: Headline says ¥6 million. Post says ¥60 million. Which one was it?

26 ( +27 / -1 )

Readers, we apologize for the typo in the headline. ¥60 million is the correct amount, not ¥6 million as was first stated.

Hopefully they don't build a giant squid with it.

43 ( +48 / -5 )

The city will probably use this cash for unwanted or unnecessary things! It’s just a shame that people donate to city offices instead of some charity organizations where the money will be used properly!!!

30 ( +36 / -6 )

It’s an incredibly generous donation. I just hope the city actually does something good with the money.

22 ( +24 / -2 )

"We found 60 million yen in cash inside and a letter saying 'This is the money I've been saving since the first grade. Please make use of it. It's a donation,'" said the official.

Mayor Katsuaki Kamiji: And this time we didn't even have to pretend we are working in the public service.

The people who donate money to the city governments or police are sadly misguided. There are so many more deserving recipients or places where it would do so much good rather than the coffers of bureaucracy.

23 ( +25 / -2 )

Which is it: “Found” or “Saved”?

“We found 60 million yen in cash inside and a letter saying 'This is the money I've been saving since the first grade.” -

-11 ( +3 / -14 )

When there are so many people to whom the money could have been given directly?:

- “as the economy reels from the fallout of the coronavirus pandemic.” -

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Actually pretty dumb move by that person, handing over money to inept government officials. Hey guys its bonus money, let’s go to Ginza!

32 ( +36 / -4 )

Most look like new bills. The NPA normally depicts everything found or confiscated.

- “...an unexpected financial windfall [for] a city in Kanagawa Prefecture”

Anonymity is important but why not show a photo of the letter, the backpack and the money?

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Something is amiss.

- "We've never received such a big donation from an anonymous person," the official added. -

An impromptu courtesy ‘audit’ should be done by an outside agency? Perhaps(?) someone at city hall lost track er,... ‘misplaced’ some funds, here and there, over the years?

6 ( +8 / -2 )

@Chili, you don't have to insult all government officials. i know plenty of people from my schooldays who wishes to work for the government and do good. And there are countless cities and towns in japan. Some mayors or governors are beloved by their people. And there are a lot of offcials who has kind hearts and try to improve their cities.

Also i am actually worried for the old man. Just giving all his life savings like that. Either he is really well taken care of by his off springs or he is not planning to stay alive for long. I hope that i am worried for nothing, but maybe they should keep a eye on him and make sure he is truly properly taken care of after giving his life savings away.

7 ( +16 / -9 )

To be spent on a massive squid or other cephalopod to attract tourists!

12 ( +16 / -4 )

Which is it: “Found” or “Saved”?

Really now? It's clearly stated in the article. The good Samaritan old guy, "saved" the cash, and the people in the government office "found" it when then opened the bag.

They "noticed" it, they "observed" it, they "detected" it, they "saw" it, they "noticed" it, they are all synonyms for the word "found", so what would you have had them write instead?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Great to read first thing! Remember folks it’s nice to be nice!

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Too bad Mr "Anonymous" was unable to derive more pleasure from his generosity by putting his money gift to a more imaginative use instead of donating to clueless bureaucrats with a penchant for squandering monies on squids.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

News next week, ''Kanagawa mayor spends 60 million yen in kyabakura.''

13 ( +14 / -1 )

@snowymountainhell

Which is it: “Found” or “Saved”?

Well the government worker found the money in the bag, along with a note from the elderly man claiming that he had saved it since the first grade. I don't understand the confusion as the article was pretty clear on that.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Anyone checking on the welfare of the guy that donated it?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Since it was publicized, it is going to be very hard for any politician or city office employee to use the money for any BS reasons.

I am rather jealous, wish some "old" guy would drop off 6,000万円 in my mailbox! But then I would have to pay taxes on it! Better off if he just dropped off a cash card with the P.I.N.!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

And @porto 8:11am, ”the Article” reads clearly:

*- “The man, who did not identify himself, appeared at city hall in Yokosuka on Monday and asked that a backpack with a letter inside be given to the mayor, the official who met him told AFP.*

Also, from the article, the question remains:

*- “We found 60 million yen in cash inside and a letter saying 'This is the money I've been saving...” -*

Which is it: “Found” or “Saved” ?

*- @porto 8:11am: “Well the government worker found the money in the bag, along with a note from the elderly manclaiming that he had saved it since the first grade. I don't understand the confusion as the article was pretty clear on that.”*

Apparently, @porto 8:11am, you confused Yourself. It’s ok. No harm done.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Better off in a food bank or pet shelter, but I guess the guy was trying to help. How is he to know his money will get used to widen a sidewalk by an inch or two, or tarmac a playground.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Great point @gogogo 8:18am. Plenty of surveillance cameras inside and outside city hall.

- “Anyone checking on the welfare of the guy that donated it?” -

Greed” over use of the money should not be the the priority.

The NPA should be on this with all due speed.

We will ALL be looking for some follow-up reporting.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@gogogo

I was thinking the same thing. Seems ominous, hope he's ok.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Roughly $550,000 and of course thank you Sir with a big S.

If I had this extra savings, I would go to the nearest schools and give it to every child, then watch these kids smiles, to me that is the Ultimate thrill.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

JimToday 06:53 am JST

The city will probably use this cash for unwanted or unnecessary things! It’s just a shame that people donate to city offices instead of some charity organizations where the money will be used properly!!!

Better give it to the city hall as charities often use donation solely for self administration, most money is never arriving where it is needed.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

(As contrary to subversive opinion as this may sound)

What a gesture! The man is clearly proud of his city and the person it has made him - not enough of that in the world.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The “found or saved” question is about the true “origin” of the money.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Hopefully the money goes to where its truly needed and its made clear to the public. All too often in Japan (and other places) someone is awarded a contract to build or supply something who has connections to City Council.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Better off in a food bank or pet shelter, but I guess the guy was trying to help.

This is just a copycat occurrence that we hear about happening once or twice a year in Japan. There are elderly people with the utmost trust in the government and that they can do no wrong. I never donate money to the government or organizations because I have trust issues with the hands that the money passes through. If I was rich and was donating money towards people struggling with the pandemic, I would help out the restaurants, izakaya and stores that I frequent and know are struggling.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

This is real charity, one that doesn’t seek recognition.

The naysayers will crow, they’ve probably not contributed a dime to charity in their lives!!!

1 ( +5 / -4 )

He left a note inside saying he wanted the money to be used to help the poor and fund education,

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I wonder if he can remember giving the money.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Which is it: “Found” or “Saved” ?

Ok

*We found 60 million yen in cash inside and a letter saying 'This is the money I've been saving...” -**

Try this, "He saved it" (Which is clearly stated "This is the money I've been saving........) and "They found it" (Which is also clearly stated, "We found 60 million in cash inside......)

Where is your confusion?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Most foreign people don’t know that when a Japanese person dies, 50% goes to death tax for the LDP.

My very good friend and her sister became homeless because when their parents suddenly died, they lost their family home and got into debt.

i think old people, who know they are reaching the end, should donate their savings to their personal choice

4 ( +7 / -3 )

 how the HELL does an old guy end up with 60mil in ca$h)

Seems you dont know much about how famous Japanese are for hoarding cash.

Read the article, he said he has been saving money since elementary school! Not to mention that at his age, depending totally upon what he did for a living, he very well may have received at least 20 to 30 million in his "taishoku kin" when he retired.

Heck I have some relatives who both worked in the city office as koumuin, they received nearly 60 million in their taishokukin, and built a new house, paying cash for it!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It seems to me that the city should be required to verify the source of this money. While it’s extremely likely the money was legitimately earned, it’s not a guarantee simply because an elderly man donated it and it makes everyone feel good.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Donations of any kind should go through the official channels; dumping monies in a bag at city hall is NOT the way to donate (for a whole host of reasons). In fact, I would urge the city officials to check to make sure the donor is of sound mind before accepting his money.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

If I received such cash I would not spend it and keep it for hard times .

I wonder what will the mayor use it for.

hope it’s not spent in hostess bars .

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@snowymountainhell

Well, according to article it is plain.

The man dropped off the bag.

The official(s) opened the bag and found the money in the bag with a letter presumably from the man.

The letter said the man saved the money since first grade. You'll have to ask the man how true that is.

I'm not confused about what the article says. The way you wrote your question makes it seem that you are confused about who is the subject of found and who is the subject of saved. The article is clear, your question was not.

It's okay. No harm done.

Might I suggest changing the wording of your question to "Did the man really save the money?"

2 ( +2 / -0 )

You made that clear @Yubaru 7:56am and @porto 8:11am. There’s no more confusion now.

*- “They "noticed" it, they "observed" it, they "detected" it, they "saw" it, they "noticed" it, they are all synonyms for the word "found",...” -*

Agreed. Your synonyms are much clearer than the poor choice of “found” in the same story. The initial writing @6:30 had typos/errors and was amended later. So, therefore, we also apologized for any of our false presumption/sarcasm based on errors but those posts have been removed.

You really make the point of stating “They noticed it.twice. So, “Agreed”, the writer should have used the word ‘noticed’. Let’s remember, the writers, editors and commenters are not infallible. No harm done.

In conclusion, do you agree with these more clearly, stated questions:

What is the true “origin” of the money?

Can this man and his current well-being be determined?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Agreed and retracted, @porto 10:03am,

- @porto 10:03am -“Might I suggest changing the wording of your question to "Did the man really save the money?" -

as stated above @10:10am:

- “In conclusion, do you agree with these more clearly, stated questions: What is the true “origin” of the money?  Can this man and his current well-being be determined?” -

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@snowymountainhell

Yes, your question is more clear.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In Japan, inheritance of money is heavily taxed for both who bequeath and inherited. He might have thought it is better to donate than being taxed. Also, he donated cash. He might have kept the money at him to avoid tax. If the money is at the bank, move of the savings will be easily traced by the tax office.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

"We found 60 million yen in cash inside and a letter saying 'This is the money I've been saving since the first grade. Please make use of it. It's a donation,'" said the official.

Mayor : Close up shop, boys! We're going drinking!

Official : But sir, its 9:13am!

Mayor : Well its 9:13pm somewhere! Its a celebration!

Now let's hope that nobody will be rolling out with the new car and coming back with suntans because I honestly hope it is put to good use! It could be used to buy food to replenish the homeless shelter, more food for the foreigners in those horrible death camps....I mean detention centers

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Heck I have some relatives who both worked in the city office as koumuin, they received nearly 60 million in their taishokukin, and built a new house, paying cash for it!

Above is a perfect example why NOT to give $$ to govt, it evaporates quickly!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Now, @porto 10;23am, IF only @Yubaru-san can forgive the unintended ‘insolence’ from a humbled, yet, inexperienced and uninitiated ‘foreigner’ in our shared, oft-reminded, ‘host country’.

Can we presume:

- “taishoku kin" when he retired [and] worked in the city office as “koumuin” -

to interpret “taishokukin” as ‘retirement’ payment, bonus, pensions?

to interpret “koumuin” as city, municipal, prefectural or ‘general’ government worker?

We wouldn’t want to unintentionally claim they’re synonymous if they’re not.

Perhaps @Hiro 7:23am, (with all due respect to his friends), can also clarify these terms and the ‘famous’ Japanese “cash-hoarding” alluded to by @Yubaru-san 9:43am?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Oh! @P. Smith 9:49am expresses it well:

*- “It seems to me that the city should be required to verify the source of this money. While it’s extremely likely the money was legitimately earned, *it’s not a guarantee simply because an elderly man donated it and it makes everyone feel good.

and, also @Bungle 10:00am:

*- “Donations of any kind should go through the official channels; dumping monies in a bag at city hall is NOT the way to donate. In fact, I would urge the city officials to check to make sure the donor is of sound mind before accepting his money.*

Agreed. The origin of the money and the well-being of ‘the man’ should be determined immediately.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Maintaining ‘anonymity’ can be perceived as ‘virtuous’ and may encourage a ‘*spirit of selfless donating*’, yet, accepting...

*- “The man, who did not identify himself, appeared at city hall and asked that a backpack with a letter inside be given to the mayor” -*

... does not appear to be, from a ‘public safety’ standpoint, practical nor advisable.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What is the true “origin” of the money?

What difference does it make? It is not uncommon here in Japan to read stories like this, about people who, for whatever reason, donate money, or "goods" anonymously to a variety of places.

does not appear to be, from a ‘public safety’ standpoint, practical nor advisable.

Let me guess, you dont live or work in Japan. People here are not as suspicious as you obviously are.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Perhaps the more experience, ‘residents’ here can clarify to laws and procedures concerning rights to “unclaimed and/or found property”?

@Bungle 10:00am also makes an additional, valid point:

- “...dumping a bag at city hall is NOT the way (for a whole host of reasons).” -

Many unconfirmed ‘accounts’ since Monday about a Shiga man who just found a suitcase along the shore, took it home and opened it, hoping for some kind of similar ‘financial windfall’. The “case” is currently under criminal investigation now that city officials have viewed the “contents” and, in turn, contacted police. For some odd reason, he contacted the city hall First, before calling the police? Would he have had ‘claim’ IF it had been unidentifiable cash?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

No good deed ever goes unpunished here among the JT regulars.

Good for him, I don't see any of the haters donating one penny to any organizations to help.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

It is interesting to see "donating" this amount of money without further checks is permitted. As other posters have noted, the welfare and mind of the person need to be checked. Shouldn't any money donated have a tax receipt? Donations are tax-deductible. Is money from legal purposes? The government should not just accept payments just because someone wants to give it to them but have some governance over the process. If they don't have governance, then return the money.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The gentleman obviously has more faith in his local government's ability to spend money wisely than I have in mine.

While there is no actual need to know, it would be interesting to know how he managed to amass this sum. This is not because I think it is suspicious, but because I think it may illustrate how much times have changed regarding earnings relative to the cost of living. Fifty years ago, it might have been able to build a tasty sum from "just saving" or compound interest or a job with taishokukin, but the odds are much more heavily stacked against doing that now. You can still get rich now, but you're going to have to gamble on something that can go down as well as up, real estate, stocks, crypto, precious metals, ... You can't just stick money in a savings account and let compounding do the rest.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Goodlucktoyou

Most foreign people don’t know that when a Japanese person dies, 50% goes to death tax for the LDP.

No money ever goes to the LPD. It goes to the government of the day. You don't pay 50% inheritance tax. Depends on the amounts involved with a sliding scale.

"Inheritance tax (sōzokuzei) in Japan is a tax paid by someone who inherits money or property from someone who has died. In Japan, it is paid as a national tax (between 10 and 55% after an exemption of ¥30 million + ¥6 million per heir is deducted from the estate)."

Estate worth ¥100 million divided over five heirs. Tax will be due on ¥40 million. The tax is due on the ¥40 million will the 20% rate. That would be ¥8 million.

An estate of ¥100 million left to five heirs would only pay a tax of ¥8 million. ¥92 million without any taxation.

https://englishlawyersjapan.com/inheritance-tax-in-japan/

You are welcome!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@snowymountainhell

Yes we should question the origin of the money. Yes the wellbeing of the man who (allegedly) donated it should be determined as well.

My original problem was that your question was unclear at first. Now that your question is clear, there is no need to be hostile. A misunderstanding was cleared up. I'm sorry that you feel attacked for being misunderstood.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

If one morning you open your door and discover a bag of cash it does not automatically belong to you. You must inform the police and hand the cash over to them. Not doing so would be a criminal offence. You also file a report which will be investigated. If no one claims the cash after 6 months then it is yours. You must declare for tax. If the money is claimed it would require substantial proof then you are entitled to a 15% reward. This also applies wherever you might find a bag of cash. If you find it on the garbage collection point, move it down the road because the local authority will claim all those bags belong to them.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Fine @Yubaru. We acquiesced, enjoyed the “crow-filled, humble pie” of Your English tutelage (@10:10am) and showed respect (@10:46am) to your expressed ‘superiority in matters pertaining to Japan”.

“Let me guess, you dont live or work in Japan.” -

No need to guess. We, “Occidentals from the West” often question many aspects of the culture here. (Perhaps you didn’t read our response and questions @10:46am?)

So, now then, was that traditional ‘dogeza and moushiwake’ enough? Or would you also have us fully prostrate ourselves before You and the other ‘veteran’ posters?

“Perhaps the more experience, ‘residents’ here can clarify to laws and procedures concerning rights to “unclaimed and/or found property”?

Please ‘anoint’ us your wisdom about these unambiguous Japanese laws, IF there are any.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Thank you, @zichi 12:12pm.(As always, You and @Antiquesaviung often appear the most sensible.)

- “If one morning you open your door and discover a bag of cash it does not automatically belong to you. You must inform the police and hand the cash over to them. Not doing so would be a criminal offence. You also file a report which will be investigated.

- “ If no one claims the cash after 6 months then it is yours. You must declare for tax. If the money is claimed it would require substantial proof then you are entitled to a 15% reward.

- “This also applies wherever you might find a bag of cash. If you find it on the garbage collection point, move it down the road because the local authority will claim all those bags belong to them.

The guy in Shiga Monday may have done a variation your latter scenario then, city hall called the police.

Plus, if you’re ‘caught’ having moving it from the ‘found’ location, is that also a ‘false report’ and a “criminal offense’?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Understood, kind sir or madam @porto 12:04pm.

- “Yes, we should question the origin of the money. Yes, the wellbeing of the man who (allegedly) donated it should be determined, as well.

- “My original problem was that your question was unclear at first. Now that your question is clear, A misunderstanding was cleared up.” -

Admittedly, we have engaged some posters for their specific comments. We can’t tolerate when some are attacked because ‘English is a second language’ for many of us. (Reading and writing in English is a daily exercise to improve.)

Mostly, our questions and reservations about these articles are often with the way things are presented by the media and not necessarily with the individual commenters. What many here forget: Japan, it’s people, culture and policies are in flux, making this life here, ‘a learning experience that will never end’. We can never completely ‘think’ and ‘behave; as Japanese people do.

What we do expect is the journalists feel a sense of responsibility and also, be held to a certain accountability. They influence public perceptions and opinions about Japan. ‘Aren't we all here to learn from and help the Japanese people?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"Good for him, I don't see any of the haters donating one penny to any organizations to help."

Well said.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Many here today are just ‘questioning’ the overall ‘circumstances’ @Eisenach 1:22p, yet, NONE can be reprimanded by You and @oldman_13 as Your so-called “haters”:

- "Good for him, I don't see any of the haters donating one penny to any organizations to help.“Well said.” -

May we ask: ”Haters” of what?

And, with respect to this story, to where and what should Your donations be made?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

City office: hey guys we just got a donation of 60million yen from some person!

Also city office: what's our city mascot? I have an idea...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Seems disingenuous @Eisenach 1:22pm to often comment about the posters on this thread and then, flutter away with no followup. We are awaiting your lessons here on this Japanese custom of presumedly, ‘non-taxable, anonymous monetary donations’ and the laws concerning them plus, yesterday’s challenge for a follow up with Japan’s NPA and Ministry of Justice statistics on ‘certain crimes’?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

First order of business will be to decide how big of a cut the mayor and other city officials will get as a “bonus”.

One wad per person sounds like a “reasonable” start.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

My first thought, there are still generous people in this world who believe the gov will respectfully use the money for good.

My second thought, it's a way of returning money that was originally embezzled, to make the books straight. Something a bit fishy with the story.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Maybe try a charity or NGO........anything that will use the money for better purposes!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

What a waste !!!

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

GoodlucktoyouToday 09:40 am JST

Most foreign people don’t know that when a Japanese person dies, 50% goes to death tax for the LDP.

My very good friend and her sister became homeless because when their parents suddenly died, they lost their family home and got into debt.

Something is here seriously wrong with this story, lot of information missing. Nobody gets homeless and in debts because becoming the heir of a property in Japan.

Who was the owner of this family home - land and house? Who was the heir in law? Was there still mortgage/loan on it? etc. There are serious tax-breaks concerning interitance of a house/land depending on circumstances, especially for family members still living within the same property.

In our case, my Japanese wife and her brother decided to sell the house/land after the death of their parents and timing was good for me and wife, it happened just near to our own retirement a few years ago. We were already planning to move out of Tokyo and to buy our own home.

We were living in the same house/rooms as the late parents (the father was owning the land 100 percent, no other debts) of my Japanese wife, after all tax deduction, we paid only about 1 % of the total value of the house/land, her brother was not living with the parents, had his own home with his family paid about 6 %.

The property was sold for about 90 million yen, after paying for all taxes and for some other fees like removing the old wooden structure, about 78 million net were shared 50/50 - about 39 million yen for each of them.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

After that city hall has stocked up on new fax machines, they're going to have a great bonenkai this year. Might be a bit left over to fund the 46 people needed to monitor the road repair works.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I just hope that the mayor and his co workers spend the money wisely on people that are facing food shortages, or some one who is desperate for a small hand out, just to get them by, I would like to see a transparent audit trail as well, so if any one questions where has all that money gone? it can be accounted for, most of the poster on J news this morning, feel that the money might be used else where and might be used inapropretly. I would suggest that the money could be in a form of a loan and repaid with a small 3-4% intrest then this money could be reloaned again, just like a mini bank loan, and go on to help others.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I think, this money received by the city hall of rather questionable origin should be frozen for a few years and the person who donated should be identified. It cannot be so difficult, he must live somewhere nearby in that area. Not sure if this man had a clear mind or dementia when he donated this huge sum.

Such huge anonymous donations should be handled with care and reported to police, maybe as a procedure similar to lost and found - it's not like somebody gives away a few 10.000 yen bills.

There might be even a picture of him available, nowadays CCTV cameras are everywhere.

However very high donations are very common in Japan for restaurations of Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples for art or buying a grave etc. - but the donor will not remain anonymous, his name will be published within the property as a part of a fence, or listed on a stone tablet...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

KniknaknokkaerToday 02:53 pm JST

Maybe try a charity or NGO........anything that will use the money for better purposes!

Charities and NGOs cannot be trusted, most of donations is used solely for self administration and their bookkeeping is anything but transparent. Personally I still consider a city hall more trustworthy than any charity or NGO.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Did he prove that he was the rightful owner of all that cash?

Whose money was it really?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Interesting that anyone reasonably ‘questioning’ the ‘origin’ and eventual ‘disposition‘ of the funds, like @Lamilly 2:37pm...

- “My first thought, there are still generous people in this world who believe the gov will respectfully use the money for good. 

- “My second thought, it's a way of returning money that was originally embezzled, to make the books straight. Something a bit fishy with the story.”

... has been consistently downvoted since @1:22pm?

Agreed @BrianWheway 3:31pm:

- “a transparent audit trail”

and @Yohan 3:43pm:

- “money received by the city hall of rather questionable origin should be frozen for a few years and the person who donated should be identified.”

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Will there be tax owing on this windfall?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yeah, let's build a squid statue to help the population !

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Most foreign people don’t know that when a Japanese person dies, 50% goes to death tax for the LDP.

They don't know it because it isn't true. Not for most people, anyway.

To be liable to pay 50% death tax (which in Japanese is inheritance tax相続税 not death tax, the heirs pay it not the deceased) each heir needs to stand to inherit at least 600 million yen after deductions.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@snowymountainhell

I also don't condone attacking people who aren't native English speakers for poor English usage. That's bad form and doesn't allow for a healthy community. I think it's more beneficial to everyone to point out the mistake, have discussion, and come to an understanding. I agree with you about some of your points, now that they've been made clear.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If someone had done that in the UK, where local authorities are neither liked nor trusted, they would have evacuated the building and called the bomb squad to check the backpack.

It was a wonderful gesture, but like most people on here, I don't think handing money to local or national government officials is the best way to donate to the needy. A reputable charity is a better plan, but some charities are run like corporate entities, with all that that entails.

Aside from cash donations, I generally give anything I don't need to local charity shops. Charities benefit, as do purchasers and the environment, as second hand usage is a good thing. In return, you get some space back.

Amazon never really promoted their Wishlist feature, which allowed needy individuals and entities to request specific items. I wish they would, as it would allow all of us with a free moment and some spare cash to get books into school libraries or support community endeavours. There are also online crowd-funding services that allow individuals to support good causes.

The guy may not know many people and might not have much in the way of internet skills. He's done his best. The local authority should make a point of telling everyone what they did with the money - life-changing things for the needy that they would not normally have been able to do.

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There are still good people in Japan.

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Won’t help so much or even bring a negative effect, because that town or district is now considered much wealthier on paper or statistics average and therefore gets less the next seasons when the country or prefecture distributes financial support. No way, that such a city profits from it. You surely know from the sayings what happens to all suddenly outstanding nails here. lol

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@Michael Machida I wonder if he can remember giving the money. If the man can remember saving the money since first grade what makes you think he can't remember 70 - 80 years later that he donated it for his own cause? "We found 60 million yen in cash inside and a letter saying 'This is the money I've been saving since the first grade. Please make use of it. It's a donation,'" said the official.**

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His money would have been put to better use if he donated it to his favorite charities.

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