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Man ordered to pay damages for tweeting insults over late 'Terrace House' star

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In Japan its a common insult/swear word to tell someone to die. This needs to stop. Teachers and parents need to teach their young about this word. I used to teach with a young Japanese teacher at an elementary school and would scold her students and explain to them why its so bad to tell someone to die. This teachers sister took her own life.

28 ( +28 / -0 )

The slandered person is dead. How is it possible for the mother to collect on this?

-20 ( +8 / -28 )

I might did that in other countries it is not possible to slander/libel the dead. Japan is wrong on this.

-17 ( +7 / -24 )

whose name has not been publicly revealed

how come?

15 ( +17 / -2 )

The Japanese use of the term of 'slander' (中傷) confusingly seems to blur the distinction between criticism, insult, and slander - only one of which should be a civil offence. The trolls' comments were uncouth and spiteful, but the judgement is farcical. I can't help but wonder if this won't eventually be weaponized to silence criticism of government policy.

7 ( +14 / -7 )

Publish the names and faces of the scum who did this, let the world know who they are and that they can no longer hide, that would deter others!

5 ( +11 / -6 )

Great, good for Hana, Good Kyoko, and Good for all the innocent people who are getting bulled daily by coward scums who have nothing else to do but to bully and hurt other from behind their keyboards.

I hope more and more lawsuits like this are being filled.

-2 ( +8 / -10 )

Not much of a fine and name withheld.He'll live with that.And that money is for the mother? That will go in lawyer's fees.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

In Japan its a common insult/swear word to tell someone to die. This needs to stop. Teachers and parents need to teach their young about this word. I used to teach with a young Japanese teacher at an elementary school and would scold her students and explain to them why its so bad to tell someone to die. This teachers sister took her own life.

I see this pattern every now and then. Kids from a young age are used to joke with pals with words "shine!" "shindara?" "shineba ii noni" , all very lightly. This might be just another cultural trait I am still unable to decipher, a hint on how lightly they see their own lives.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Freedom of speech. If you're a celebrity, then you should realize that there are idiots out there who will say hateful things online. Either deal with it or don't put yourself out there on social media. There's multiple videos of celebrities reading all the hateful and hurtful things people post about them on social media, but I don't see all of them killing themselves over it.

Unless it's a specific and credible death threat, why are people being penalized and fined for internet postings?

8 ( +14 / -6 )

This is what I don't get, why is his name NOT revealed!?? why he did NOT appear in court!?? it seems as if the court is more concerned about the criminal safety than it is for the Victims.

He gets to remain anonymous while his victim and her family names are being paraded all over the news.

So UNFAIR.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

You can't slander the dead unless I am mistaken.

Also this article doesn't mention the cause of all this, the lady bullying and physically assaulting another member of the tv show who accidentally washed her clothing.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Great, good for Hana, Good Kyoko, and Good for all the innocent people who are getting bulled daily by coward scums

I think you should watch the video of what started this before talking about bullies.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

I do not condone the trollers actions at all but, celebrities - such as Kimura are in the public eye - should they not have thicker skin compared to the average person in regards to such comments. Again, it's tragic event but if one can't stand what's being said to them why not just get off the internet. RIP Kimura san.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

It is so typical to see people here trash Kimura instead of the scumbag. Sad.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

The guy sounds like a really pathetic piece of you know what. But his online postings, as insensitive and ugly as they may have been, they were just words. Isn’t free speech a thing in democratic Japan? This Hana Kimura had some serious mental issues to kill herself over online banter. I mean god, if that were the case then Justin Bieber would have killed himself a million times over for all the stuff people have posted about him over the years.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

I think you should watch the video of what started this before talking about bullies.

You mean what started on a scripted reality show that you get paid bonus money for fighting or kissing? It is one thing to dislike a person on TV and talk amongst the people you are watching with but those who take it a step further and criticize/threaten a person on their social media are absolute sickos.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

This comment will get a lot of hate, but at the end of the day, she did take her own life. She did not need to read these all of hate messages. I think the platform itself ''Twitter'' needs to pay some compensation for letting these messages through. These platforms can easily use AI to detect such hatefully messages and block them out. People will always say hatful things to each other, especially online. It's the platforms that need to do something about it. Not people to not give hate. It's just not possible.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Good. Twitter and other platforms of hate also need to be held responsible. You could never publish such comments in a traditional newspaper.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I think the problem is with the show forcing Hana Kimura to do nasty melodramatic things on camera and then putting the reputation of the show as depicting "reality" above protecting Kimura or anyone else on it from from a Twitterstorm-type backlash against her acted character.

Depression and suicides are proving to be very common for people who appear on reality tv shows. Very few people will be able to handle instant but highly ephemeral fame, and it will be worse when this fame comes from them being placed in a distorted situation, living with strangers, trying to cop off on a tropical island, or whatever, with others gawping at them. Reality tv is like Punch and Judy, it is specifically designed for you to get attached to the characters, cheering on some and booing others. With where we are now, this cheering and booing is naturally going to happen on social media.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

This article made me watch the video that lead to her criticism again.... slander the dead and say mean words is not good, but I kind of understand what the japanese felt watching that episode. Japanese or not, everyone here is tired of people snapping, getting angry and shouting mean words at you for abs nothing. I was tempted to leave Japan once because of situations like this, it almost felt to me as if some japanese are waiting their whole lives to “catch” someone doing the smallest mistake just to abuse and curse. A bicycle parked on the “wrong” spot for 5 minutes etc might lead to someone popping up from nowhere and start shouting at you and make a scene, virtue signaling with an angry face about the “trouble” you are causing to others..

”Nihon dayo koko wa!!” Sadly there is just too much people like this in Japan...

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

So stupid. These so called reality shows are bad news. The producers are the worst in my book

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The slandered person is dead. How is it possible for the mother to collect on this?

I haven't read the decision, but I assume the mother is suing as the legal representative of the estate of her daughter (which can execute any legal claims of a deceased person) and not in her own name. The money would not go to the mother, but to the estate, from which it would be distributed to whatever heirs she had (which might include the mother of course).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

One guy tells the victim when she was alive that she should kill herself. Ultimately she kills herself and this guy gets a slap on the wrist of 9,000 yen. A different guy, after she's already dead, says he's happy she's gone and he gets 1.29 million yen fine. Makes perfect sense ONLY in Japan..

9 ( +10 / -1 )

It's good to know that I can slander and push someone to kill themselves and only be fined 9,000 yen or at worst 129 man yen.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Isn’t written defamation termed “libel” in English?

I thought that “slander” applied only to spoken words.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The English translation above looks quite bland, but the original Japanese is written in deliberately rude, sneering and insulting language, with all honorifics and respect vocabulary cut out. If someone wrote about my daughter (alive or dead) like that I would be extremely angry, and even more if the 'person' declined to reveal themselves or appear in court. The fine is partly in recognition of the fact that this armchair warrior by refusing to appear or apologize will accept whatever is thrown at them.

See the use of 'anta' and 'omae' for anata, and 'ochinayo' for, I hope you Drop/fall into hell.

あんたの死でみんな幸せになったよ、ありがとう。テラハ楽しみにしてたのにおまえの自殺のせいで中止。最後まで迷惑をかけて何様? 地獄に落ちなよ

0 ( +3 / -3 )

PS And all apparently because their favorite show TERAHA got canceled.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Seems kinda stupid to me, with how many people on TV like comedians are constantly called fat, ugly, disgusting, creepy or stupid.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

She was already dead when he posted - no harm, no foul. Being a petty, heartless idiot isn't a crime. On the other hand, limiting freedom of speech, even speech of this type, is a greater threat than allowing it.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Poor taste? Yes

Unnecessary? Yes

Hurtful? Probably

Criminal? I don't think so.

I think the judge is wrong.

Hope I don't get fined for this opinion... :)

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Sad to read her story.

She was very focus on being loved and having a positive image on TV. You can't guarantee 100% the outcome you desire. It's not life or realistic expectation.

She also wanted to date someone on the show and it didn't go her way. It was a basketball player who was obvious a player.

The big drama on the show and the reason why she got bullied afterwards was because: '' Another house mate decided to wash his own clothes, while Hana forgot her costume inside, expensive custome made''. The house mate didn't check the washing machine before, accident not on purposely made.

The costume was ruined, she had a fight with the house mate, was very emotional.

Some people online decided to bully her 24/7. She was in lockdown alone during Covid. Reading negative comments all day.

I was a fan of Hana. I thought she was much stronger then this, she was a professional wrestler as well, many times playing the villain, which I thought would have prepared her better for bullying or negative feedback. I'm sad to see such a young, physically strong, beautiful woman take her own life. Emotionally she was not strong.

I've seen foreign shows in USA, also reality TV show. 10x worse behavior. Sleeping with one another day one. Fights 10x worse with people ending up in hospital.

No one in foreign reality TV shows commit suicide afterwards. They also receive negative comments. They also get judged.

In Japan especially New Young Generation is very Fragile. Not good, it has consequences. Birth rates dropping and suicides rates going up is a good Indicator of that.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Wish she could have been stronger mentally but when you care a lot about the opinion of others and how you’re perceived, that may have been too much

In Japan especially New Young Generation is very Fragile.

That may be; because the older generation is very thin-skinned to begin with.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

One guy tells the victim when she was alive that she should kill herself. Ultimately she kills herself and this guy gets a slap on the wrist of 9,000 yen. A different guy, after she's already dead, says he's happy she's gone and he gets 1.29 million yen fine. Makes perfect sense ONLY in Japan..

The person who drove her yo suicide should receive more punishment.

I’ve found spelling it out is the more effective way to communicate in Japan unless you enjoy explaining to your colleagues “perfect sense.” What is the meaning of perfect sense? Whips out the electronic dictionary to look up perfect and then sense.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

This was a civil lawsuit, similar to the two others. If you get a fine of yen 9000,- while she was still alive, the best is you pay it, walk out of the courtroom and the matter is finished.

That's OK I think for verbally insulting a person. Usually such matters are regulated out of court, many people in Japan pay some few 10.000 yen bills as compensation money after a small accident causing minor injuries etc. - sometimes assisted by police, which is legal in Japan.

However I am sceptical about 1.29 million yen for insulting a person who was already dead at that time, I think he should continue his case - this should not be a final decision.

I am not a lawyer, but maybe he should try to lower the fine considerably, insult a person alive is yen 9000,- and insult a person already dead is 1.29 million yen - this is clearly out of proportion, does not make sense.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

quercetumToday 02:21 pm JST

The person who drove her to suicide should receive more punishment.

Might be, but not so much more. In Japan most of such minor accidents, damages, quarrels, insults etc. among ordinary people are settled out of court and the go-rate is a few yen 10.000 bills only. Every police-box has forms for such agreements.

Celebrities are always and everywhere facing internet-based insults and praise, are belittled and admired. As a celebrity, regardless if female or male, regardless if actress, singer, baseball-star or politician etc., you have to live with that all the time.

About facing online insults as a celebrity, I can only advice such people to use the delete-button and forget about it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The ruling wraps more cotton wool around the unresilient mind. It does not help someone build mental resilience to survive in this world.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Lets be brutally honest, nobody kills themselves because a complete stranger tells them to. Unless they have other underlying mental illness. If you disagree with me go lie in the road...

See you didn't did you?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The standard response when someone tells you to "die!" always was, and always will be, "sorry, I don't do requests".

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Mr KiplingToday 04:47 pm JST

Lets be brutally honest, nobody kills themselves because a complete stranger tells them to. Unless they have other underlying mental illness. If you disagree with me go lie in the road...

See you didn't did you?

Yes, let's be brutally honest.

This woman killed herself because of bullying.

It doesn't matter what your personal opinion is of that; what is at issue is how she felt. HER feelings; not yours; and not how others might have felt under the same circumstances - HER feelings.

Anyone who expresses anything other than sympathy for someone who dies by suicide is completley bereft of any human empathy. Go lie in the road, indeed.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

This woman killed herself because of bullying. 

A strangers hateful comments are very unpleasant and stress inducing but in and of themselves not the reason behind Kimura’s suicide. Similarly situated people are also routinely subjected to the same harsh treatment by members of the public. She made herself into a public figure by participating in a television program despite her fragile mental state. There are many different choices people can make when confronted by problems in life - suicide being one of the most extreme.

I do not agree with the legal judgment in this circumstance but that is a matter for the Japanese legal system and for their society. I just think it blames a very troubled persons entire mental state on this persons mean spirited comments when there is much more to it than that.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

No one in foreign reality TV shows commit suicide afterwards.

The host of a very popular reality series in the UK did, Caroline Flack. In her case, it was mostly the media talking about her, not trolls on Twitter. As with most suicides, we can only speculate on how important her different motives were.

It is clear though that people who appear on reality tv can have huge problems adjusting to life after it, with anxiety and depression fairly common.

With this defamation case, I wonder if the defence could make a case that his/her client was attacking the fictional "Hana Kimura" who improvised around a script on Terrace House or hammed it up as a wrestler, not the real person with the same name.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Wolfpack Today 06:18 pm JST

A strangers hateful comments are very unpleasant and stress inducing but in and of themselves not the reason behind Kimura’s suicide.

She wrote, "Every day, I receive nearly 100 honest opinions and I cannot deny that I get hurt."

Are you trying to say that people who write suicide notes lie about the reason they are committing suicide?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

She made herself into a public figure by participating in a television program despite her fragile mental state.

Oh, of course it's her fault that people are hateful monsters who prey on those who are weak.

Obviously.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

MaikuCToday 04:22 pm JST

The ruling wraps more cotton wool around the unresilient mind. It does not help someone build mental resilience to survive in this world.

I agree - this has nothing to do with how hateful and mean people are, and everything to do with her not being strong enough. It's HER fault for not having the right mental fortitude!

I know - let's all go around saying horrible mean things to each other so that we can prepare one another for the harsh cruel world.

Oh, wait ...

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

There is a HUGE problem in Japan with young people and cyber bullying, school absenteeism, and suicide. I am guessing the judge wanted to make a very public statement to all those spiteful meanies lurking out there.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

too many people find very easy to insult and attack others in internet, maybe this will make them think twice before doing it.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I can't help but wonder if this won't eventually be weaponized to silence criticism of government policy.

It will be eventually. You should see Scotland's hate speech laws, it's just blasphemy but with groups of people instead of religion

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Guy is definitely a jerk, however 1.29 million fine for that?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

girl_in_tokyo

I know - let's all go around saying horrible mean things to each other so that we can prepare one another for the harsh cruel world. Oh, wait ..

I am not happy if you say horrible mean things to me, but I would absolutely defend your right to do so. Freedom of speech is more important than hurt feelings.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Sandoval

**Guy is definitely a jerk, however 1.29 million fine for that?** I am disappointed that jerk should have had to pay more.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

He tweeted after death,so this ruling makes no sense and has no links with any crime, I hope the man is doing well, and keeps up the strong attitude.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

ZaphodMay 20  10:04

I am not happy if you say horrible mean things to me, but I would absolutely defend your right to do so. Freedom of speech is more important than hurt feelings.

Freedom of speech has nothing to do with a person’s right to say anything they want. It’s a right enshrined in law that prevents the government from prosecuting people for anti-government political action.

But people keep twisting the meaning of freedom of speech to mean that they are entitled to say anything they want without consequences.

But all speech has consequences. When will you come to understand that?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Kei KuronoToday  12:37 am JST

He tweeted after death,so this ruling makes no sense and has no links with any crime, I hope the man is doing well, and keeps up the strong attitude.

Strong attitude?

I think you mean cruel and inhuman.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

To wake up & ‘agree‘ with @ReasonandWisdomNippon 1:30pm is surprising.

- “Sad... In Japan, especially the new, young generation is very Fragile. Not good, it has consequences. Birth rates dropping and suicides rates going up is a good Indicator of that.” -

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They refuse ‘understand’ @wtfjapan? 6:55am

“In Japan its a common insult/swear word to tell someone to die. This needs to stop.” -

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How lightly they see other lives @finally rich 7:54am

“I see this pattern. Kids from a young age are used to joke with pals with words "shine!" "shindara?" "shineba ii noni" , all very lightly. This might be just another cultural trait I am still unable to decipher, a hint on how lightly they see ‘their ‘own’ lives.” -

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Surprising words, @oldman_13 7:57am, coming from you.

“Freedom of speech. If you're a celebrity, then you should realize that there are idiots out there who will say hateful things online. Either deal with it or don't put yourself out there on social media.” -

But, yesterday, *you generally claimed JT commenters were “hating”** *on a ‘Good Samaritan’, when they were only questioning the circumstances and intent:

“No good deed ever goes unpunished here among the JT regulars. Good for him, I don't see any of the ‘haters’ help.” -

Yet, today, you have no sympathy, nor empathy for the victim of cyber-bullying and her surviving family?

“There's multiple videos of celebrities reading all the hateful and hurtful things people post about them on social media, but I don't see all of them killing themselves over it.”

Are you referring Jimmy Kimmel’s guests reading “Mean Tweets”, YouTube; “Cash for Clicks”, etc?

They’re being disingenuous. Those ‘celebrities’ are using the opportunity to ‘monetize the hate’.

“Unless it's a specific and credible death threat, why are people being penalized and fined for internet postings?” -

0 ( +0 / -0 )

But all speech has consequences. When will you come to understand that?

It doesn't have to be the government that metes it out though

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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