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Musashino city in Tokyo rejects proposal for foreigners to vote in referendums

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Kei KuronoToday  05:15 am JST

Why would foreigners vote in Japan they can already vote in there home country ...

I can't vote in my home country.

...also Japanese people abroad are unable to vote in there host country too.

In some countries they are allowed to vote in certain elections.

Only citizens can vote in all countries of the world. Does foreign people in the comments lack common sense and education?

Don't know about foreign people in the comments but you don't appear all that well-educated on this issue yourself.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Why would foreigners vote in Japan they can already vote in there home country also Japanese people abroad are unable to vote in there host country too. Only citizens can vote in all countries of the world. Does foreign people in the comments lack common sense and education?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

NosuiDec. 24  01:25 pm JST

Good - only citizens should have the right to vote.

Why, just because they happen to have been born in a particular place? Should they be automatically entitled to driving licenses as well?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It would be interesting to carry out an opinion poll among foreigners in Japan to find out how many foreigners are really permanent resident holders and claiming voting rights and how many are interested to renounce their present nationality and prefer to switch over to Japanese citizenship.

For me, holding EU citizenship, other issues are clearly more imporant while living in Japan: to be the owner of my condominium unit, enjoy full health insurance cover, no working permit required etc. I am now 65+ and like to be a 'Japanese' senior with reduced fare using the JR railway, half price on public bus network in my area, free entrance to swimming pools and museums....

Voting rights? About myself, I really don't care, no issue for me at all. Of course I have to pay taxes like every Japanese citizen.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Good - only citizens should have the right to vote. If you want to vote, become a Japanese citizen.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Christopher LoweryToday  08:09 am JST

If you pay taxes and your income is entirely earned in Japan, the reasons for being banned from voting seem a bit shallow.

The basic argument appears to be that it is in some way dangerous. I've never seen this adequately explained.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

StrangerlandToday  01:13 am JST

If foreigners want to vote in Japan, there is a pathway to it; taking citizenship. If you aren't willing to take on citizenship, it shows that you don't have the requisite loyalty to Japan to be making decisions in the country's best interests, and therefore shouldn't be given the right to vote.

Fair point, if there have ever actually been many, or indeed any, cases of foreign nationals with voting rights in a country not making decisions in its best interests. I think that rules such as this should be based on precedent, not lofty-sounding but really rather vague and meaningless sentiments about "loyalty" to a country. That's not what voting is about for most of the actual citizens anyway. They're voting for whoever they think will act in their particular interests, not the country's. That's how Japan has been stuck with the LDP in charge for decades.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

To the people who are angry about this, would you still be happy about non-citizens voting in your own home country?

There are countries where foreign individuals can vote in there residential county the U.S. being one of them.

If you pay taxes and your income is entirely earned in Japan, the reasons for being banned from voting seem a bit shallow.

“, but there’s currently more than 23 million people (over half of the total immigrants in the country) who are naturalized and can vote and be elected for offices as high as State Governor. “

23 million naturalized? That's an amazing number, I'd like to see the stats on that.

If true, that would represent a significant percentage of the present 125.8 million population. And if proper leadership were in place that said percentage could have significant influence already. A more interesting question would be why they do not?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

I've never agreed with giving non-citizens the right to vote in federal or even prefectural elections. I can understand letting them vote in municipal elections though.

If foreigners want to vote in Japan, there is a pathway to it; taking citizenship. If you aren't willing to take on citizenship, it shows that you don't have the requisite loyalty to Japan to be making decisions in the country's best interests, and therefore shouldn't be given the right to vote.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

"Some countries allow foreigners to vote in certain elections."

That's correct.

However, the issue here is Japanese nationals, not the fact Irish can vote in the UK, or a German in France and vice versa.

Japanese cannot vote in the EU.

In the UK only Scotland allows it, providing they're residents.

Not in England, not in Wales, not in N Ireland.

Why should Japan allow the Chinese to vote?!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Peeping_TomToday  10:35 pm JST

So, Gaijin WANTS to vote in Japan, while the Japanese CANNOT vote in Gaijin's beautiful and more advanced countries.

So? If Japanese nationals live abroad and pay taxes in the countries where they live they should be allowed to vote as well. Other than emotive guff about proving loyalty to the country by naturalising or whatever, I've yet to read one compelling argument against letting foreigners vote, in Japan or anywhere else.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

So, Gaijin WANTS to vote in Japan, while the Japanese CANNOT vote in Gaijin's beautiful and more advanced countries.

Gaijin is annoyed because Japan said NO.

The audacity of some people!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

To be fair, citizenship privileges are not human rights. If you want absolute equality, communist China and N Korea are certainly your better choices.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Tom SanToday  08:51 am JST

Foreign residents should not have the right to vote.

Hm. Any kind of limit or restriction usually serves some useful purpose, e.g. it reduces accidents if only people with licences are allowed to drive. What kind of problem does not letting foreigners vote prevent?

knight_of_HonourToday  09:10 am JST

Allowing non citizens to vote in any manner is ridiculous and probably unlawful in any country.

Nothing can be "unlawful" in a particular country if it's also "allowed."

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I have lived in Japan for a long time and never felt the slightest need to vote. Most people can’t be bothered voting anyway.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Good for the city! You want the right to vote in this country, then become naturalized, like the thousands of us who have done it.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

As a foreigner married to Japanese myself. I don't see how this is even a thing for debate.

paying tax doesn't mean you should have the right to vote.

You are paying tax because you live here, you use the public properties, the roads, libraries etc.,

2 ( +4 / -2 )

For a democracy to exist, voting must be restricted to property owning citizens.

When all people have the right to vote, mob rule by the loudest ensues, leading to the collapse of democracy.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

hattorikunToday  01:38 pm JST

Sometimes we voted the wrong people in power.

Only sometimes?

That happens everywhere.

With the same predictable regularity?

Letting foreigners vote is like selling your country to… China (just an example).

No, it's not. Not unless any of the candidates, who would and should be Japanese nationals, planned on selling the country to China.

Shocked?

Not really. This argument against allowing foreign nationals to vote is about as widespread as it is flimsy.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

“Japanese are told who to vote for, they don’t vote. Letting foreigners vote might mean change. That would Be a shock !”

Wrong. We Japanese do vote. Not all though but that’s none of my business coz if you have the right and not exercise it then don’t complain. Sometimes we voted the wrong people in power. That happens everywhere. Letting foreigners vote is like selling your country to… China (just an example). Shocked?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Foreign residents in many countries are not allowed to vote in local elections, that's pretty normal. I know lots of Japanese expats who are residents of a foreign country who are not allowed to vote in State or Federal elections. That right is only granted with Citizenship.

Don't see anything particularly strange about this decision at all.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Being oneself is better than being ignored.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Mark

How sad to see people posting such a comment, the U.S. is NOT a failed state, never was never will be, a failed state can't be #1 economy

That's China right now, not the US.

US's economy is fiction. Paper pushing.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Allowing non citizens to vote in any manner is ridiculous and probably unlawful in any country. What possible reason can they use? It sounds like what the Democrats are trying to do in the United States to gain more power and keep it. I doubt one person in ten foreign residents in Asia would be interested. Spanish speaking residents in the USA would mostly be more interested in voting Republican unless their relatives could join them.

states to gain more power

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

""Never, ever allow dual citizenship, that's the road to a failed state like the US!""

How sad to see people posting such a comment, the U.S. is NOT a failed state, never was never will be, a failed state can't be #1 economy, Can't have the largest reserve of any thing, or were people are free to choose any life style they wish to live.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

No problem, it would be a good idea for foreigners to start moving and investing in the cities that are friendlier and gives voting rights to it's foreign residents.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Foreign residents should not have the right to vote.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I think the biggest issue was the 3month period. Is too short. Who knows what these so called voters could do if they don't even plan to stay for long and just decide to vote to mess with certain policies.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

glad to see the oyajis photographing the auspicious moment for posterity.... (⌒▽⌒)

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

I fail to see how a foreign residents vote in a referendum in Musashino City is a threat to Japan's national security.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Good for them. Foreigners should not be voting in Japanese elections. That should be reserved for citizens. I pay plenty of taxes in Japan. I feel I do have a voice just by calling the city office or talking to local representatives. They have listened and provided clear answers or actions on several occasions. I know in the US I didn't want foreigners voting in our elections either.

Japanese are told who to vote for, they don’t vote. Letting foreigners vote might mean change. That would Be a shock !

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

@Richard Gallagher

As always, the voice of reason.

We might disagree but I tip my hat to you, sir.

-11 ( +7 / -18 )

Good to see many people speaking sense, if you want to vote, renounce your former country's citizenship and naturalize.

That's fair for both sides.

Never, ever allow dual citizenship, that's the road to a failed state like the US!

-10 ( +12 / -22 )

It’s high time foreigners got with the programs and donate excessive amounts of money to the LDP then they could pass a law allowing a 1/3 vote weight to foreign PR.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

Good for them. Foreigners should not be voting in Japanese elections. That should be reserved for citizens. I pay plenty of taxes in Japan. I feel I do have a voice just by calling the city office or talking to local representatives. They have listened and provided clear answers or actions on several occasions. I know in the US I didn't want foreigners voting in our elections either.

2 ( +13 / -11 )

Japan should something something ... Human rights ... something something.... beacon to the world.... something something....

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

amid concern voiced by some conservatives that it could give foreigners a say in national security matters

Haha, this is pure gold. Local election, national security? Please explain, I have gotta hear this one.

2 ( +11 / -9 )

I'm a citizen of THREE countries, two by Jurist Sanguinus and one by Juris Soli. By law, I can not vote in two of them, and in the can not vote due to "red tape". I'm a PR of Japan but WILL not become a citizen due to the requirements of relinquishing ALL other nationalities. I CHOOSE to keep three passports. I ACCEPT the fact that I can not and SHOULD NOT be able to vote as a non-citizen. One day, I MAY reside in ONE of my citizenship states and then MAY vote. Maybe!

2 ( +10 / -8 )

So. It is an absurdist claim to assert a right to vote, solely based on paying taxes. Essentially, you are asking for rights of citizenship, simply by paying taxes. What a queer sense of entitlement to deem one is owed the right to vote, as a foreigner, in a foreign country, by paying taxes.

The path to becoming a Japanese citizen is clearly determined. However, you cannot possess dual citizenship nor can a native born Japanese.

Non-citizens cannot vote in any elections in the USA, even if they have a Green Card and pay taxes.

2 ( +13 / -11 )

To the people who are angry about this, would you still be happy about non-citizens voting in your own home country?

In national elections? No. But in local elections where it’s just local stuff that only affects local residents at stake like this I have absolutely no problem with it.

0 ( +9 / -9 )

If you want the RIGHT to vote, you should become a CITIZEN! Simple! Non-citizens should NEVER have the right to vote.

1 ( +12 / -11 )

“@JRO - well said! An open minded and multi cultural society would never vote for the crooked LDP and they know this!“

this is off topic in my opinion, mods!

-9 ( +5 / -14 )

“If it were only so simple. For one, even if one naturalizes, one will never be accepted as a true Japanese, and secondly, renouncing one’s country of birth comes with consequences of its own.”

On your first point, it’s not relevant here. You vote no mater what being a citizen. Many foreigners gain acceptance and respect here. Discrimination exists everywhere! On the second point, JP laws don’t allow dual citizenship so make a choice. If not, this is not for you.

-5 ( +8 / -13 )

The only reason all these rules and hurdles exists is because of nationalism and xenophobia and nothing else. Most of the people in power today would rather see Japan burn to the ground then to see it become a more diverse society.

@JRO - well said! An open minded and multi cultural society would never vote for the crooked LDP and they know this!

0 ( +8 / -8 )

vaxatharian

"To the people who are angry about this, would you still be happy about non-citizens voting in your own home country?"

Guess what: that is perfectly fine in my home country. Voting for municipalities only requires you are a registered resident of that municipality.

For provincial an national elections one needs to be a citizen.

0 ( +9 / -9 )

“Loyalty to what?

The Hinomaru?

Do you really think that carrying a country’s passport inspires loyalty?“

not everyone. There is always a traitor or three everywhere. We can’t prevent that. But citizenship, with or without a passport, allow you to vote. It’s a matter of principle and law. Don’t question it.

-6 ( +7 / -13 )

damn. maybe someday.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

“, but there’s currently more than 23 million people (over half of the total immigrants in the country) who are naturalized and can vote and be elected for offices as high as State Governor. “

They are naturalized citizens. So they are citizens. They have the right to vote. That’s obvious. If you want to vote here, naturalize to be a Japanese citizen!

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

"If you want the same rights, then become a Japanese citizen" 

If it were only so simple. For one, even if one naturalizes, one will never be accepted as a true Japanese, and secondly, renouncing one’s country of birth comes with consequences of its own.

3 ( +13 / -10 )

So many prejudiced Japanese posters on here. I feel shame.

Foreign residents should definitely be allowed to vote for me. My whole family thinks so too.

-1 ( +14 / -15 )

There is so many people that just throw out the "If you want the same rights, then become a Japanese citizen" most of us would already have Japanese citizenship if they allowed dual citizenship like most other countries, while Japan turns a blind eye on Japanese citizens getting dual citizenship elsewhere. In many countries it takes like 5 years to get citizenship without having to give up anything. If you pay the same taxes and spend reasonable long enough time in that country you should have the same rights, there is no logical reason for that not to be a thing.

The only reason all these rules and hurdles exists is because of nationalism and xenophobia and nothing else. Most of the people in power today would rather see Japan burn to the ground then to see it become a more diverse society.

7 ( +18 / -11 )

I have mixed feeling about this. Citizenship should carry privileges, but I would have no problem with permanent residents voting in local elections.

Do they think the Zainichi are problem?

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

*paid

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Doesn't matter how long you've lived there, doesn't matter how may taxes you've paved. You're always a foreigner. No reason to live there

4 ( +9 / -5 )

“If you pay tax to the city, you should have a say in how it’s run. Every taxpayer should have the right to vote”

No. you work here and earn your living here you must pay taxes but that doesn’t mean you have all the rights of a citizen. Otherwise what’s the point of being a citizen? If I pay tax in the US does it give me the right to vote in a referendum or local election?

2 ( +14 / -12 )

Although the vast majority of cities in the US do not allow voting, there are 11 municipalities in the US that do allow non citizen residents to vote. And add New York to the list as of Dec 9th.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

Ahaha @tokyoliving I am afraid you chose the wrong example, immigrants in the USA can not vote without taking the American nationality, true, but there’s currently more than 23 million people (over half of the total immigrants in the country) who are naturalized and can vote and be elected for offices as high as State Governor. Japanese citizens can make the choice of not extending any of their own rights, which they earned by doing absolutely nothing else than being born here, to the foreigners who leave in the country; they can choose to take away those rights from Japanese who refuse to give up their ‘other’ culture, and continue being racist with those who renounce to the other nationality to be a Japanese citizen but look different. But the fact they can make these choices doesn’t make them nice choices, and I am happy to know there are people in Musashino, Zushi, Toyonaka and elsewhere in Japan that are trying to build a more open minded, diverse and inclusive society.

-6 ( +7 / -13 )

@shogun36

If you don't pay taxes, you shouldn't even be in a country, let alone vote.

The absolute state of mind for westerners.

-3 ( +12 / -15 )

Voting rights should be reserved for citizens in order to avoid conflicts of interest.

Non citizens in my country and just about every single other country cannot vote nor run for office.

But non citizen's voices and concerns should be taken into account.

7 ( +14 / -7 )

Before you are a city-resident, you must be a Japanese to have a say to whatever or however trivial matters, especially when you can hop around with your multiple passports. Paying Tax? so what? Unless you pay tax, you should not use any such kind of public infrastructures.

2 ( +11 / -9 )

Tax is an obligation. Vote is a right. You can’t buy the right to vote

0 ( +17 / -17 )

Surprise surprise Japan.

Keep it ignorant.

How are all that tax money that foreigners pay every month?

Keeping things rolling in the economy?

Filing up corrupt politicians pockets?

-4 ( +13 / -17 )

Great news, well done Japan!!..

Do another country let expats to vote??..

Imagine US immigrants voting..

If you want to vote in another country than yours, try first to learn the costumes, the culture, the language and get citizenship..

You have to earn the right to vote, It's not only paying taxes, its a matter of get naturalized first..

Its country..

Its laws..

Its culture..

Its costumes..

Unless you be Japanese citizen, vote in your own country..

Plain and simple..

-5 ( +19 / -24 )

“i have been paying here taxes over many decades much higher than the average Japanese.

japan didn’t even have to pay for my education through 20 plus years.“

You will be a hell of a citizen. Impressive. But the right to vote is what makes a citizen different from otherwise so until then I would advise you to work toward citizenship. If not one would question your commitment to this country. Maybe just me.

1 ( +14 / -13 )

@Iron Lad

Loyalty to what?

The Hinomaru?

Do you really think that carrying a country’s passport inspires loyalty?

6 ( +17 / -11 )

Japan is doing the right thing. Foreigners are going to vote for their own interests, not for the interests of Japan or Japanese citizens. Next thing you know, Japan won’t be Japan anymore. Japan, keep your culture and society the way it is. I’m happy to to be a gaijin here and do not need to interject my western perceptions and ways of doing things into Japanese politics. Taxes do not entitle you to vote. You must pay for the privilege to work and live in another country. Pay your taxes, keep your head down.

-6 ( +19 / -25 )

For those who are complaining maybe you should read the book 'Silent Invasion' by Clive Hamilton.

-4 ( +9 / -13 )

Until 2016, the population of a local area (市町村) did not even count non-Japanese. If you were here before then, you have wonder if any of the taxes you paid nationally, like the consumption tax, ever made it back to your town.

The "it's a first step to them voting in national elections" is classic scaremongering. That decision, which is a million miles away and will probably never happen, would have absolutely nothing to do with Musashino City.

7 ( +15 / -8 )

Was I surprised?

i have been paying here taxes over many decades much higher than the average Japanese.

japan didn’t even have to pay for my education through 20 plus years.

I just have the same obligations as any other Japanese but zero rights.

Xenophobia is the name of the game but then why do business with overseas why make Olympics if only Japanese are clever enough to vote for better services?

7 ( +21 / -14 )

@kurisupisu

Japan should never do that.

One loyalty, never divided.

-19 ( +9 / -28 )

Just 3 months, you can have a say? which part of which countries making it happen?

0 ( +8 / -8 )

tokyobakayaroToday  06:23 pm JST

Well said!

-2 ( +11 / -13 )

I would happily become Japanese,

if Japan allowed dual nationality.

15 ( +26 / -11 )

Honestly I am already happy that the question was asked, it’s a start and the demonstration that inclusive and participatory practices are possible in Japan too - just not yet, but there are many people thinking about a different society. To me what is still puzzling is that my Japanese son will be able to vote in a few years, then will lose that right if ever he wants to keep his other ´half’ nationality at 20. So from a country that takes away rights from its own citizens, I consider this discussion a great advance in and of itself.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

@tokyobakayaro

Well said!

0 ( +16 / -16 )

I’ve bene here for over 20 years, paid a hell of a lot of taxes and social security and never took a dime. I like Japan and the Japanese but my experience is this is no country for foreigners. You’re accepted here as long as you stay basically transparent and shut up. So be it, I stay on making money but this is the way this country is run by the elite of old angry little men and it will never ever change

10 ( +20 / -10 )

Always the same comments linking taxes and having a voice. When you drive on the highway, you pay toll but it doesn't make you shareholder of the motorway operator...

Racism? Ridiculous. My Japanese wife is married to a foreigner (me) and yet she's opposed to me voting in Japan. Why? She couldn't vote in any French elections. I don't blame her. Same apply to those married to US, UK, Canadian, OZ citizens...

Most of foreigners in Japan are Asians. With the exception of South Korea none of other Asian countries allow foreigners to vote. Do Japanese people want to see Chinese, Thai or Vietnamese vote in Japan while Japanese have no such right in those countries. Brazilians? Only citizens from Portugal are allowed to vote in Brazil, why the hell would Brazilians be allowed to vote here? China? elections don't even exist...

As a tax payer in Japan I must admit I would be a terrible hypocrite to advocate permanent residents to vote here while perfectly knowing such thing is absolutely not allowed back in France.

If Japan would allow permanent residents to vote based on reciprocity most you here would still cry foul because it would probably exclude most of you, right?

5 ( +23 / -18 )

Did anyone honestly think this would have passed?!! This is a country that doesn’t even accept dual citizenship so good luck in voting rights for foreign residents

6 ( +14 / -8 )

If you want to vote or have your say heard in matters of our national interest, get a Japanese passport and ledge allegiance to us. period. Thank you for such contribution otherwise it’s a risk to deal with in the long run. When it’s a group 10 maybe not much but a million will probably change a whole agenda, which might not serve us all as citizens of this country .

-2 ( +16 / -18 )

This affects me directly and I was getting excited about being able to vote and have a say in the place I have lived for most of my adult life. BUT if it is not wanted, so be it. I take the decision as a gauge of the national oyagi mood. Opposition to such voting rights granted to us outsiders could be used as political leverage for all sorts of nasty anti-foreign t@rds. Unfortunately, it seems nationalism is the new thing, something my generation was educated to be wary of. To boot, I also know a lot of gaijin who I would not trust to do the honourable thing because they have that gaijin chip on their shoulder. Downvote me if you agree!!!

5 ( +13 / -8 )

RecklessToday  05:36 pm JST

If you really want to vote, I think your should make the commitment to become a citizen. I mean, nobody's forcing you to stay in Japan and make a living here. 

Such a wonderful comment. Tens if not hundreds of thousands of Japanese have foreign passports and may vote in foreign elections. On the other hand, the Japanese government prohibits foreigners from getting a second Japanese passport. Take and then give, maybe, is the Japanese way.

If it's that important to you, why not move to a country that lets non-citizens vote in local elections? Assuming you're living in Japan now, nobody is forcing you to stay. Why should the Japanese change the rules just to keep you happy? I've got PR and I'm not upset about it, because I knew about the rule up front and still came here.

-3 ( +20 / -23 )

MocheakeToday  05:40 pm JST

vaxatharianToday 05:10 pm JST

To the people who are angry about this, would you still be happy about non-citizens voting in your own home country?

You do realize this is not about voting in the national elections, don't you?

Of course. I'm open to changing the rules for people with PR in local elections, like Cricky said, but probably not at the prefectural level and certainly not at the national level.

0 ( +12 / -12 )

Yes

-5 ( +8 / -13 )

Foreign residents should be allowed to vote in local referendums under the same criteria as those applied to Japanese nationals.

10 ( +27 / -17 )

National erection, we are way way away from that, but locally it would be empowering to have a small nod to PR. And how many suits do you need to represent an area? Most voters have problems knowing what day it is.

way way too many suits for no purpose other than their own.

4 ( +12 / -8 )

To those that wonder how the right to vote might influence candidates in local elections should familiarize themselves with the current mayor of London.

1 ( +13 / -12 )

I'm not happy with the wording of this headline. A better word would be "legal immigrants" and not "foreigners". Regardless of the Japanese word gaikokujin, in English, "foreigners" implies and can include people who don't reside in a country and have never even visited. This referendum was not about such people; it was about legal tax-paying immigrants, and the headline should have indicated such.

23 ( +34 / -11 )

vaxatharianToday 05:10 pm JST

To the people who are angry about this, would you still be happy about non-citizens voting in your own home country?

You do realize this is not about voting in the national elections, don't you?

10 ( +25 / -15 )

What is all this fuss about? What influence would you have if you were allowed to vote? Almost nothing, at maximum you can give your opinion if a bridge is painted orange or red or if there’s the 184th seniors’ Hula dance club opened at the community center or only 183 and one HipHop dance Club for the few remaining children. Come on, no one , neither foreigners nor Japanese, really need such senseless elections and not even their outcomes.

-6 ( +18 / -24 )

If you really want to vote, I think your should make the commitment to become a citizen. I mean, nobody's forcing you to stay in Japan and make a living here. 

Such a wonderful comment. Tens if not hundreds of thousands of Japanese have foreign passports and may vote in foreign elections. On the other hand, the Japanese government prohibits foreigners from getting a second Japanese passport. Take and then give, maybe, is the Japanese way.

12 ( +28 / -16 )

Does that mean a non Japanese no longer has to contribute to their pay, and incidentals?

6 ( +21 / -15 )

If you really want to vote, I think your should make the commitment to become a citizen. I mean, nobody's forcing you to stay in Japan and make a living here. And there are probably plenty of people who still vote in their home country without having lived there for years - so get representation without taxation. I did, before my voting rights expired.

What's more, how many of us speak Japanese well enough to understand local issues to a level where you can make an informed choice? I'm not throwing darts here, just genuinely curious.

-10 ( +27 / -37 )

I guess it could have been expected.

Score another point for the anti-foreigners. (Anti-foreigners are doing well these days since COVID hit.)

Considering that "results of local referendums are not legally binding", isn't the "referendum" more like an opinion poll. Hard to think how foreigners living here can damage Japan's sovereignty by registering their stance on issues.

14 ( +29 / -15 )

The vote was 100 nays, 0 yeas.

8 ( +18 / -10 )

Of course they did. They didn’t get their job by being open minded or actually caring about people.

11 ( +25 / -14 )

@vaxatharian

To the people who are angry about this, would you still be happy about non-citizens voting in your own home country?

Sure. If they have to pay taxes like every other person, then they deserve to have a voice in who spends that revenue and how it is spent. What is unfair about that?

23 ( +41 / -18 )

If residents can't have a say in how their taxes are spent, then they shouldn't have to pay any tax.

No taxation without representation, and all that.

29 ( +48 / -19 )

Yes, yes, and yes.

But unfortunately this isn't actually a democracy, if you haven't noticed by now.

11 ( +30 / -19 )

If you pay tax to the city, you should have a say in how it’s run. Every taxpayer should have the right to vote

32 ( +56 / -24 )

To the people who are angry about this, would you still be happy about non-citizens voting in your own home country?

-22 ( +35 / -57 )

The voting down of the ordinance came after the city assembly's general affairs committee approved last week the controversial plan proposed in November by Musashino Mayor Reiko Matsushita, who has called for creating a city that accepts diversity.

Musashino Mayor ok with voting right but not city assembly. They don't want voting right from foreigners but they want contribution from foreigners to their city from tax, insurance, pension etc. They just little bit picky people.

20 ( +38 / -18 )

Portent of what is in store...?

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

It also drew flak online, with critics saying it could be a step toward granting foreigners the right to vote

Heaven forfend such an outrage.

We're here to pay all manner of taxes and into the Ponzi pension and Insurance schemes, and to tell people whether or not we can use chopsticks when asked.

How dare some of us have the audacity to hope for any kind of representation in the country we chose to live and work?

33 ( +56 / -23 )

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