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Prince Hisahito, parents leave for Bhutan

9 Comments

Crown Prince Fumihito, Crown Princess Kiko and their son Prince Hisahito left on Friday for a 10-day private family trip to Bhutan.

The family will arrive in Bhutan on Saturday via Thailand and meet Bhutanese King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck over lunch on Monday in the capital Thimphu.

It will be the first overseas trip for the 12-year-old Prince Hisahito, who is currently on summer holiday from his junior high school.

The family will watch a demonstration of archery, Bhutan's national sport, on Tuesday. Visits to temples and museums are also scheduled during their stay before they return on Aug 25.

Crown Prince Fumihito, first in line to the Chrysanthemum Throne following his brother Emperor Naruhito's enthronement in May, and Prince Hisahito, second in line, took separate flights as a precautionary measure.

The family has maintained a close relationship with the South Asian kingdom since the two countries established diplomatic ties in 1986. The couple traveled to the country in 1997 and attended a welcome ceremony for the king of Bhutan in 2011 when he visited Japan as a state guest.

In 2017, Princess Mako, elder sister of Prince Hisahito, paid an official visit to Bhutan.

© KYODO

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9 Comments
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If this is a family trip is this at their expense and not the taxpayers or is this the reason why 10-day private family trip to Bhutan, the family will arrive in Bhutan on Saturday via Thailand and meet Bhutanese King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck over lunch on Monday in the capital Thimphu making part official therefore costs paid by he taxpayers. hmm. Can a reporter from JT elaborate the readers further?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

 is this at their expense and not the taxpayers

The question is meaningless, since every yen they have comes out of our taxes anyway. However they pay for their holiday, we end up footing the bill.

Lunch with the king, a demonstration of archery, visits to temples and museums

Sounds like a fantastic summer holiday for a 12-year-old.

Not.

He should be snorkelling in Okinawa, surfing in Hawaii, camping and hiking on adventure trails virtually anywhere.

A kid who has no childhood. Sad.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

We can't chose our parents if I could would I replace my memories with ….....

Lunch with the king, a demonstration of archery, visits to temples and museums.....

Possibly but I would want to be back by teatime.....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I believe this is a private family trip which could be paid in two ways. From the yearly money given to the imperial family, which comes from the taxpayers.

http://www.kunaicho.go.jp/e-about/seido/seido08.html

The other way is from the private wealth of the imperial family, estimated to be about ¥5 billion.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We don't mind. Is our duty as citizens to show respect for the imperial family. This is Japan.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

 Can a reporter from JT elaborate the readers further?

Only you seem to need to know.Royal Family members travel on taxpayers monies,regardless of public or private trips.

We don't mind. 

Really? They're just normal people with no special powers, beyond being born into their privileged situation.

10 days there must be really boring.Poor kid.What a blast talking about his summer holiday trip to his boys at school.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

 Is our duty as citizens to show respect for the imperial family.

No it is not. If you wish to, but there are no laws requiring you to and not all Japanese people respect the imperial family, like the communist party for instance.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Absolutely wonderful! I wish the Crown Prince, Crown Princess and young Prince Hisahito a fabulous tour of Bhutan. It sure is on my Bucket List, too! Both nations have ancient Royal families and have great admiration for one another.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Because of the Emperor, Japan exists today. So is our country Bhutan due to our own dynamic Kings. Therefore, the familiy of the Emperor deserves highest respect. Welcome to Bhutan and happy stay your highness.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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