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Relatives commemorate victims on 34th anniversary of 1985 JAL jet crash

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A terrible accident - the families carry their grief and loss with them all their lives.

Meanwhile, to deal with drunkenness among flight crew, the best JAL president can suggest is to "...strengthen our efforts to change our crew members' mindset."?

It's not a character-building exercise. There ought to be a law for pilots - instant dismissal when found drunk on a flight. There is no excuse, not even the one people always throw up that "Well, the planes fly themselves, really". Say that when a loved one dies because someone couldn't keep off the booze before going to work.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Yes, indeed... You are 1000% correct... There's no other way to explain it but, "Welcome to Japan..."

Although, that particular incident had nothing to do with alcohol, there are some facts conveniently left out.

The U.S. military had helicopters in the air, right after the crash, and were ready to start rescue operations, but were told, "No Thank you," by Japanese authorities...

Which by the way, didn't start rescue operations until the next morning, so we're talking about at least 8 or 10 hours had elapsed after the crash... No telling if anyone else may have been saved or not...

8 ( +8 / -0 )

The U.S. [. . . ] were ready to start rescue operations, but were told, "No Thank you," by Japanese authorities...

As was the case after the Great Hanshin earthquake - refusing help offered which could have saved lives. It was a disgrace.

No, no alcohol involved in this 1985 crash - but since the JAL president brought it up himself...

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I still have vivid memories of that crash. I think it is hard for those that lost loved ones in the crash and commemorating it every year makes it difficult for them to move on not that they should forget. I think holding the ceremonies every 5 years is better.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"The U.S. military had helicopters in the air, right after the crash, and were ready to start rescue operations, but were told, "No Thank you," by Japanese authorities...

Which by the way, didn't start rescue operations until the next morning, so we're talking about at least 8 or 10 hours had elapsed after the crash... No telling if anyone else may have been saved or not..."

Indeed. The reason for the delay has never been explained by the Japanese authorities. The US military was there and ready to go.

Survivor accounts indicate that many more survived the crash than survived the night. Doctors at the time stated that there appeared to be many who died from exposure or from survivable injuries, but the delays is getting medical assistance to them ultimately resulted in more deaths than necessary.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I agree with drlucifer, these kind of ceremonies should be held every five year. Then it could be lengthened to seven years, then every 10 years, or follow the Buddhist death anniversary count

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

One of the greatest examples of absolute mismanagement and criminal negligence in the history of aviation and rescue work. Many people could have survived if Japan allowed help in and/or even got to work quicker themselves. But nope! Too busy trying to hide what happened so that pretty much no one survived in the end. And then the country almost made the 30th anniversary "Mountain Day" until someone was smart enough to notice the date and they made it the 11th instead.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I remember this as if it were yesterday. There was disquiet in the weeks that followed that the offer of assistance was turned down by the authorities and more lives could have been saved.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I was only 5 years old when this happened, and I still remember it. Maybe one of the first news events I remember. I guess I remember mainly because Kyuu Sakamoto was on the plane, and I remember watching him on TV with my grandmother.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This makes for distressing reading - all the bad decisions made by whoever turned down the offers of help from the US military - a decision that surely led directly to the deaths of survivors left on the mountain overnight - as well as (as far as I can tell) by the pilots, made this far worse than it should have been.

Two JAL employees died by suicide out of guilt. I wonder how often, if at all, the govt. decision-makers consider their own guilt.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan_Airlines_Flight_123

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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