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Rescued crewman dies; records reveal defects with cattle ship sunk off Japan

56 Comments
By Tetsushi Kajimoto and Roslan Khasawneh

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© Thomson Reuters 2020.

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56 Comments
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That's a miracle after all this time in roiling shark-infested waters. Hoping he makes it through.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Positive news!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I can't believe Livestock Carriers" still exist. Decades ago they used to ship live sheep from Australia to the Mid east. But this vessel loaded 5800 head of cows from New Zealand for China.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

Oh. The article has been updated once more, and the guy didn't make it. Harsh news indeed. Many thanks to the search and rescue people for any little thing they can do.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

It's most distressing to see that photo - a living creature who suffered terrible fear before a slow death.

This is the result of gluttony, cruelty, and greed for money.

10 ( +25 / -15 )

pfffff, could have picked a different photo maybe?

0 ( +12 / -12 )

That's a miracle after all this time in roiling shark-infested waters. Hoping he makes it through.

I am going to guess that you posted this before he died and the article was changed?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Cows were locked in cages, how did the cow escape?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Cows were locked in cages, how did the cow escape?

Probably that the ship broke apart in the storm!

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Why this photo ?!!!!

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

Thank you Japan Coast Guard.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Poor cow!

9 ( +14 / -5 )

Sorry but all those cows were in for a horrible end either way. Would've been slaughtered upon reaching their destination.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

another article said they were diary cows--cant milk a dead cow...

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Poor cows indeed. I wouldn't say the waters are "shark infested" though. There's no infestation, they literally live there, it's their home.

19 ( +19 / -0 )

Poor cow yes but even sadder is all the seafarers that lost their lives.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

shark-infested waters.

You would be lucky to find any predator sharks there. They are all caught, fins sliced off and left to die in pain for hours.

7 ( +12 / -5 )

@Maria

totally agree with you...those cows naturally shouldn't be dying in the sea...and they met their sad fate sooner than expected...

5 ( +7 / -2 )

@Jacob Buchner

pfffff, could have picked a different photo maybe?

Why, exactly? It surely is horrible, distressing and saddening to see this.

But that's what live stock trade and the meat and dairy industry is. Cruel and horrible. Just see and admit the truth.

More images like these should actually be shown, especially from the meat factories, in the hopes it would make at least some people think.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Vinke

But that's what live stock trade and the meat and dairy industry is. Cruel and horrible. Just see and admit the truth.

More images like these should actually be shown, especially from the meat factories, in the hopes it would make at least some people think.

I agree on the meat industry, but why dairy? (Apart from that dairy cows probably end up in the former).

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Mare dominus crudelis est

The sea is a cruel master

RIP to all who lost their lives in this tragic accident.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

I remember the story of a man being rescued after being trapped in an air pocket when his ship capsized and sunk a good depth. I hope there are still people alive down there. I've never sailed before and stories like this made me thankful that I still haven't, it's a lanlubber's life for me.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I agree on the meat industry, but why dairy? (Apart from that dairy cows probably end up in the former).

The dairy industry is still the meat industry. In order to make the cows keep providing milk, the calves are taken away from them very soon after birth and either sold for raising until their slaughter as veal, or killed straightaway.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Decades ago they used to ship live sheep from Australia to the Mid east.

They still do. There are petitions on the internet trying to get it to stop, legislation passed recently to get at least exports at the height of the Middle East summer banned because of the distress caused to the animals.

Legislation that the exporters are already trying to get around.

https://www.rspca.org.au/media-centre/news/2020/rspca-seeks-urgent-assurance-al-kuwait-sheep-will-be-protected-dangerous

pfffff, could have picked a different photo maybe?

Like what, a picture of a juicy steak sizzling on a plate? A big fat hamburger sitting in a bun?

Take a good hard look at that picture. That's your steak and your hamburger.

another article said they were diary cows--cant milk a dead cow

Dairy cows have a productive life of around three years, after which they are no longer profitable - and are turned into beef. As are their 'surplus' male calves.

Invalid CSRF

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

OssanAmerica - I can't believe Livestock Carriers" still exist

So, how do you think they ship livestock from one country to another? Submarine?

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

Do the hustleToday  04:06 pm JST

OssanAmerica - I can't believe Livestock Carriers" still exist

So, how do you think they ship livestock from one country to another? Submarine?

I know you're just trying to be smart but maritime transportation of livestock differs from all others in that (1) the distance and time involved and (2) the animals are kept in cages stacked on the main deck exposed to the weather conditions. And unless one has actually sailed and seen weather conditions at sea it's impossible to fully appreciate the impact on anything on deck during an entire voyage. This method was common 50 years ago, and considering the advancements made in all other forms of maritime transportation, I found it surprising that a method which results not just in stress to the animals but cargo damage and loss is still in use.

https://www.eurosender.com/blog/en/livestock-transport/

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Its disgusting that this practice of shipping live cattle still exists. And by NZ of all places.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

@ohara where did you think it went

1 ( +2 / -1 )

GoodlucktoyouToday  03:21 pm JST

shark-infested waters.

You would be lucky to find any predator sharks there. They are all caught, fins sliced off and left to die in pain for hours.

Not sure what relevance that has to the article.

"China is the primary market for shark fin."

https://sharkstewards.org/shark-finning/shark-finning-fin-facts/

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Sounds like the ship wasn’t fit for purpose and in need of scrapping.

RIP the crew sacrificed to the ship owners greed, disregard for their crews and minor details like maintenance and upkeep.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Sad story all around. Loss of human or animal life is tragic. Can not imagine being trapped inside a sinking ship or thrown into the ocean in a typhoon. Good job for the Japanese coast guard. Life is precious and dont waste it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Northernlife,

I was under the impression NZ had stopped live cattle shipments to other countries. There were some disgraceful events re what happened to such cattle when they arrived at their destination, in the past, let alone the actual shipping experience.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There’ll be cows washing ashore all over Japan...

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@Maria

Would you be reacting the same if the ship was carrying commercial goods.

By that being so vocal about the cows and ignoring the human lives lost.

Sure the way the cows died us tragic but cows unlike the people on that ship were not supporting family, their children will not even know they are gone.

The families of these sailors have in all likelihood lost their main source of support.

People like these risk their lives every day not just to bring people livestock, but the vegetables, fruits, etc.. you and the rest of us need, they risk their lives to bring the laptop, PC, smartphone we are presently using to view this story.

Animal rights people seem to have things backwards first let's get all people to care for the rest of the people on this planet once we can do that we can move to the next step.

How anyone expects people to act like animals are equal to humans before we can even treat other humans equally is mindboggling.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

More cows may float all over in water?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I am not against eating meat, but the long-distance life ship transports from Australia and NZ to China and the ME should be stopped. The documentaries about the isssue show horrific images.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

first let's get all people to care for the rest of the people on this planet

One of my long held sentiments also.

Of course it's perfectly ok everyone having other advocacies but for people's lives and welfare to take a backseat to those and sometimes totally forgotten or ignored is really tragic.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

So, how do you think they ship livestock from one country to another? Submarine?

Frozen, already butchered? Crazy idea.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

They were talking about livestock, I guess it means they must be alive

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not sure what relevance that has to the article.

Sharks are innocent parts of a healthy food chain, but are getting slaughtered to extinction. Dairy cows are intelligent land based mammals.

relevance is humans having no respect, spilling oil in the sea and torturing innocent mammals and wildlife for selfish hedonism

not to mention the exploitation of cheap Philippine seafarers.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Animal rights people seem to have things backwards first let's get all people to care for the rest of the people on this planet once we can do that we can move to the next step.

"Right lads, we've finally stopped murdering each other so let's think about giving the whales a bit of peace".

Human decency is not limited to just how we treat other humans. I'm sure the men who poach rhinos are caring towards their families, but that alone does not make them decent human beings.

How anyone expects people to act like animals are equal to humans before we can even treat other humans equally is mindboggling.

I find it mindboggling that you find the idea of being able to simultaneously treat animals and humans with respect as mindboggling.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@ClippetyClop

I find it mindboggling that you find the idea of being able to simultaneously treat animals and humans with respect as mindboggling.

Logic if one stops thinking that the world is made up of only developed countries.

The majority of the world is not made up of developed countries,

1.9 billion live in extreme poverty.

2.5 billion lack proper sanitation

1 billion are in extreme food insecurity another 1.2 billion are bordering food insecure.

So want to know why some person would risk their lives to poach Rhinos? Food, water, etc...

Want him to stop? Then improve his and his family's lives.

Why were most of the crew on this ship Filipino? Because it is a dirty, dangerous job that most westerners will no longer do and don't care what happens to other people as long as they get their things cheap not just their meet but their tofu, smartphones, cruelty free cotton shirt made in a sweatshop employing under aged children.

Try selling the animal rights thing to these people and see how far that get you.

No we cannot do both at the same time because we just don't have the resources. Fix the first problem then we have the time, resources and a far more willing world population.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Human lives must be taken seriously. Who is responsible for this ,,?.??

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Before getting all worked up about the cows, we should be asking why was the crew nearly all Filipino?

And, why would they continue to work on a ship they most likely knew was not safe?

The answer is simple, poverty.

Yes people of the developed world our meat, vegetables, PC's, smartphones, vegan or non vegan friendly clothing, food, etc.. gets to us on these same ship, one day it is Cows, the next trip sweatshop made cruelty free clothing.

The cows date is tragic, but the real tragedy are the human lives lost doing a job few from the rich countries are willing to do but want their tofu and hamburgers cheaply.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

According to this they have found a third crew member in a life raft, alive and well!

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/japan-ship-sinks-survivor-speaks/

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How come they dont rescue the poor cows?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Its disgusting that this practice of shipping live cattle still exists. And by NZ of all places.

Brazil, New Zealand and others ship livestock by sea routinely to the Middle East where it is extremely difficult to raise cattle due to the climate and lack of fodder, and centuries old practices that are not suddenly going to change in our lifetime or that of our grand children tend to favor butchering live cattle and sheep for immediate consumption. The great majority of such shipments are uneventful. And oh by the way tell us why this is any worse that shipping cattle by truck or rail? Imagine a double deck cattle truck rolling across the desert southwest in the US in 45 C degree heat.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

How come they dont rescue the poor cows?

They're dead.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Why were most of the crew on this ship Filipino? Because it is a dirty, dangerous job that most westerners will no longer do and don't care what happens to other people as long as they get their things cheap not just their meet but their tofu, smartphones, cruelty free cotton shirt made in a sweatshop employing under aged children.

It's not quite that pat. You find plenty of sailors out there from developed nations but they are almost always sailing ships that are protected by cabotage laws such as the Jones Act in the US. Most maritime nations have laws that require ships operating between two domestic ports to be crewed by citizens of that nation and that the ships be registered or "flagged" in that nation. Sometimes as with the Jones Act the ships themselves must be built in the same nation too. Foreign flagged ships and foreign crews are usually prohibited from hauling cargos between two domestic ports. This tends to make these domestic only shippers extremely expensive and thus companies like Matson Lines, Crowley Marine or TOTE Marine are not competitive with big global shippers that are free to flag their ships wherever convenient and hire crews from all nations. But there are first world citizens doing the hard work of operating ships in all weather, crews are aren't afraid of getting dirty (find out how rough it is operating coastal and river barges in the US or doing offshore oil support boat work) and there are tragic mishaps just like this cattle ship loss. Read about the loss of the SS El Faro a couple of years ago on a run from Jacksonville to San Juan Puerto Rico, Same scenario, hurricane, ship looses power and eventually capsizes with all hands lost. This was an American built, flagged and crewed ship. The problem is that for the international maritime companies, low cost matters. Shippers will abandon them in a heartbeat over small differences in price so they all seek the least costly crews and ships possible.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Desert Tortoise

Ok I looked up SS El Faro noticed the former crew called it a rust bucket that should never have been out.

I also did a bit of looking up the crew that went down with the ship.

Interesting to see the difference between the crew and the Captain, first mate, engineers and the majority of the crew.

I will leave it at that but I will speculate that the ones doing the grunt work on the ship didn't come from any well off corner of the USA.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Those who buy Meat/dairy product openly support the destruction of forest around the world. You only need to look at New Zealand as a prime example. Those 'beautiful' green rolling hills used to be native forest before the Europeans arrived. Very sad and nobody seems to care as long as they can eat rotting flesh, their god given right.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If anyone here as written, Why don't you care about the animals? in response to posts grieving the loss of the crew, I must have missed it. But the reverse appears to be acceptable, with the inevitable whataboutery.

It's up to each person what they choose to focus on in this tragedy, be it the company's faults, the crew's straitened backgrounds, or the animals' tortured existence.

How dare some hoarder dictate what others must write. and think about.

Six thousand cows on one - just one ship. How many ships cross waters every day? That's a lot of suffering - to steal another species' breast milk.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I will leave it at that but I will speculate that the ones doing the grunt work on the ship didn't come from any well off corner of the USA.

The majority of the officers will have graduated from one of several merchant marine academies or be Navy or Coast Guard veterans. The deck hand work their way up from the bottom. Nothing wrong with either.

But find out what they are paid. They are making six figures a year, even the deck hands. Many will work six month contracts at sea then work as longshoremen between contracts. it's not office work but they make more than I do with a masters degree, not that I would consider trading places with them. I had my fun at sea. Now I sleep in my own bed. But that high pay is one of the reasons companies protected by cabotage laws like the Jones Act are uncompetitive internationally. Not the only reason but a major one. American shipyards are likewise hopelessly uncompetitive.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ok I looked up SS El Faro noticed the former crew called it a rust bucket that should never have been out.

One of thousands of such ships globally. Read a maritime blog called "g-Captain". You would be surprised how many ships collide, hit docks and bring those big container cranes crashing down, catch fire (a big oil tanker is on fire off Sri Lanka right now), capsize, run aground or just disappear with no trace. Iron ore and especially bauxite can under certain circumstances behave like a liquid and make a big ship instantly unstable. There's an auto hauler laying on her side off Kings Bay Georgia right now being dismantled after capsizing. Auto haulers catch fire all the time. Big North Sea and Baltic ferries capsize in rough seas when the cars and trucks break loose and slide to one side of the ship or the bow door is forced open by waves. Most land lubbers have no idea of the dangers inherent in taking ships to sea.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Six thousand cows on one - just one ship. How many ships cross waters every day? That's a lot of suffering - to steal another species' breast milk.

Milk cows LOVE being milked. Even when they aren't going to be fed, which they know. They still run to be milked.

Ever been on a big cruise ship? That's 4500+ humans ON ONE SHIP! Just one ship! They put at least 2 to every tiny room. It's crazy.

Let's just all it a "cultural difference."

0 ( +0 / -0 )

ThIs horrific cruelty towards a sentient creature is barbaric and primitive. Pregnant cows expected to endure this frightening voyage. What is gods name is NZ exporting live animals to a Country that has zero animal welfare, void of kindness and compassion by those who kill all sorts to feed their faces with animal flesh. RIP to those animals who had no choice to be treated so cruelly at the hands of humanunkind. Shame on NZ.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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