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Survivors of Japanese Americans jailed in desert worry wind farm will overshadow past

32 Comments
By ED KOMENDA and LINDSEY WASSON

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32 Comments
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It was a travesty of justice that it appears the US has learned from, as evidenced by the refusal for mass incarnation of Muslims after 9/11.

The site is a reminder of not netting whole shoals when after a specific fish. It must remain, but I don't see how it cannot share the land with wind turbines.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

“If Minidoka was a white memorial to white soldiers who died in whatever war it is, do you think that they would offer free land to Lava Ridge to develop their windmills there?” Tomita said. "Hell no.”

Except no one died there, apparently?

4 ( +11 / -7 )

Survivors of Japanese Americans jailed in desert worry wind farm will overshadow past

Those stories and memories will go with the wind

-13 ( +3 / -16 )

My father was 24 and in the Army Reserves on the East Coast when that took place. I once asked him if he was aware of the incarceration of Japanese-Americans, and he told me, "We knew, and we didn't like it, but there was nothing we could do."

10 ( +10 / -0 )

The land should remain empty and as it was when it ended. People died there.

-8 ( +4 / -12 )

wallaceToday 05:45 pm JST

The land should remain empty and as it was when it ended. People died there.

You have some proof that someone died specifically due to the conditions at this camp?

3 ( +9 / -6 )

Never ends.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

People died in the camps. You think no one died during that period. I never said anything other than "People died there". If they had not been interned there it would not have happened.

How many died from health issues and lack of medical care?

A total of 1,862 people died from medical problems while in the internment camps.

Did the conditions of the camp cause that, I do not know.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

Did the conditions of the camp cause that, I do not know.

You dont want to know. The answer to your question is No.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Toblerone

Did the conditions of the camp cause that, I do not know.

> You don't want to know. The answer to your question is No.

Actually, you don't know that but I suggest research would probably reveal something of the truth. The camps were harsh and basic.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

"Within the camps, Japanese Americans endured dehumanizing conditions including poor housing and food, a lack of privacy, inadequate medical care, and substandard education."

I think that would lead to deaths and premature ones too.

"There were a few isolated incidents of internees' being shot and killed."

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Is that from wikipedia?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@ TaiwanIsNotChina

“Except no one died there, apparently?”

Would you like to be incarcerated in the Minidoka camp for four years if you wouldn’t die?

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Toblerone

Is that from wikipedia?

No there are official sites.

https://www.nps.gov/miin/index.htm

Or how about the Library of Congress?

https://www.loc.gov/classroom-materials/immigration/japanese/behind-the-wire/

I am sure you'll have no problem finding material.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Some of our in laws were in the Manzanar internment camp in California. Beginning in 1943, they were encouraged to leave the camps, as long as they did not stay in the Western Exclusion Zones.

Some of our Japanese American relatives fought in the US Army. Twenty thousand Japanese Americans served in the Army during the war. Four thousand Japanese Americans were allowed to leave the camps to attend college. The Japanese Americans living east of the West Coast exclusion zones were not required to be interned. Of the 150,000 Japanese Americans living in Hawaii, fewer than two thousand were interned.

Some of our family members asked to be repatriated back to Japan. Those who were repatriated back to Japan asked to come back to the States after the war, and they were allowed to do so. America could be very forgiving.

Billions of dollars in reparations were paid to former internees, although even that was not equivalent to the value of the property confiscated from Japanese Americans on the West Coast.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Attu and Kiska islands in Alaska were occupied early in the war by Japanese forces. All Japanese Americans living in Alaska were forcibly relocated.

By 1943, when it became clear outside of Japan that Japan was a threat which would be militarily defeated, fear of Japanese Americans in the States receded. However, the inhumane treatment and murder of both military and civilian prisoners by the IJA generated intense hatred of Japan, which lasted decades.

Of the millions of German and Italian descendants living in the States, only a few thousand were interned. One such camp was within walking distance from where we currently live in Southern California.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"As part of a reparations package, the government paid $20,000 to every living survivor of the internment camps and issued an apology that acknowledged a "grave injustice" that was "motivated largely by racial prejudice, wartime hysteria, and a failure of political leadership." In total, $1.6 billion was paid out."

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

When Biden became president he cancelled new oil and gas pipelines on federal land. Minidoka is the wrong place to build a huge wind farm and substructure.

The topic is about building that on a historical site.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

The internment of Americans of Japanese ancestry is a very interesting part of WW2 history. The book Snow Falling on Cedars (not the movie) is worth the effort.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_Falling_on_Cedars

It puts a human spin on the interment affair and is quite the melancholy tear jerker.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It's ironic that some say that China, Korea and other Asian nations should forget and move on from the atrocities and murders committed by the Japanese in WWII cause well.....it was a long time ago but feel that history in this situation should not be forgotten.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

So Japanese treated badly during WW2 bad but Koreans or Chinese treated badly by Japanese was all in the past.

The Japan of today treats all people of Japanese ancestry as if they are loyal subjects. It was more so 75 years ago.

Japanese Americans were a risk. A tiny risk but why take the chance?

War is not nice in so many ways.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

Trying to erase unfavorable history like the creation of labor day to hide the massacre in the real labor day in May 1.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If you look at a race who interned other races you can only point fingers to one. Nothing has changed only time.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Japanese Americans are not Japanese citizens. They never attacked the US but were interned.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

kaimycahlNov. 11 10:48 pm JST

If you look at a race who interned other races you can only point fingers to one. Nothing has changed only time.

Seriously? You think only white people kept slaves?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The Minidoka National Historic Site is only on six acres. I do not see how six acres, more or less, is so important to the development of clean energy. Is the plan to put wind turbines only in the national park?

On the other hand, IMO, wind power is a symbol of humanities commitment to a better tomorrow, and is not disrespectful to anyone.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

humanity's

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Don’t worry, nobody’s going to forget WWII …not yet.

Give it another 50 years

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Japanese Americans were a risk. A tiny risk but why take the chance?

The US imprisoned whole families of US citizens, not Japanese immigrants to the US but born in the US citizens, forced them to abandon their farms and businesses (note, before WWII Japanese Americans were prominent in west coast and in particular California agriculture) and in violation of their tights as citizens. As a citizen your racial or ethnic background does not somehow reduce your rights but during WWII the US did exactly that, imprisoning US citizens because they had Japanese ancestry. It was wrong then, war or no war.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The Minidoka National Historic Site is only on six acres. I do not see how six acres, more or less, is so important to the development of clean energy. Is the plan to put wind turbines only in the national park?

That six measly acres is the problem. There could potentially be huge wind turbines standing taller than the Space Needle in Seattle butting up against the historic site. These wind turbines probably should be located far away from the historic site so they don't intrude on the experience.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

1glennNov. 11  06:56 pm JST

By 1943, when it became clear outside of Japan that Japan was a threat which would be militarily defeated, fear of Japanese Americans in the States receded. However, the inhumane treatment and murder of both military and civilian prisoners by the IJA generated intense hatred of Japan, which lasted decades.

The latter is just an excuse for racism. Hating American citizens when they have nothing to do with the IJA was wrong. Just as those who attack Americans today because they dress or look like "the bad guys" is wrong.

"Joseph Czuba, 71, is charged in the fatal stabbing of six-year-old Wadea Al-Fayoume and the wounding of Hanaan Shahin on Oct. 14. Authorities said the victims were targeted because of their Muslim faith and as a response to the war between Israel and Hamas."

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/illinois-man-pleads-not-guilty-to-hate-crime-and-murder-charges-in-attack-on-muslim-mother-and-son

1 ( +1 / -0 )

the life-changing atrocity 

Yeah, sorry, but I don't think he has the faintest idea what that means.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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