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U.S. Embassy sounds alarm on coronavirus in Japan

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Shame the US doesn't practice what it preaches.

9 ( +25 / -16 )

Shame the US doesn't practice what it preaches.

It most certainly does. The U.S. has been the most transparent of all nations regarding information and testing.

-20 ( +14 / -34 )

I think the U.S. is doing a pretty good job overall considering how big the country is and how many people want to do there own thing there. I think they came up with the phrase "social distance"

-11 ( +12 / -23 )

Pot calling the kettle black.

Should create quite a conundrum here for the Yanks and others that love to bash on all things Japan.

0 ( +19 / -19 )

It most certainly does. The U.S. has been the most transparent of all nations regarding information and testing.

Riiiiiight. And how do you explain why U.S. Navy Captain Brett Crozier got fired?

11 ( +22 / -11 )

Should create quite a conundrum here for the Yanks and others that love to bash on all things Japan.

You could literally say this about every nationally. There are people who enjoy living in Japan and there are others who constantly bash it. Please don't paint us all with the same brush.

9 ( +14 / -5 )

Why would anyone want to leave Japan just to go back to the states at a time like this?

20 ( +25 / -5 )

It continues to fascinate me how people simply make up 'facts' when a simple online search refutes these 'facts.' One figures that with the internet and easily available information, people would be more diligent about what they post online. Sadly, the reverse has been true.

The United States leads in coronavirus cases but has been reactive, a huge mess of contradictory information from various political figures and public agencies. During the early days when coronavirus cases started popping up in America, officials were hardly transparent, and in fact did what they could to keep a veil of secrecy on crucial information that citizens could have used to better protect themselves.

Like I said, the pot calling the kettle black.

The United States leads in coronavirus cases, but not pandemic response

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/04/united-states-leads-coronavirus-cases-not-pandemic-response#

How Much Should the Public Know about Who has the Coronavirus?

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/28/us/coronavirus-data-privacy.html

 When the first case of the coronavirus in Silicon Valley was discovered in late January, health officials were faced with a barrage of questions: What city did the patient live in? Whom had he come in contact with? Which health clinic had he visited before he knew he was infected?

Dr. Sara Cody, the chief health officer for Santa Clara County, which has a population of two million across 15 cities, declined to give details.

“I can’t give the city,” she said, adding “we are not going to be giving out information about where he sought health care.”

As the coronavirus spreads across the United States the limited disclosure of data by officials would seem to be a footnote to the suffering and economic disruptions that the disease is causing.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

Japan needs trusted leaders like Dr. Anthony Fauci and Governor Andrew Como to supply transparent fact based information and advice with daily updates. Most of all Japan needs to shut down: businesses, schools, restaurants and get those trains to be much less packed like virus incubators. NOW. No more urging or suggesting.

This is WAR.

-3 ( +11 / -14 )

The U.S. has been the most transparent of all nations regarding information and testing.

Demonstrably untrue.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-us-embassy-in-tokyo-refused-to-test-exposed-staff-for-coronavirus

12 ( +17 / -5 )

At times like this I would definitely prefer to stay in Japan rather than going back to the US...the number of cases is out of control. I feel a lot safer here!!!

14 ( +17 / -3 )

 And how do you explain why U.S. Navy Captain Brett Crozier got fired?

Operational security? Maybe it's not a good idea to announce to the entire world that a carrier battle group is effectively out of operation due to the pandemic?

0 ( +6 / -6 )

"The Japanese Government's decision to not test broadly makes it difficult to accurately assess the COVID-19 prevalence rate," the Embassy said on its website, referring to the illness caused by the virus.

this I agree with.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Each State is currently running like its own country with its own rules in regards to this crisis. Some are doing a more fantastic job than others. So people here need to stop acting like they know what is going on based on lame Trump speeches and bodies piling up in NYC.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Should test more? Less coronavirus deaths seem less infections here. More deaths seem more infections. Test is no need for thousands of people per day. Japan seems safer as so many people often wash hands, wear masks ever before virus outbreak, no hugging, no kissing and also no kissing to pets,, etc.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

US guys at the office say Trump's "policies" are to protect his hotel business, not Americans. They will stay in Japan.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

On a different site, the primary reason the State Dept issued this warning was the lack of widespread testing. Have lost a lot of faith and trust with PM Abe and gained respect for Mayor Koike--she is trying her best to raise the sense of urgency.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

respect for Mayor Koike--she is trying her best to raise the sense of urgency.....

…..now that the Olympics have been postponed.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

While it's true I'm not happy with the way the Japanese government has handled things, there's no way I'm going back to the U.S. during the biggest public health crisis of our time without health insurance. Thanks, but no thanks.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

If U.S. citizens wanted to return to the United States from Japan they should do so now, or risk remaining abroad for an"indefinite period", it said.

But U.S. citizens who live here won't be allowed re-entry into Japan should they decide to go back to the States, so stranded in the U.S. Got a wife, kids, job in Japan? SOL for you if you leave Japan, your PR won't help. Only "special" permanent residents, i.e., Koreans and Chinese who are de facto Japanese but don't have J-passports.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

The US Embassy is right about Tokyo's own misguided approach to a global pandemic.

Would I go back there now, of course not. I don't want to be treated in a Japanese hospital either, which will soon enough be overrun, but at least any of us that fall ill won't wind up bankrupt as a result of illness.

And ultimately this is the job of any nation's embassy. Germany did the same thing recently, casting doubt on Japan's opaque and exceptionalist approach. Their job is to alert their citizens of risks and reality, especially in nations where you cannot trust your leaders.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

america ---- a joke.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

But U.S. citizens who live here won't be allowed re-entry into Japan should they decide to go back to the States, so stranded in the U.S. Got a wife, kids, job in Japan? SOL for you if you leave Japan, your PR won't help.

Not true. PR status and/or family in Japan mean you will be allowed in.

From the US embassy in Japan: ...and unless the foreign national has special exceptional circumstances, the foreign national will be subject to denial of landing (See note). In cases where a foreign national with the status of residence of “Permanent Resident” , “Spouse or Child of Japanese National” , “Spouse or Child of Permanent Resident” or “Long-Term Resident” departed from Japan on or before April 2, 2020 with re-entry permission (including special re-entry permission; the same applies hereinafter) (including the spouse of a Japanese national or Japanese child who does not have these statuses of residence; hereinafter the same applies), will be considered, in principle, to come under special exceptional circumstances. Foreign nationals who departed from Japan with re-entry permission on or after April 3, even if they have one of the abovementioned statuses of residence are, in principle, subject to refusal of landing without special exceptional circumstances.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

"Foreign nationals who departed from Japan with re-entry permission on or after April 3, even if they have one of the above mentioned statuses of residence are, in principle, subject to refusal of landing without special exceptional circumstances."

But the rules are being changed or updated frequently. Foreigners in Japan should not travel unless unavoidable.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Zichi, the wording is contradictory, since the previous paragraph defines "special exceptional circumstances" as including those statuses. From what I have heard, the practice is that permanent residents and those with family are not being denied entry, though they may be detained at the airport for a while.

But of course you are right in that travel is something best avoided until this all clears up.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

If anyone cares to read today's update, it is here http://www.moj.go.jp/content/001316999.pdf

0 ( +3 / -3 )

commanter

yes I understand that people with "special exceptional circumstance" won't be denied entry but like nationals must do two weeks quarantine.

But the events are changing daily so stay put.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@commanteer

Not true. PR status and/or family in Japan mean you will be allowed in.

That is only true if you left no later than April 2.

"Foreign nationals who departed from Japan with re-entry permission on or after April 3, even if they have one of the above mentioned statuses of residence are, in principle, subject to refusal of landing without special exceptional circumstances."

All bets are off now. After April 3, it doesn't matter what your status is. If you are a foreign national and leave after April 3, you will be refused entry unless you are Korean with special status until further notice.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

All bets are off now. After April 3, it doesn't matter what your status is. If you are a foreign national and leave after April 3, you will be refused entry unless you are Korean with special status until further notice.

That's not at all clear if you read the entire notice. Rather than post misinformation, I wish people would post links to substantiate their claims. It's confusing enough as is.

For example, an actual report of someone with PR being denied landing would be something solid.

Not saying it can't happen. It could, which is just one reason travel is not a good idea. But rather than posting conjectures, actual facts would be more useful. Speaking personally, I wouldn't leave the country now in any case, unless it really was an exceptional circumstance.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

All bets are off now. After April 3, it doesn't matter what your status is. If you are a foreign national and leave after April 3, you will be refused entry unless you are Korean with special status until further notice.

But that not what the rule states.

"Foreign nationals who departed from Japan with re-entry permission on or after April 3, even if they have one of the above mentioned statuses of residence are, in principle, subject to refusal of landing without special exceptional circumstances."

Foreigners with special exceptional circumstances will not be denied reentry.

But still not the best time to travel even if you can find a flight.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@commanteer

Foreign nationals who departed from Japan with re-entry permission on or after April 3, even if they have one of the abovementioned statuses of residence are, in principle, subject to refusal of landing without special exceptional circumstances.

I posted my comment today, April 4, so...actually...true? I think what we've fleshed out is what special exceptional circumstances entail.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

No matter your opinion of how the U.S. has handled this pandemic so far, this message to take action quickly is still valid.

As I've been saying.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

For example, an actual report of someone with PR being denied landing would be something solid.

Not saying it can't happen. It could, which is just one reason travel is not a good idea. But rather than posting conjectures, actual facts would be more useful. Speaking personally, I wouldn't leave the country now in any case, unless it really was an exceptional circumstance.

@Commanteer

They makes no sense! The rule went into affect yesterday. What person with PR left the country yesterday then returned today. Not to mention, if a PR holder plans to return less than one year from departure then they would not need a re-entry permit.

*in principle, *subject to refusal of landing without special exceptional circumstances."

@commanteer and zichi

Do you understand that exceptional circumstances means?

Permanent Resident” , “Spouse or Child of Japanese National” , “Spouse or Child of Permanent Resident” or “Long-Term Resident” are exceptional circumstances if it all happens before April 2.

On April 3, “Spouse or Child of Japanese National” , “Spouse or Child of Permanent Resident” or “Long-Term Resident” are not exceptional circumstances.

Therefore, all bets are off!

Reading is fundamental!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

If U.S. citizens wanted to return to the United States from Japan they should do so now, or risk remaining abroad for an"indefinite period", it said.

I'm not sure if their homeland is safer than Japan. Japan's death toll and critically ill patient numbers are much lower.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

if a PR holder plans to return less than one year from departure then they would not need a re-entry permit.

PR holders automatically have what's called a "special re-entry permit." Which is what they confusingly call no need for a re-entry permit. So, it does make sense according to their terminology.

On April 3, “Spouse or Child of Japanese National” , “Spouse or Child of Permanent Resident” or “Long-Term Resident” are not exceptional circumstances.

The document does not say that. Its description of April 3rd travel is too poorly written to be clear on what entails exceptional circumstances.

Reading is fundamental!

I agree. Surely, an excellent reader like yourself can understand that nobody can determine what is meant by the paragraph describing departures after April 3.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Sheesh... when the Trump admin is calling you out on a lack of testing, you really must be the worst in the world.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Sheesh... when the Trump admin is calling you out on a lack of testing, you really must be the worst in the world.

Not really, Japan could show its people and the world it’s on this and not make the mistakes Trump did in the very beginning, but they’re stumbling worse than Trump and they continue to fail...miserably.

-9 ( +0 / -9 )

"The Japanese Government's decision to not test broadly makes it difficult to accurately assess the COVID-19 prevalence rate," the Embassy said"

This is absolutely correct. But no country has an "accurate" assessment of the prevalence rate because those infected may be asymptomatic. But it is also correct that Japan does not have the kind of death rate that would suggest case numbers on a par with nations like the US, Italy, Spain, etc. Japan's fear is not high case numbers, their fear is a high number of severe cases which may overwhelm their medical system as has already happened in Italy.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Per this article If U.S. citizens wanted to return to the United States from Japan they should do so now, or risk remaining abroad for an"indefinite period", it said.

I will take my chances with "indefinite period". There post is more realistic with the old adage, out of the frying pan and into the fire!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

bass4funk: "Not really, Japan could show its people and the world it’s on this and not make the mistakes Trump did in the very beginning, but they’re stumbling worse than Trump and they continue to fail...miserably."

Well, it's good to know you can admit Trump has been failing, and that Japan should not follow that example (even though they are), but you still kind of prove my point. I said they must be the worst in the world for testing if they are even being called out by the US, which is #1 for being the worst in the world for handling the virus and testing up until they increased the latter dramatically when Trump finally got scared. So, now you've got a nation (the US) that has been lacking in most things regarding the virus, and is STILL not testing enough, citing Japan as not testing enough. Ergo, if the US is saying Japan is a danger and cites the lack of testing, it must mean Japan is REALLY behind -- proving my point.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

OssanAmerica: "But it is also correct that Japan does not have the kind of death rate that would suggest case numbers on a par with nations like the US, Italy, Spain, etc."

It's correct they don't have the death rate because they have not been testing! It really isn't that difficult for most people to comprehend; I'm not sure why it's so hard for you to swallow. What's Japan's testing rate, including autopsy, compared to the rest of the developed, and even "undeveloped" world? There was a good Japanese article out this morning that points out Japan may very well have a MUCH bigger outbreak than they know of (or know of but are hiding, like for the Olympics) because there has not been proper testing.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

I read the rule incorrectly and sought advice from the British Embassy.

Any non Japanese leaving Japan will not be able to return regardless of their circumstances., until the rule is relaxed.

British Ambassador

https://twitter.com/UKinJapan/status/1245953521591222275?s=20

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Thanks, zichi. That was much more useful and specific than the USA ambassador's announcement. "In principle" does allow a little wiggle room, but most airlines would probably not allow you to board flights to Japan anyway. So basically, no travel outside the country unless you don't mind not returning until the rule is lifted.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The article gave me a chuckle. The US criticizing the Japanese response to this pandemic? That would be funny, if it weren't sad.

We have been staying at home most of the time for the last several weeks here in California, and so far it looks like it has worked, in so far as leveling the curve goes. Who knows what the future brings, but so far things are OK here. Too bad we don't have competent national leadership.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I think this warning was poorly worded because it makes it sound like ALL Americans should go back to the US even if they live here.

The UK embassy in Tokyo is much more nuanced and says people who live abroad aren't being instructed to go back for the sake of it, it's only for people travelling...

2 ( +3 / -1 )

PR holders automatically have what's called a "special re-entry permit." Which is what they confusingly call no need for a re-entry permit. So, it does make sense according to their terminology.

@commanteer

You are trying to pick up the pieces of your misunderstanding.PR holder don't have a "special re-entry permit". They are simply treated like Japanese nationals in some ways other than voting rights and this stimulus package. That is why OR holders can use the same lines as returning Japanese nationals at the airport.

If a PR holder stays away from Japan longer than a year then they need to apply for a re-entry permit like other foreign residents. They must return within 5-years or before their PR card expires for a renewal of the card. If they don't, they lose their PR status.

I read the rule incorrectly and sought advice from the British Embassy.

Any non Japanese leaving Japan will not be able to return regardless of their circumstances., until the rule is relaxed.

@zichi

So, like I said earlier, you and @Commanteer read it wrong, and I was right!

Thank you for the honesty! We all make mistakes!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Appreciation to the Embassy for doing this. Its a much better response than what we saw during 3/11

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I get state department and embassy messages secured. This article is mistaking and sending out false info.

misquoting is not smart and causes panic.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Commanteer

I agree. Surely, an excellent reader like yourself can understand that nobody can determine what is meant by the paragraph describing departures after April 3.

It seems like you are making excuses for being wrong!

That's not at all clear if you read the entire notice. Rather than post misinformation, I wish people would post links to substantiate their claims. It's confusing enough as is.

My thoughts exactly when I read your previous posts!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

PR holder don't have a "special re-entry permit".

It’s called ‘assumed re-entry’, and yes we do.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Special reentry permit:

http://www.immi-moj.go.jp/english/tetuduki/zairyuu/specialre-entrypermit.html

0 ( +4 / -4 )

@Strangerland

It’s called ‘assumed re-entry’, and yes we do.

You are wrong! Exempted does not mean 'assumed'! You are making things up! There is no mention of an "assumed" re-entry permit on the government website!

Do all Japanese citizens have assumed re-entry visas too?

***exempted** from obtaining an ordinary re-entry permit, when re-entering Japan within one year from the date of his/her departure.*

Most re-entry permits last one-year. PR holders re-entry permits last longer because they don't need a re-entry permit for trips shorter than a year. Therefore, they are exempt for the first year like Japanese citizens are always exempt!.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

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