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Young Indonesians train to fill caregiver jobs for aging Japanese

28 Comments
By Zahra Matarani

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28 Comments
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Give these young Indonesian people a path to permanent residency in Japan otherwise the paltry salaries and potentially poor conditions they'll be working in may see many return home quick smart .

18 ( +27 / -9 )

Yeah, but the news has got out that this is just a slave salary paid for a very grueling job that in Japan has no path but to be sent on your way after 5 years and having to jump through hoops. Thay can't even fall in love and get married on these visas. Slave labor.

-13 ( +14 / -27 )

I have only this to say to those Indonesians thinking of coming here: run, don't walk, away! What may look like a "promising" job in Japan is filled with long hours, low pay and a bunch of ingraites.

-11 ( +22 / -33 )

They better choose a different destination.

If they want to remain in Asia other countries offer better working conditions,human rights treatments and better salaries with options to make a life in their destination countries.

The LDP ultra conservative ojaji are not seeking for these people coming from abroad to give them a good like but just spoil them and send them back.

-16 ( +13 / -29 )

exploitation of cheap asians.thats all.

-8 ( +10 / -18 )

First was the Philippines, then Viet Nam, Laos and Cambodia, now Indonesian. Japan is running out of countries to look to for help.

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

Give these young Indonesian people a path to permanent residency in Japan 

That’s absolutely what needs to happen.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

I live across the road from an old people home - the care staff are all young Filipina girls. Apart from then I only see ambulances regularly arrive and depart…

3 ( +4 / -1 )

"I think the reason Japan chooses us is because Indonesian youths are very capable of caring for the elderly," said Maesaroh, who is attending the Onodera User Run school in Indonesia's capital, Jakarta.

Not really.

Japan doesn’t have a choice and it will have those willing to take low wages.

The wage of a fully qualified nurse dealing in specialist matters is 400,000 yen

A non specialist half that.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

Good luck to them. They will be used, abused, underappreciated and then sent packing unceremoniously. Wham, bam and barely a "Thank you, ma'am."

-12 ( +2 / -14 )

180,000 yen per month before taxes.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

I’d like to spend some of my retirement days studying.

WW2 has always interested me. I might be able to to read a small fraction of the books written on the subject.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I know this Mexican woman,her mother has dementia,she is the primary caregiver,I know it taken it taken a lot out of her mentally,I always do a little favor for her,and see how she holding up, I go and check on her

1 ( +1 / -0 )

A very good idea? Japanese is not an easy language to learn quickly! And, because Japan's old population is growing rapidly every day, Japan will have to be in a hurry to employ more trained foreigners - in this case young Indonesians. It will be much easier for young Indonesians to learn Japanese if they are shipped to Japan first, so that they can hear and practise speaking Japanese being spoken every day. But even then, it won't be easy and, it may take several years before they can understand and speak Japanese fluently. In any country, old people are often hard-of-hearing and, their pronunciation of their own language may confuse their young Indonesian carers. And the pronunciation and understanding of the Indonesians carers may be difficult for old Japanese people to understand. It won't be an easy idea to carry out successfully and, it is also going to take Japan very many years to train Indonesian carers of old Japanese people successfully and, the cost for the Government will climb to many millions if not billions of yen. This is not a very good idea or plan to train foreigners to care for Japan's growing numbers of old people. Why not train young Japanese successfully in a few months for the job and alleviate the jobbing market as well?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Why not train young Japanese successfully in a few months for the job

Because not many young Japanese want to work as carers?

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

More slave labor disguised as an "opportunity". They're better off seeking work in countries that actually value their employees and have in place, proper human and employee rights.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

I work with Indonesian people; they are kind and work hard and so I hope they are given fair wages and respect that they will deserve for the hard work they must endure in this field.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

What happens if patients need to be restrained?

Dementia is a problem, right?

Foreigners tying up Japanese?

Doesn’t make for a positive image nor does it preclude the possibility of irate relatives complaining about ill treatment.

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

There are 10 young Indonesians nearby being paid less than sen Yen per hour and living in slum like conditions sharing one room. I wonder if this treatment is even legal.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

Why not train young Japanese successfully in a few months for the job

If you have ever worked in the facilities, or a hospital, you would instantly understand why. Underpaid, crappy work conditions, and a host of other reasons, will explain why these jobs are not being filled.

These "helpers" are on the bottom of the totem pole of any facility, and they get treated like crap.

It's not surprising to me at all that these ongoing program is not successful for the things these trainees have to go through to even get a position.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Indonesians who choose Japan over NZ, Australia or Canada are either desperate or are Japanophiles like I was.

Or just simply don't know what its like living and working here.

they'll find out soon enough.

There are 10 young Indonesians nearby being paid less than sen Yen per hour and living in slum like conditions sharing one room.

There you go.

I wonder if this treatment is even legal.

In Japan, legal is a grey area.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Good luck to them. They will be used, abused, underappreciated and then sent packing unceremoniously. Wham, bam and barely a "Thank you, ma'am.

exactly!

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

My Japanese wife's grandmother spent her last years in a home/hospital for elderly. There was abuse such as pinching when the patients wouldn't eat, pulling out toenails for who knows what reason.

This is what happens when you have poorly trained and poorly paid staff being in charge of elderly patients.

It's sadly common here in Japan, and I can share from experience, it's a hell of a lot worse than the examples you gave here, in some places!

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

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