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Abe pledges all-out efforts to locate missing people in typhoon-hit areas

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Prime Minister Pledge and his blue overalls,

Sounds like a great kids' TV cartoon.......I will let you use it for a 10% royalty fee.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

oh great, he added a hat!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Sure would have meant a lot more last week...or 5 days ago. Now he wants to step up the hunt for corpses while the living are still trying to put their lives back together and need help.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Found his true calling as a yakult delivery person?

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Abe is really tone deaf, isn't he?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The government will do everything it can. We will make all-out efforts in searching for missing people and in restoring rivers and lifeline services," the premier told Nagano Gov Shuichi Abe during the meeting at the prefectural government office.

Yeah, and you said something similar after all the other disasters that have occurred while you have been PM and far too many are still waiting!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Abe has just, just literally lost a chunk, of his voting base and has pledged to find them, good luck with that.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Well, let’s hope this is one pledge he actually sees through. However, his match record is not very good.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Abe has more unfulfilled pledges than Greek Week at a major university.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@ Kobe White Bar Owner

perfect!!!!! (⌒▽⌒)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Can't other people do this? We don't need the photo op.... I mean... it's the economy flatlining?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Using people's misfortune as a cheap way to get vote! Does he have no shame?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I've been asking here and elsewhere  if it's worth building a new base at Henoko for the U.S. Marines. The Okinawa Prefecture estimates, based on statistics of the construction of Iwakuni Base, to amount to 2.5 trillion yen.

Can't this money be appropriated for the reconstruction of flood-/typhoon-devastated areas? Banks should be strengthened by driving in concrete or steel piles to prevent future collapses. Note that the government is planning to drive in 77,000 piles at Henoko for land reclamation on the side of Oura Bay.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's reported that banks at 177 points in 71 rivers collapsed by the torrential rains brought by Typhoon Higibis last week, repeating the infliction of enormous damage as if it were an annual affair. 

I've always wondered why they don't strengthen river banks by driving concrete piles into them. 

Instead of 77,000 piles to be driven into the mayonnaise-like seabed off Henoko, Nago City, Okinawa, they should use these piles to prevent potentially weak river banks all across Japan from collapsing.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The Chikuma River is one of the longest in the country, 367 km so it would be very expensive to reinforce the entire lengths of river bank which would total 734 km. Maybe locations with a previous history of flooding.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

zichi,

I am not suggesting all rivers in Japan be reinforced from end to end. It's only the man-made embankment that I'm taking issue with here, most of which is just the dirt mounds.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I am not suggesting all rivers in Japan be reinforced from end to end. It's only the man-made embankment that I'm taking issue with here, most of which is just the dirt mounds.

The river which broke its banks in Nagano from the typhoon is the one I mentioned, the Chikuma River, also called the Shinano River (another previous name for Nagano).

You can see from the photo that the bank are not just dirt mounds suggested by you but have rocks and steel netting. In some places concrete is also used.]

I actually lived near the river for about 10 years.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

zichi,

You can see from the photo that the bank are not just dirt mounds suggested by you but have rocks and steel netting. In some places concrete is also used.

As far as I saw on TV footages, collapses occurred only where banks were dirt mounds. If these mounds had been reinforced with piles driven in, damage could have been reduced to the minimum, I’m sure.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If you look at the picture above, you’ll be able to see how banks are made. They are made from dirt and loose piles of rocks.

Even to the untrained eye, they won’t withstand the enormous pressure of flooded and  flowing river water.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The national broadcaster NHK reports, citing the statistics compiled by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, that the damage caused by Typhoon Higibis (Typhoon No. 19) may exceed 70 billion yen.

Under such circumstances, I wonder why the government shouldn't divert a budget appropriated for the construction of the Henoko new base in Nago City, Okinawa, a sheer white elephant, to the reconstruction of typhoon-devastated areas as well as to the improvement of potentially collapsible river banks.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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