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Allure of Japan's powder snow a growing danger as more tourists ski backcountry

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By Mariko Katsumura and Elaine Lies

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There is no legal validity for any of these “signs”. Just like you can climb any mountain any time of the year, you can also ski down from any one of them anytime you want. Just make sure you don’t need help when doing so.

-1 ( +9 / -10 )

Just have a sign pointing out that if you pass here you will be liable for ALL costs involved for your rescue and or recovery.

4 ( +12 / -8 )

"Every day people are ignoring the 'keep out' signs or ducking under the barrier ropes - and almost all of them are non-Asian foreigners," he said. "We tell them 'no skiing' and they say 'we're pros, it's okay'."

Possible solution: Require incoming tourists to register a credit card with a tracking app that warns them about and automatically fines them when they choose to enter restricted areas. Why should residents be forced to foot the bill for the rescue of the noncompliant tourist?

-9 ( +5 / -14 )

There is no legal validity for any of these “signs”. Just like you can climb any mountain any time of the year, you can also ski down from any one of them anytime you want.

In some spot in Japan they put sign which stated for anyone who crossing certain sign will be liable for rescue operation expenses, which is better than costing taxpayer money for their action.

https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/09/warning-and-danger-signs-part-2/

7 ( +10 / -3 )

What pisses me off is the hubris of some of these foreign skiers who think they know better than the people who live and work here. And as the article states it is usually non-Asian foreigners who are the ones who get themselves into trouble. What do other countries do if tourists go back country skiing and get lost or trapped? Japan should do the same.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

and the unwillingness of some visitors to follow safety advice.

Geez seems that this comment should be pointed towards the Japanese skiers who were involved in accident themselves too!

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Some peeps are thrill seekers, but they should know the risks. Earthquakes and volcanoes can displace shelves of snow, avalanches are more frequent, and you might unknowingly ride over a big sleeping bear’s head.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

"Every day people are ignoring the 'keep out' signs or ducking under the barrier ropes - and almost all of them are non-Asian foreigners," he said. "We tell them 'no skiing' and they say 'we're pros, it's okay'."

Fine, then have them sign waivers, and ensure they have insurance that covers any costs associated with any incidents that they may get involved with. Including any recovery efforts that stem from them not following posted rules or warnings.

Another option, change the laws, make it illegal, and arrest them on the spot.

Oh and make damn sure that it goes for Japanese skiers and snow-boarders too!

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

A mandatory insurance system should be required to cover the costs of rescue and recovery if the skier/snowboarder leaves the designated trails and disregards the caution signs.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

There is no national data, but in the popular ski prefecture of Nagano, in all of 2019 some 22 people were involved in accidents in backcountry terrain outside designated resorts, none of them foreign. Last month alone, eight foreigners were involved in accidents in Nagano.

I hope this is a bad translation because bumnping into someone else on a ski slope (an accident - no backcountry mentioned for second line) is totally different to "accients in the backcountry".

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

There is no national data, but in the popular ski prefecture of Nagano, in all of 2019 some 22 people were involved in accidents in backcountry terrain outside designated resorts, none of them foreign. Last month alone, eight foreigners were involved in accidents in Nagano.

So 22 people were Japanese who were injured, the year prior and this year, there are 8 "foreigners" (queue the hysteria).

So it seems Japanese AND tourists are getting involved in accidents. So from this we can concluded that everyone likes to enjoy the back country regardless of religion, race or creed and therefore entirely negates the purpose of this article.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Social Media / Youtube / etc. The more you see the more you want it as well. Its called human nature. Most travel insurance does not cover the cost of back country rescue, so be prepared to pay heavily if you need help. Hats off to those who are willing to risk their own lives to rescue others.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What do other countries do if tourists go back country skiing and get lost or trapped?

Mount a rescue operation. No shortage of them in any given year in the US or Europe.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Back home in the US there are some fellows called Ridge Hippies. They go to predictable avalanche areas and use minor explosives to start the avalanche before the ski areas open.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Accidents happen NO matter what sport you or work you do, the THRILL of living on the edge is what makes it worth the risk, some manage to survive and some don't but that is what's all about.

A classic example of living a life doing what you love and die doing it is Mr. Ken Block #34 (RIP) , he once said "" If you are not scared, then you are not driving fast enough"" many like him give the ultimate for what they love doing daily.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Ultimately everyone is responsible for own safety

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Skiers, police and officials cite a combination of factors: a lack of safety information in English

They are going no matter what language you put warning signs in. They know the risks like certain surfers that go out during typhoon weather.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I once came across a warning sign in Bali near the a Volcano area that said ""Proceed at your own risk"" and I thought it was funny at that time but it is to the point.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

People won't stop searching for the powder, at least people from the west. Always baffles me how even right next to the slopes there is perfectly untouched powder and no Japanese feel the need to go there. But yeah they really need to be held accountable for any type of rescue costs that comes with the risk. Same for any dangerous hiking etc which I assume account for even more death or injuries every year.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Possible solution: Require incoming tourists to register a credit card with a tracking app that warns them about and automatically fines them when they choose to enter restricted areas. 

Wow. Big Brother in action. George Orwell would recongize that system.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

what a histeric sign.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

what a histeric sign.

As opposed to what? The skull and cross bones is universally recognized as a danger warning. Do you suggest some red kanji would be better?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Wow. Big Brother in action. George Orwell would recongize that system.

Are you actually so naive that do realize your current surroundings?

Virtually your every movement is being tracked, and usually you actually choose to carry a tracking device. And oftentimes, you have actually granted the tracker permission to track you.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

And as the article states it is usually non-Asian foreigners who are the ones who get themselves into trouble.

Err, you didn't read the article well or purposely decided to omit the part it says that in 2019, twenty-two were involved in backcountry accidents in Nagano alone, none of them foreigners.

And did you hear that on January 28th a Japanese national resident from Nara got involved in another backcountry accident? Probably not, since the guy was Japanese.

What do other countries do if tourists go back country skiing and get lost or trapped? Japan should do the same.

Other countries have proper rescue protocols, as well a very good avalanche reports. Whenever there's an avalanche, people get into the the avalanche area to check the layers and types of snow involved in the avalanche. There are many different kinds of layers and reasons for an avalanche to happen.

This is just one example: https://utahavalanchecenter.org/forecast/logan

In Japan, the first thing they do is look where to point fingers. Second, that's it. Done. As long as they found where to put the blame on, all is fine.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

As a skier myself, I get the allure of going backcountry to chase the virgin powder, but anyone who does so must take responsibility for the risk and have the proper insurance, or be prepared to foot the bill with their own coin if a rescue or body recovery comes into play.

Personally though, I've never done backcountry skiing and am happy enough exploring within resort bounds. The 20-21 and 21-22 winters were awesome for that, with short lift queues and hardly any people around to make tracks in what was some amazing snow in Hokkaido. At one point last year in Kiroro there was about 5.5m of snow on the ground and thigh-deep powder on the edges of runs after a big dump. No need to go backcountry when there's some of that.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What do the Government agencies want because these people will be willing to do what is take to hit backcountry. I work in the industry and I know what will it take. 1st double or triple the cost of recuse. Place a large image with large printed in English GOING BACKCOUNTRY IT WILL COST YOU IF NEED TO BE RESCUE/BODY RETRIEVAL at first entry point for international visitors. I was ask all the time do know of any entry point into the backcountry and if I did could I drop them of a pickup. I like to say most know the danger and are experts but as like the recent deaths they were well train and know the sign to look for but is not the case. They get over confident and their gold clouded with time restriction and they push beyond the own capabilities limit. When ask, my first reply is mate if you do and get into trouble you be put the rescues people in the same dangers and may cause a death. I wouldn’t want to wear that think about their families that left with no mum or dad because you have a gold and time restricted. Most will take the advice and stick to the patrol tree run which most resort have open up for these people.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The closest I ever came to dying snowboarding was in Japan; twice.

Once we were hucking ourselves off of a cornice at Hachimantai in Iwate. When we were having lunch (and a few more beers) the cornice broke off. It was the size of about two buses tall and 4 buses across. There's no digging someone out from under that. That's a recovery delayed until spring.

The other time I fell headfirst into a tree well at Yamagata Zao (ironically famous for trees covered in snow with windblown wells around the base). I was upside down and nearly invisible. Luckily one of my buddies stopped and extra-luckily I was able to fish my whistle out of my pocket and give it some loud toots. My buddy was able to unstrap my board and get me out.

Now I just snowboard here in New England where conditions basically suck. I'm looking forward to my son getting a little bigger and better at snowboarding so we can do our annual family visits to Tohoku in the winter and bring our boards!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

It’s a dangerous sport-participants beware!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Increase lift prices to cover the cost of the wandering horde. Will that work for you?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

"We were not intentionally marketing backcountry ... as more foreign skiers from countries with a longer history of backcountry came to Japan, they brought this culture with them," sad Hideaki Yoshimi, an official at the tourism authority of Nagano prefecture, in the Japan Alps.

This man is either ignorant of what his own department does or is lying. Kyle Smaine's trip was partially funded by Nagano and Niigata Prefectures. This was reported in the Shinano Mainichi newspaper. If you are funding trips for people to film in the backcountry, you are "intentionally marketing backcountry".

Local Nagano governments have also funded the hosting of the Freeride World Tour to the tune of millions of yen. This is a skiing/snowboarding contest hosted exclusively in the backcountry. I'm pretty sure government money was given to Travis Rice, probably the world's best known snowboarder, to make trips to and film in Japan, again exclusively in the backcountry.

Local governments will be pretty much clueless about international promotion, so its probably self-styled "consultants" telling them what to do. I wouldn't bother spending any money on promoting skiing in Japan to westerners, everyone knows about it already, and would instead spend heavily in Asia. Asian visitors spend much more and happy enough to just to see snow, without making fickle demands about powder or untracked snow.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Meh, if "thrillseekers" are willing to ignore the rules and go as they please, they deserve the consequences.

It's like anything else in life.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japanese ski resorts are outdated compared to those in North America, Europe and Australasia. Outdated hotels, outdated lifts, outdated approach to backcountry skiing. Ski patrols should be triggering danger areas early morning and yes those skiers / snowboarders should have all the correct equipment understand the dangers and be willing to bear the costs of any eventuality. That’s said, Japan offers incredible backcountry potential and should capitalise on this as it’s good for inbound tourism.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

the thrill of finding snow that hasn’t been tracked has amazing power to pull you in.. Post pictures of deaths and warnings in dangerous areas along with info that peeps will bore total financial responsibility if any rescue is needed. Maybe an insurance program that everyone pays into that covers recoveries, etc

1 ( +1 / -0 )

A person I know got lost in the mountains and had to pay $20000 for the helicopter. Skiers should know that

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Snow sports have moved on and many advanced riders are no longer interested in hurtling down ice-bahns at 100 mph in fluorescent spandex outfits. Advanced riders want to ski fresh, untouched powder, natural terrain features and tree runs and most of the time, you don't get that within the resort boundaries. Unfortunately, most ski resorts in Japan haven't changed with the way the sport has changed over time - their attitude is just to enforce complete bans on all out-of-bounds riding to everyone, irrespective of conditions. Banning people from doing the things they enjoy is rarely a good strategy. Other places have managed to accommodate the needs of backcountry riders, including in Japan - Niseko operates a gate and rules system where, when the conditions are less risky, people are allowed to access off-piste terrain via the gates provided they follow some simple rules. There are some areas that are especially prone to avalanche that are closed completely - people generally stick to the rules and know that when the gates are closed, it really is a bad idea to go out there.

As usual, the comments both in the article by the people interviewed and from some of those commenting on it are laden with xenophobic attitudes - there are loads of Japanese that go off-piste and into the backcountry too - also many of them without the appropriate knowledge and equipment, but the Japanese media make a much bigger fuss about it when it's a foreigner that gets into trouble. There have now been several articles on this very site mentioning the foreign skiers killed in Nagano, but I don't recall seeing a single one about the Japanese person killed after an avalanche hit their group in Tanigawa-dake in Gunma while backcountry snowboarding on the very same day. I often go off-piste in lift-accessible terrain (more what we call side-country, than backcountry) along with plenty of others, almost everyone I see out there is Japanese.

As usual, it's always foreigners, foreigners foreigners - article after article about the one incident in which foreigners where involved - the issue is completely and conveniently forgotten about when it involves Japanese.

Here is a brief article I managed to find about the Tankgawa-dake avalanche -

https://english.news.cn/20230129/26846aa1b6974ec89d9698d5b913fb33/c.html

6 ( +7 / -1 )

This is THE biggest lot of garbage ever. The VAST majority of people going under the ropes or out the back are Japanese.....I know because I go out the back and down the sides and sometimes I duck the ropes. This is typical of Japan on a number of issues,

The narrative of good Japanese/ Bad foreigner - just ridiculous.

Japan's "just do what I tell ya" mind set. Skiing and snowboarding is inherently risky and people do risky things everyday. They try to mitigate those risks as much as possible......just telling people not to do it is ridiculously naïve. Japanese resorts are happy to take the money of these people who buy their lift tickets to access these off course runs, more should be done on controlling the back country as much as possible. This isn't new. People in Europe and North America have been skiing off course for decades. The authorities there, whilst reminding people that skiing off course is dangerous and they accept no responsibility after the rider steps beyond the ropes, will still help to manage the back country through avalanche control. When riders know that the authorities do avalanche maintenance, they are more likely to listen when the gate is closed. Niseko is a prime example. Accidents still happen tho.

They are hinting that the dangerous foreign pro-skier that died was at fault....when actually it was Japanese group skiing above them that set off a slope that they weren't even on. The pro-skier and his group had just rode their line, had moved away from the foot of their slope and were preparing to leave from the relative safety of an adjoining slope (where they had saw people doing the same and even a group doing avy beacon training the run before) when the next group of locals came down. There was nothing excessively dangerous that the pro skier had done, they had all the safety equipment, they had dug their snow pits and they had rode the line before....but accidents happen. Most avalanches that kill are human triggered, not foreigner triggered....Japan needs to take responsibility for itself. The "head in the sand" mentality costs lives.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

A person I know got lost in the mountains and had to pay $20000 for the helicopter. Skiers should know that

Skiers and snowboarders DO know that....you think they are thinking that "it's ok, if we get lost we'll just phone a helicopter?!".....LMAO

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Possible solution: Require incoming tourists to register a credit card with a tracking app that warns them about and automatically fines them when they choose to enter restricted areas. Why should residents be forced to foot the bill for the rescue of the noncompliant tourist?

Residents do not foot the bill. Everyone who rides out the gates knows that you pay the rescue costs if they are needed.

Tell me you have no idea about snowsports without saying you have no idea about snowsports.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

What pisses me off is the hubris of some of these foreign skiers who think they know better than the people who live and work here. And as the article states it is usually non-Asian foreigners who are the ones who get themselves into trouble. What do other countries do if tourists go back country skiing and get lost or trapped? Japan should do the same.

They rescue them....

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Most will take the advice and stick to the patrol tree run which most resort have open up for these people.

and it took YEARS for even that....Japan's Oyaji Cartel just said "NO!" (insert crossed arms sign here).

Japan's resort management need to wake up and do what their counterparts in Europe and N. America did 40 years ago and start to manage their local BC.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

The problem is the people are largely unfamiliar with the terrain, and are willing to risk the avalanche snow and weather conditions due to only being in a Japan for a short period of time. As pointed out by others. Those at the top of the runs can accidentally trigger avalanches endangering those below. No matter how accomplished of skier or snowboarder or familiarity with the terrain and conditions, when it wants to nature always wins.

Make more resorts, that have back country feel (ungroomed areas) with an inbounds safety aspect. Some resorts offer these kind of courses.

Not every skier wants to go to the resort to hear K-pop or J-pop blaring. Many people feel a certain calmness in the backcountry and thrill from danger. Until shxt hits the fan.

Having lost close friends to avalanches before, its never an easy subject, but stay safe and live to ride another day.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Thrill seekers should be fined for not following rules. During their trouble resources such as time, equipment and money are used to rescue them. If the rescue mission is successful they should foot the bill! The Japanese taxpayers shouldn’t pay for their arrogance and negligence!

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

How much better was life without tourists?

It's good you don't' like money, social interactoins, an economy, jobs, maybe you can just lock yourself inside and let everyone else live their lives.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Someone mentioned up the lift prices. They have at Appi and for Senior it’s 4100 yen. Also appi don’t do haft days. Well I can tell you I be going else like Geto Kogan. Also any pass through custom and have a snowboard or ski with them should pay 2,000 yen. This money can be pass on to lift operators. Because the local with stop going if they up the lift price.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Going next week for the first time in years. But yeah, wouldn't ever think of going off course.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Guy Gin. Are you for real. For starters, not one ski jo in Australia has a gondala. Plus $150 + a day lift passes. Is that what you call up to date. I have given up on the snow in Australia for the above reasons.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Sheikh: I been reading your comments. Like I said I worked in the industry. yes the locals do backcountry. But they're a big difference. First it rare for them to duck the out of bounds rope. Because They know other will follow their track thinking, well someone duck under here so I am going to give it a go. The majority will walk off from the top lifts leaving only foot print and give off the impression of hikers. So all the local I have known act in this manner. Only conclusion is these Japanese ducking the rope must be young immature locals who been watching YouTuber influencers.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

For those looking to try out riding off course, good idea to take a basic course about the dangers of off-piste riding (there are many more than just avalanche - hitting trees, rocks, hidden streams, tree wells, becoming stranded are just a few), learn how to use beacon, shovel and probe, and about the simple precautions that you can take to reduce the risk. Evergreen offer such courses in English in Hakuba. If you are coming to Japan for a week of skiing or boarding, could be a good idea to book their two-day course for the first couple of days of your trip. Doing something like this would be comparable to doing something like a PADI course for diving.

Kagura is a good resort for getting into skiing out of bounds - there is lots of lift-accessible runs that are not officially part of the resort, but many people go there - avalanches are pretty rare there (it isn't that steep for the most part), although there are a few spots if you hike to the top where slides are more likely.

And all the fuss about the dangers of skiing backcountry - you can also die skiing on course as well:

This from Dec. 2011 - I was at the same resort that day and had a great time skiing the deep snow within the resort boundaries, wondered why they closed this one run and later on I found out this was the reason -

"On the morning of the 26th, a male office worker from Saitama Prefecture was found buried under snow at a ski resort in Yuzawa, and was confirmed dead shortly afterwards.

Police are investigating the case as the man fell over accidentally while snowboarding.

At around 10:50 am on the 26th at the Kandatsu Kogen ski resort in Yuzawa, a ski resort staff member on patrol found a man with his body partially buried in the snow with his snowboard board still attached.

The man was taken to hospital, but was confirmed dead shortly afterwards. Takano was found on the advanced course, which had approximately 1 metre and 80 cm of snow" (Translated from Japanese).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

8 died in a skiing accident in Austria a few days ago. The risk is known, the warning is clear, It's their own lives and own decisions

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Seth M

8 died in a skiing accident in Austria a few days ago. The risk is known, the warning is clear, It's their own lives and own decisions

But others also put their lives at risk. First responders and rescue teams.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Nippon Tora: The evergreen course is just a safe guard and I suggest you use that knowledge accompany with a local guild over a season before heading out alone. Don,t go thinking this evergreen course will skill you up to go out alone after you pass the course. Local terrain is different on all mountains and only accompanying a local expert for a season will educated of the local terrain. What the local guild will bang into you is this is Japan that you maybe an expert but experts don't know when an earthquake or tremor will trigger a fail.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@John-san - agreed - a two day course is only going to give you a few basics and is no substitute for gaining seasons' worth of experience and knowledge of local terrain and conditions that a good local guide would have.

Having said that, a guide probably wouldn't take you out if you didn't have the basic knowledge that you would gain from that two-day course though, such as how to carry out a search with a beacon etc.

Also, having done a basic avalanche safety training course, an individual would probably be less likely to take a chance on that perfect-looking 40 degree slope of untouched fresh powder than someone who had no training at all - I think it's called the Dunning-Kruger effect!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sheikh: I been reading your comments. Like I said I worked in the industry. yes the locals do backcountry. But they're a big difference. First it rare for them to duck the out of bounds rope.

Absolute nonsense! Most people ducking ropes at resorts are Japanese....end of. If you worked in the industry then I suggest you are (were) one of the "head-in-sand" problems of resort management in this country.

Because They know other will follow their track thinking, well someone duck under here so I am going to give it a go.

That is the mentality of every resort rider that rides off the side. People do follow tracks and it is a dangerous game if you don't know the area and terrain......that doesn't stop people doing it.

The majority will walk off from the top lifts leaving only foot print and give off the impression of hikers. So all the local I have known act in this manner.

This is simply not true.

Only conclusion is these Japanese ducking the rope must be young immature locals who been watching YouTuber influencers.

Again you are showing the major problem with resort management (in fact a lot of management :P) in this country, the old guys at the top with the outdated ideas that have no idea what is really going on. Times have changed and ideas have progressed....the dinosaurs at the top of Japanese society need to move on.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

For those looking to try out riding off course, good idea to take a basic course about the dangers of off-piste riding (there are many more than just avalanche - hitting trees, rocks, hidden streams, tree wells, becoming stranded are just a few), learn how to use beacon, shovel and probe, and about the simple precautions that you can take to reduce the risk. Evergreen offer such courses in English in Hakuba. If you are coming to Japan for a week of skiing or boarding, could be a good idea to book their two-day course for the first couple of days of your trip. Doing something like this would be comparable to doing something like a PADI course for diving.

Very good point! Take a course, educate yourself.....try to mitigate the risks as much as you can.

Kagura is a good resort for getting into skiing out of bounds - there is lots of lift-accessible runs that are not officially part of the resort, but many people go there - avalanches are pretty rare there (it isn't that steep for the most part), although there are a few spots if you hike to the top where slides are more likely.

Noooo.....Kagura is no good for these activities. The runs are very short, snow is icy...not an interesting resort at all....best go to Naeba or GALA......Or better yet...Niseko! :P

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Noooo.....Kagura is no good for these activities. The runs are very short, snow is icy...not an interesting resort at all....best go to Naeba or GALA......Or better yet...Niseko! :P

Sure, Kagura has it's limitations - the runs are relatively short and often not so steep. I haven't really encountered much ice there though, apart from when its really windy on exposed parts - I usually only go immediately after or during a snowfall though!

I've also been off at Naeba - fantastic long, steep runs the likes of which you won't find at Kagura, but I'd say it's not for people just getting into it - you need to know what you are doing because those slopes are prone to sliding. You will also have to sneak past the patrols like a naughty school kid because they don't allow off-piste riding at all! Wasn't aware of anything at Gala - a long time since I went there though - maybe one for me to check in the future.

I loved it at Niseko when I went although it was before it really took off - I heard it's quite crowded these days with long lines and everything gets tracked out in no time. The night skiing was amazing when I went.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Niseko, yeah nah

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sheikh: I did say worked and that was 2008 to 2012, and it was a rarity for locals to duck the rope. I recently been boarding for the first time in 4 season, AppiKogan, Hachimantai, and GetoKogan all have patrolled tree run.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Kagura is very bad and not worth anyone going....it's waste of money for sure. :P

Yeah I've been off at Naeba a few times, but I don't know the area so well. GALA has nothing....ummm....read between the lines :O

John-san, most places now have in-bounds tree runs...but they are usually short and get tracked out very quickly. Better for sure on the part of resorts. I was at Appi over new year...good times. Geto looks good with all the in bounds tree runs, they seem to be easy to exit as well....haven't been up there tho.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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