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Asiana suspends Hiroshima flights for safety check

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The accident had echoes of an Asiana flight that crashed in San Francisco in July 2013, killing three people and leaving 182 injured.

The Hiroshima crash is more reminiscent of the Windjet A319 crash at Palermo.

http://avherald.com/h?article=4315b792

A Windjet Airbus A319-100, registration EI-EDM performing flight IV-243 from Rome Fiumicino to Palermo (Italy) with 124 passengers and 6 crew, was performing a VOR approach to Palermo's runway 07 in thunderstorms and windshear at approximately 20:00L (18:00Z). The airplane touched down about 400 meters (1300 feet) short of the runway, impacted the localizer antenna for the ILS runway 25 embedding parts of the antenna in its nose and came to a stop left of the runway in the area of the intersection of runway 07/25 and 02/20 with both main gear struts collapsed, an evacuation via slides was initiated. Three passengers received minor injuries in the evacuation, the airplane received substantial damage.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Uh, I don't think your problem is specific to the Hiroshima route Asiana...

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Only time I flew Asiana they treated me very poorly. That combined with their apparently poor training and lack of safety culture leads me to never want to fly them again.

I've good luck with KAL the few times I've flown them, though.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Ah yes, because it was the airports fault... A airport where hundreds of other planes are able to arrive and depart without any issues every other day. I think that the problem here lays with your pilots/equipment. But of course being a SK carrier I can't but feel that there is a anti Japanese sentiment in this decision.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

It may be the airport's fault, there are many factors involved in setting up an airfield for use by commercial airliners; navigation charts, obstruction lighting, approach patterns...

Suspending the route pending investigation is wise.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

It may be the airport's fault, there are many factors involved in setting up an airfield for use by commercial airliners; navigation charts, obstruction lighting, approach patterns...

And yet, only this ONE flight out of the thousands of flights that have landed at Hiroshima Airport since it opened in 1994 tried to land 300 meters before the runway started. No, there's no way it could be the airport's fault or you would have had this event happen sometime sooner in the last two decades.

The rumored wind shear is certainly a possibility, though you normally only encounter those around a thunderstorm. We won't know for sure until the investigation is completed.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

This same type of aircraft, the Airbus A320 was involved in the same type of crash on 29 March 2015 in Halifax, Canada when Air Canada flight AC624 landed 350 metres short of the runway first cutting through powerlines up on power poles on a street perpendicular to the runway just before completely trashing the ILS array. In that crash, 23 were injured however there was heavy snow and winds gusting to 101Km/h at just after midnight, the time that crash occurred.

This Asiana A320 approach crash sounds more like the Asiana 777 SFO crash based on the weather and visual sight-lines. My question is do pilots at Asiana ever look up from the controls and have a look out front through the windscreen? Clearly ANY GOOD pilot after a few hundred landings will be able to judge during good weather whether they are too low and that altimeter should also be giving you a clue as to the fact as well not to mention the audible cockpit warnings when minimums are reached. Maybe there was a technical glitch and something failed but based on Asian's track record and Korean Pilot's culture, I am placing my bets on human error.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

This Asiana A320 approach crash sounds more like the Asiana 777 SFO crash based on the weather and visual sight-lines. My question is do pilots at Asiana ever look up from the controls and have a look out front through the windscreen? Clearly ANY GOOD pilot after a few hundred landings will be able to judge during good weather whether they are too low and that altimeter should also be giving you a clue as to the fact as well not to mention the audible cockpit warnings when minimums are reached.

From what I've read, this accident occurred at night and in rain, so it doesn't parallel the SFO crash that well. If they were flying in IMC, then all they HAD to go by was the cockpit instruments.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Woo! There's common sense and decent debate here. I expected to be shot down in flames for not criticising Asiana instantly.

I'm an Air Traffic Control Engineer by the way, I know a little about aviation. :D

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I have flown with Asiana & experienced some unusual things such as a nearly zero gravity "bouncing" sensation not created by thermals but likely someone playing around with the ailerons & elevators for 30 minutes while passengers were asleep. Also, a bone jarring steep 3 point landing at 3am in the morning in Korea.Customer service was actually very good at LAX ,though, I was overcharged by an xtra two thousand dollars on my cc & demanded a refund.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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