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Book containing Charlie Hebdo cartoons of Muhammad goes on sale

92 Comments

A book featuring Charlie Hebdo satirical cartoons of Islam prophet Muhammad went on sale in Tokyo on Tuesday despite opposition from Muslim groups in Japan.

The 64-page book, published by Tokyo-based Daisan Shokan, contains 48 satirical cartoons formerly published in the French magazine Charlie Hebdo, which was the target of a murderous attack in Paris last month that left 12 of its editorial staff dead.

The book titled "Islam Heito Ka, Fushi Ka” (Anti-Islam Hate, or Satire?), is published by Daisan Shokan. It features 48 cartoons along with comments by cartoonists and researchers of Islam, TBS reported Wednesday. The face of Muhammad is blurred in the photos.

According to Daisan Shokan, 3,000 copies have been printed and will be distributed to 500 bookstores across Japan, though it is unclear how many stores will actually put it on sale.

Following the announcement of the book's publication, Islamic groups throughout Japan spoke up in protest against the book saying "To print a book with depictions of Muhammad's, blurred or not, is a direct affront to the religious beliefs of Islam." They said freedom of expression should not be used as a reason for insulting one's religious beliefs.

Daisan Shokan said its intention in publishing the book was to spark a discussion about free expression, and the importance and meaning of satire in the modern age.

Riot police have been deployed outside the Daisan Shokan offices in Shinjuku for the protection of its employees.

© Japan Today

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92 Comments
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Why do this, except for the obvious publicity? I can see if they were doing it anyway, and wanted to continue doing it in show of support and their stance against what happened in France, but to start it up AFTER what happened in a nation that largely doesn't understand what happened (clear through the "I am Goto/Kenji" 'movement', etc.) makes very little sense.

-6 ( +12 / -19 )

Next stop, satirical cartoons of the Imperial family and Abe. No, on the other hand...

16 ( +24 / -8 )

Daisan Shokan is taking a big risk by showing freedom of expression. Bet the staff is hunkering down even though Japan is a safe place. But ISIS has vowed vengeance on Japanese for what the Prime Minister did during his recent tour through the Middle East ... so this might make matters worse.

What a mess ...

5 ( +14 / -9 )

Daisan Shokan-interesting publisher-supports France publishing perspectives?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

More power to them, freedom of speech .

Muslims don't like it don't read the book.

24 ( +37 / -13 )

"Daisan Shokan said its intention in publishing the book was to spark a discussion about free expression, and the importance and meaning of satire in the modern age."

As Pukey said, then why pick on Islam. Wanna have that debate, then let's see images of Abe sodomizing the emperor. Don't insult one of the most marginalized races in Japan, one that has caused no trouble here.

-17 ( +9 / -27 )

Is JP going against the rest of the world or only the neighbors. Do you have a religion or only' a get used to'

Please....

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Oh boo-hoo. If Christians can take the mick out of Jesus, etc, then why can't Muslims? Why are they so thin-skinned?

21 ( +32 / -11 )

Freedom of expression is so important that has to be protected even when it offends somebody. We must never force or threaten people in order to make them respect something or someone. Respect has to come from within a person, respect must not be pounded into a person's mind.

What kind of people would want to scare you into respecting them ?...Good people ?

9 ( +15 / -6 )

Book containing Charlie Hebdo cartoons of Muhammad goes on sale

Time to go on a buying spree!

If your religious beliefs are so weak that you are offended by what someone says or does against your religion, well you best check what you belief of your religion at the door before go out into the real world!

If you can't take criticism about your beliefs how can you ever try and promote it!

I find it outrageous that members of ISIS or other crazy groups could ever actually believe they could ever actually ever recruit someone who wasn't completely insane to join up with their insane cause!

21 ( +28 / -7 )

Hey where can I buy it? Anyways, why do Islamists get so offended...You should see some of the Jesus Christ jokes, even using the "F" word...

4 ( +12 / -8 )

"The face of Muhammad is blurred in the photos."

This as-yet uncommented on fact shows how muddle-headed Japanese still are about this debate. The fact that they have intentionally bowed to Muslims by blurring the face instead of publishing the photos AS THE ARTISTS CLEARLY INTENDED shows the publishers are self-censoring what is perfectly OK to be seen and drawn by non-Muslims and thereby offending those in favor of not allowing another person's religion dictate one's own free speech!

But on the other hand, the very fact that they still published the pictures will cause international condemnation from Muslim extremists regardless of the blurry images! So in more than one way, they manage to offend both sides while satisfying absolutely no one. That's some hat trick!

By the way @ jcapan, I hope you know that Islam is not a race...

13 ( +18 / -5 )

That this is even news shows how down the road to submission under islamic blasphemy laws we have already travelled. Cartoons about a historical figure should not even be an issue in a free society.

"The moment you declare a set of ideas to be immune from criticism, satire, derision, or contempt, freedom of thought becomes impossible." (Salman Rushdie)

6 ( +9 / -3 )

"By the way @ jcapan, I hope you know that Islam is not a race..."

"groups"!

Must glance at my own comments before hitting submit. Or JT could offer us an edit button.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

This is about the only time Ild welcome the nationalists in their black vans, and the whole ware ware nihonjin attitude. I hope Japan fights back as a society against the cancer of radical Islam.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Japan will take trouble with such a book publishing.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

It always seems that's muslims are complaining about something, or else being offended about something.

They should lighten up a bit.

And muslims always seem to think that people have to adapt to their needs.

Why can't they adapt?

We have a culture of satire and free speech, where almost anything can be a target for a satire.

If they don't like that culture, why did they come to settle in countries which are so alien to their beliefs?

If they are going to keep on complaining, perhaps they should consider heading to Saudi Arabia which may have a much more agreeable atmosphere for them.

7 ( +13 / -6 )

Non-Muslims can draw pictures of whatever they like. End of story. This whole thing is as stupid as a Jewish person or Muslim person telling Christians or atheists or other non-followers that we could be killed for eating pork. Religions can make rules for their own followers, not for those who don't follow their religion.

20 ( +22 / -2 )

It always seems that's muslims are complaining about something, or else being offended about something.

Judging by the fact that most posters on this site are not Muslims, it would seem it's not just Muslims who are complaining and being offended by something.

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

It's interesting that they blurred the face of the prophet. What good did that do? About as effective as the blurred genitals in Japanese porn. If you're going to be explicit, be explicit, otherwise...

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Nope, no problems here. In fact I might buy the book too just to amuse myself. If it doesn't cost too much...

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I am going to sell my Lexus IS as I might be misunderstood.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Great timing! Freedom of expression vs. insulting other religions? Let me guess, some people will be so angry that this book etc..will be burned and I hope I am wrong, so extremists will go and attack the Japanese who made this book, or the French who made the original and it will only make matters worse. I hope I am wrong, but it would NOT be the first time. About 20 years ago, a Japanese university professor was stabbed to death here in Japan by a very angry Iranian for translating a book into Japanese. I think the book was written by Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie, the book that got him into trouble was called, The Satanic Verses, if I am not mistaken. I can not remember the name of the Japanese professor who translated this book into Japanese but he was stabbed to death.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Wasn't a stir caused in Japan about French cartoons depicting radiation victims? Many French told the Japanese to lighten up, but it did not work. Funny how media can be like a seesaw.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Print or distribute the images unblurred. Anything less is cowering to the medieval brutes hiding behind the veil of islam. Parody muhammed on an hourly basis along with any other sacred freaking cow.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@StormR

No freedom without responsibility, is what I say. I wouldn't insult you and so I expect you wouldn't insult me. Total freedom of speech would be ugly, if we think about it.

@Thunderbird2

Real Christians would never belittle someone, especially the man they purport to revere. Don't know if there are 'fake' Christians, but I'm sure my point is valid.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Islamic groups throughout Japan spoke up in protest against the book saying - To print a book with depictions of Muhammads, blurred or not, is a direct affront to the religious beliefs of Islam. - They said freedom of expression should not be used as a reason for insulting ones religious beliefs.

OK, if this book was published in the Middle East, or by a Pakistani company (for example), then I might agree with the quote above. However, last time I checked Japan wasn't an Islamic country and I'm quietly confident that Daisan Shokan isn't an Islamic company. Nobody has broken any 'rules' here. The Islamic groups that choose to live (continue living) in Japan need to understand that the rest of us 'non-believers' don't have to live by their 'rules' and belief systems.

I know this kind of comment is often seen as being overly harsh, but I believe it's important. It's about time people stood up to these protests by saying quite firmly 'No'. Muslims don't have any more right to be offended than the rest of us.

How often do we hear of non-muslims protesting about how Islamic preachers teach that Allah condemns all non-Muslims to Hell - how hateful is that? How about how the Quran refers to all non-believers as animals, beasts, cattle, and panting dogs? How dare their holy book say that Muhammad believed rats to be "mutated Jews".

About 19% of the Quran is devoted to the violent conquest and subjugation of non-Muslims. Referring specifically to non-believers, one particular verse reads: 'Fight them, Allah will punish them by your hands and bring them to disgrace' (9:14).

I could go on, but I won't. This is all hateful stuff, but we all pretty much ignore it, accept that people have a right to believe it, and get on with our lives.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

“To print a book with depictions of Muhammad’s, blurred or not, is a direct affront to the religious beliefs of Islam.”

Three quick points:

It isn't a depiction of Muhammad. It is a drawing of some vaguely Arabic looking cartoon man. It looks about as much like Muhammad as Mickey Mouse looks like a real mouse.Therefore this is an idiotic argument.

The intent is to comment on Islam in general, even if only a tiny percentage of Muslims are involved. When the pedophilia scandal rocked the Catholic church nobody called foul (especially not the Muslims) when some magazines ran cartoons of Christ on the cross with the words, "Jesus wept" underneath.

The printing of cartoons of Muhammad is NOT an affront to the religion of Islam. The simple acid test here is to check how many protests the Muslims have launched about "The Creation of Adam" (for those who don't know the name, that's the painting in the Sistine Chapel of God reaching down to touch the finger of Adam), or reprints of this picture, or galleries showing copies of this picture.
3 ( +6 / -3 )

I'm on the fence with this one. On one hand, it's most definitely freedom of speech. On the other, why antagonize Muslims for no apparent purpose other than what seems to be to antagonize Muslims.

I don't see how it improves things for people to draw antagonistic pictures of Mohammad. Sure we have the right, but what good comes of antagonizing a group who are obviously offended by it? Why not focus that same effort on criticizing their treatment of women and/or gays, or their rules about not being able to leave the religion. These efforts may actually cause some good. As far as I can tell, drawing pictures of Mohammad doesn't.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

'They said freedom of expression should not be used as a reason for insulting one’s religious beliefs'

They are your beliefs. You chose them. Some find them commendable, some find them ridiculous and some find them dangerous. It's like my political beliefs which are often criticized and ridiculed. I accept that and defend them and enjoy the debate because it makes me think deeper. That's how it works. Cringing into a ball bleating on about hurt feelings isn't how it works. What are people who want to shut down criticism so afraid of?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Hello, Please allow me to give my opinion as a muslim not living in Japan but obviously interested in the japanese culture. I am paraphrasing what i am reading :"freedom of speech", "if muslims are offended, it is their problem", "they should adapt to our way". As a muslim, when i hear about caricatures of our beloved prophet, i feel sad. I feel the same way as a person who is mocked or making fun of freely, without any reasons. What is the goal of that? We know that less educated muslims will get angry, and may end rioting / protesting with eventually a couple of casualties. So is it worth it? You have exercised your freedom of speech but on the other hand you have made fun of a whole group of people. To finish, i would like to remind about what happened in France shortly after the fukushima accident. A famous muppet show played a japanese guy with 3 eyes and a japanese flag with the radioactive sign in the middle. Japan via its embassy in Paris launched a formal complaint to France quoting that it was offensive. Well sorry, that was freedom of speech... Personally i did find that joke very bad and it did not make me laugh.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

“To print a book with depictions of Muhammad’s, blurred or not, is a direct affront to the religious beliefs of Islam.” They said freedom of expression should not be used as a reason for insulting one’s religious beliefs.

As others have said DONT READ IT or look at it!

That said I think its a bit funny this book(which I have NO interest in looking up, boring, who cares) coming out in Japan, a country in DIRE need & absolutely RIPE for SATIRE! But doesn't have any!

And as an astute poster above pointed out Japan got severely bend out of shape when I think some French made some satirical cartoons about Fukushima............

Lets face it Japanese, a great many would be very unhappy if some good ole satire about the imperial family or j-govt came out, a large amount of the J-population would be as pissed as a lot of muslims get over some cartoons truth be told, now I would LOVE to see some good satire here in Japan but the locals wont step up!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

We know that less educated muslims will get angry, and may end rioting / protesting with eventually a couple of casualties. So is it worth it? You have exercised your freedom of speech but on the other hand you have made fun of a whole group of people.

They made fun of themselves by taking the bait. It is worth it to expose people's irrationality? I think it is.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

smithinjapan clearly summed this all up perfectly from the git-go! . . . Why re-kindle the flames (here in Japan) while the Japanese dont even grasp the significance whole charlie hebdo incident in the first place?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Protect Japan

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It may be wrong to publically satirize a religion. But those who are against it can follow legal means to stop it in a civilized manner. Shooting multiple unarmed unsuspecting people for it is neither approriate nor civilized. The Japanese being neither a Muslim nation nor a Western "Crusader" are in a positon to objectively look at this book and reach conclusions. The Muslim position that no one should even be allowed to do that is wrong. As for comments about "how about satirical cartoons of the Imperial Family" I suggest hese posters do a little historical examination. Satirical cartoons riduculing the Japanese people and the Emperor appeared in Eurpoean newspapers from the mid 1800s onwards, some depecting Japanese people as monkeys trying to dress up as "white folk". No acts of violent repisals against the newspapers were ever recorded despite the obvious offensive racism that woud be completely unacceptable today. So I'm sorry if these sartirical cartoons offend the Islamic religion. There are ways to stop it. Killing is not one of them.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

'We know that less educated muslims will get angry, and may end rioting / protesting with eventually a couple of casualties. So is it worth it? You have exercised your freedom of speech but on the other hand you have made fun of a whole group of people'

With all due respect, I don't think 'a couple of casualties' does justice to the number of innocent people brutally slaughtered after a disobliging cartoon, novel or comment. I find criticizing ideas worth it, and let's not fool ourselves by saying certain Muslims are only motivated by crude caricatures of Mohammed to commit murders - a novel or simple comment can do it. As I posted earlier, having your ideas criticized should be welcomed by anyone with an open mind who wants to think and learn more. Any theologian worth the name should agree with this.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Yeah, freedom of speech and all, but does anyone dare say it now... it is really juvenile, not all that funny, and not all that interesting. It never was. No, we have to wait a while before we can say that again... it's still too soon...one shouldn't die for being inane.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I'm not going to buy it. Just look on Google images for the uncensored versions if you're really interested. I don't care if muslims find it offensive for non-muslims to laugh at their stupid religion in non-Islamic countries. They need to stop getting offended or stick to nasty little holes like Saudi Arabia where old blokes with beards will make sure women can't drive or speak for themselves. Or they can return to charming little countries like Iran, where they execute homosexuals for the terrible crime of love. But I'm still not getting on this bandwagon by Daisan Shokan, who had no interest in this until they decided it was a good way of getting some cheap publicity. If they're going to print the images, blurring the faces is plain daft and shows they have no understanding of this issue at all.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Just because you can do something, doesn't mean you should. Be the "bigger man" respect the Islamic religion and don't print the comics. Besides, what is actually gained from printing these images?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

They are now trying to tell Japan what to do. Europe and North America wasn't enought now they need to do it in Japan too.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Wontond, what do you personally lose if they print and I see an image of muhammed?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

The other question of course, is what do you gain?

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

@change. Is that a good enough reason for you to offend millions of people? Because it costs you nothing? I lose nothing, but as a civilized society, we've lost our compassion to respect another religion. People here are behaving like a bunch of children. They tell you not to do something and it makes you want to do it even more. At the end of the day, you still have freedom of expression, but you can choose not to exercise it. It just seems pointless to me.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

To finish, i would like to remind about what happened in France shortly after the fukushima accident. A famous muppet show played a japanese guy with 3 eyes and a japanese flag with the radioactive sign in the middle. Japan via its embassy in Paris launched a formal complaint to France quoting that it was offensive.

Yes, they did. They complained to France that it was offensive. Don't recall many Japanese running around detonating suicide bombs, murdering the people behind it and other innocents and going on the rampage shedding blood indiscriminately though. Of course, correct me if I'm wrong.

No problem with muslims at all. Lovely people. DO have a problem with murderers.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

What we lose of not having such a cartoons in Japan up till now? Well, we lose the insecurity, we lose the non-involvement of Japan in bullying other nations and religions.

I personally will "gain" insecurity after this edition. Yes - we shouldn't care, we shouldn't bend under, we are free to speak, but there are radical Islamists here and there and from now on Japanese will be a target...

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

'At the end of the day, you still have freedom of expression, but you can choose not to exercise it. It just seems pointless to me.'

You have missed one important point. The reason why the vast majority of media outlets have either not published these cartoons or pixelated them is because of the very real fear of being murdered. This is the real reason. Would you be okay with the media 'choosing' not to criticise or satirise for example, neo-Nazis, after they carried out a Charlie Hebdo style massacre? I'm certainly not comparing Islam to Nazism here but perhaps it's worth pointing out that media outlets seem to think they have more to fear from murderous Islamic fanatics than neo-Nazis at the moment. I don't want to live in a society where the threat of or actual murder decides what can be printed.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Now I could see it being punishable if a Muslim drew up pictures and published or gave them out... but why should a non-muslim be held accountable? In fact... from what I've read the Quran does not explicitly forbid images of Muhammad, but there are some supplemental teachings which have prohibited Muslims from creating visual depictions. I think some of these stricter Muslims need to come to grips that they cannot prevent non-muslims from exercising their freedom of expression.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Looks like a book to get before it is taken out of stores like the "Gaijin Crime File" that lasted a day. Smells like something to sell on auction too but I slightly worry about security.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I think the reason for this is a soft retaliation against the murders ISIS committed. We shock mock ISIS not prophet Muhammed who came to abolish ISIS-like mindset.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

At least someone in Japan has some stones to publish this book.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

It's time to show respect to Muslims. I don't understand why they can't respect what people believe.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

Yes, they did. They complained to France that it was offensive. Don't recall many Japanese running around detonating suicide bombs, murdering the people behind it and other innocents and going on the rampage shedding blood indiscriminately though. Of course, correct me if I'm wrong.

No problem with muslims at all. Lovely people. DO have a problem with murderers.

Dont recall many muslims doing so as well. There are people claiming to be muslims but in fact not. I would say they are equally muslims as KKK or Hitler would be Christians... In this case, lets mock and caricature those isis murderers. I, myself, despise them for what they are doing and promoting and i would be the first one to throw stone at them.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Given the current situation worldwide with all the Islamic terrorists killing innocent people, I would say that Daisan Shokan is taking a risk. Hope the Tokyo police have better security for Daisan Shokan's building and staff than the security cops in Paris that got killed.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

They have every right to publish what is considered a legal freedom of speech and not bow down to intomidation or violence threats.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Freedom has cost. Muslims, for most of them, are as Christians as I am. So they accept disbeliefs. Lose ground to fanatics, and those islamists will for next step ask you not to eat pork. That is happening in europe, it is reality. Japanese will be less expressing acceptance to this stance then... Law must be any above religion and any cultural habit for the sake of all and human rights.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

LOL! Surprise, surprise, my free speech was censored. I guess I should have made a disparaging remark about Muslims--that would have kept my comment free from moderator's hatchet.

Moderator: Japan Today does not practice censorship. We do, however, enforce the rules of moderation. That takes priority, not your concept of free speech.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

amazon on standby... cant wait to receive it!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@wontond - RE: Civilized society and respecting other religions - You clearly know very little about the teachings of the Quran!

Regarding your point 'They tell you not to do something and it makes you want to do it even more':

Is this the culture Islam wants us to have in relation to it - one of preemptive submission and cowering backed by the fear of force? Do these people want to live in an open multicultural society because that isnt multiculturalism - in fact its the absolute opposite of what a multicultural system would be like.

Taking offense over a cartoon, and going to the lengths of protesting, is largely pointless in my opinion when you consider that as non-believers we are all destined for hell anyway.

@raf RE 'Lets mock and caricature those ISIS murderers' - The cartoons were designed to satirize and ridicule the fundamentalists who use their religion as an excuse to commit violent acts - so you have completely missed the point of them!

2 ( +5 / -3 )

A quick Google image search of "jesus hebdo" will bring cartoons to offend every faith. They are juvenile, as I said... something you would expect from an eighth grader wanting to thumb his nose at authority, but I haven't noticed any Christian, Jewish, or Buddhist hit squads out to kill cartoonists. Of course, maybe they're just slacking off.

In any case, I suppose they will eventually publish a book of cartoons to offend each religion, and I'm sure something can be developed for atheists. That way, we can have a fine selection for our coffee tables.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

im with strangerland on this. while I agree with freedom of expression, why put oil on fire. Like I said before. Japan didnt have anything to do with the islam before, now its making a target of itself more and more each day.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

It's offensive that religious extremists are allowed to demand special treatment (backed by threats of violence). Even if the cartoons are derogatory toward a religion, they are an expression of opinion. Don't cow to those who would impose sharia on everyone.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I am totally against this book. Respecting neighboors is the basic rule if one wants to live a a peaceful life. Is it my imagination that only Europeans and some Jewish-Americans are supporting this kind of provocation deliberately? Most people I know think that what happened to Hebdo was wrong, but so was the cartoons it published.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Is it my imagination that only Europeans and some Jewish-Americans are supporting this kind of provocation deliberately?

Yes, it is your imagination.

Daisan Shokan said its intention in publishing the book was to spark a discussion about free expression, and the importance and meaning of satire in the modern age.

Daisan Shokan is a Japanese publisher.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The Islamic group's protest on TV contained a threat: "Japan has no right to hurt other people's feelings, I'm worried that some incident might happen" This is alarming because I think it's the first time inside Japan that they have threatened Japan on TV.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@HollisBrown I think you missed my point, but the civilized society I was referring to was our own. I know no matter what I say, I'm not going to change your mind, just like no matter how many images of the Prophet Muhammed are printed, it's not going to change the mind of Islamic fundamentalists. The warning signs are out there. The publishers of this book can ignore them, but don't be shocked if something terrible happens as a result. I'm not saying it's right, and I'm not saying it's warranted, but if an attack does happen, they need to ask themselves if it was worth it? These people who are carrying out these attacks don't care if they die. They think they're going to paradise where 72 virgins await them. Why give them the opportunity to martyr themselves?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I don't think people have a right to not be offended. If a picture of Mohammed exists somewhere that isn't a good reason to riot and kill people. Don't look at it or think about it if it upsets you so much.

The outrage at images of Mohammed appears to be a recent development and not one with any basis in Islam. It is stirred up by those with an agenda to stifle any criticism of that religion, no matter how slight.

Note that muslims raise no objections to the caricatures of Jews which are published in mass media throughout the middle east. They don't mind causing offence to others.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

christians break the 10 commandments all the time, but you don't see them threatening a holy war. which is more important, spreading a message of love and peace or whingeing when someone draws a picture of your prophet? as god stated, turn the other cheek.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

It isn't a depiction of Muhammad. It is a drawing of some vaguely Arabic looking cartoon man. It looks about as much like Muhammad as Mickey Mouse looks like a real mouse.Therefore this is an idiotic argument.

A couple of points:

There is nothing in the Quran that specifically forbids depicting Muhammad.

There is no authentic visual tradition of Muhammad. So, what Muhammad looked like is up to the individual's interpretation.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

What has "respect muslims" has to do with Caricature book , they dont need to look at it if they dont like, their claim to depictions not allowed can and should be only followed by people that practice Islam and absolutely nobody else. on that same note, they themselves have absolutely no issues depicting other religions badly.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Blurring his face? Why not blur Viking man in Anpanman cartoons? He is as evil as Mohammad.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@wontond The debate is long past whether its right or not for non-Muslims to print such cartoons. I can see both sides of the argument with regards that. In our 'civilized societies' (UK, Holland, Denmark, France, Japan etc), we have laws that protect people from slander, hate crimes etc. and punishments for those who break them. We don't need these groups dishing out their own punishments and deterrents.

The debate is now whether its acceptable for these Islamic groups to react in the way they do, claim offense even when living within non-Muslim societies, and demand that non-Muslim groups actually adhere to their Muslim belief system and as such have their non-Muslim beliefs suppressed.

The irony here is that traditional Islamic law says that Muslims who live in non-Muslim societies must obey the law of the majority. Maybe the minority need reminding of this.

I'm very willing to follow Islamic rules if I'm in an Islamic society, that goes without saying. However look at the history: Salman Rushdie in the UK, Theo Van Gogh in Holland, the Danish cartoons, Charlie Hebdo in Paris - there are probably more examples that slip my mind at the present time. The main argument against publishing such materials now is simply fear of violent reprisals. That, I contest, is wrong.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Is it my imagination that only Europeans and some Jewish-Americans are supporting this kind of provocation deliberately?

A lot of Europeans are Christian, and the cartoons insult Jesus, God, and the Pope. Many U.S. fundamentalist Christians have spoken out against the lack of respect that is shown. The cartoons also insult Moses, and have lots of stereotypical racist caricatures of Jews, so I really doubt that there is much support from that group either.

What has united people of every and no faith is that almost nobody, from any religion, even though they hate the stupid cartoons, approves of murdering someone for drawing them.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

ISIS are not real Muslims. Get your facts right. Real Muslims don't kill for this, they just get really offended.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

What a joke, it is seriously time to start classifying religion as a mental condition rather than anything else. Humanity would be a few thousands years more advanced without it TBH. By far the biggest waste of time and energy humans have ever committed, besides the art I guess

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A 600-year-old mindset vs. the modern freedoms enlightened people have fought tooth-and-nail for over the last 600 years.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

That is the problem! I read through comments. I do not agree that only fundamentalists will get offended by those cartoons. as a muslim, i do not like other to mock me, islamic symbols and my religion as a whole. actually, i do not blame the cartoons itself. It is just a cartoon. You could have added a legend saying that this cartoon depicts an isis terrorist: we wont be here debating over it. It is more the gesture of mockery and aiming a whole group. The intention of ridiculing a community. if christians, buddhist do not make a fuss about mockery of their beliefs, that this their problem. This newspaper has choosen this path. You guys should at least respect and give the right to the muslim community in Japan to be not happy and express their disagreement. however, that is not justifying violence.... you unfortunately have people with a brain as big as a cheek pea in every community... bottom line, am confident that japanese people are educated not to fall on easy mockery like other countries (France) where being anti islamic is actually promoted by the people in charge...

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

raf-_-

" if christians, buddhist do not make a fuss about mockery of their beliefs, that this their problem. "

No, it is not a "problem", it is called modernity and civility. If someone feels offended in a modern society, he can protest, but ina peaceful way. You want everybody to settle their disputes with death threats and firebombs? That is NOT an example to follow. The majority of us does not want European cities to turn into something like the Lebanese civil war or Mogadishu.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

WilliB please read my message, maybe am not clear enough. why do you split into binary mode? Modern muslims = dont feel offended, archaic muslim=feel offended=put bombs. am just saying that we should be given the right to disapprove that mockery act. Am not advocating killing people for a cartoon, no muslim would do that. Following your logic, if i create a photoshop of a porc sodomizing one of your relative, would you call that modernity or civility? dont confuse and dont put at same level what is happening in lebanon or somalia... it has nothing to do with islam. The shortcuts that you are taking are dangerous and leading to fear.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

<>Alex Einz-What has "respect muslims" has to do with Caricature book , they dont need to look at it if they dont like, their claim to depictions not allowed can and should be only followed by people that practice Islam and absolutely nobody else.

For me, of course they dont like it and they dont need to look at it. But, the prophet is what they believe in and show loves to Him, it is like Jesus(please be upon Him) for Christian. While I cannot see or found (maybe i was wrong,but prove me that I am wrong) any cartoon that provoke Jesus. If there is, why people dont complain about it?because they dont have faith in it?

And by the way Alex, please show some fact that you quote as below. <>on that same note, they themselves have absolutely no issues depicting other religions badly.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

A book featuring Charlie Hebdo satirical cartoons of Islam prophet Muhammad went on sale in Tokyo on Tuesday despite opposition from Muslim groups in Japan.

Is this some kind of ill-chosen response to the murder of the 2 hostages? It makes me wonder

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

HEY BOGVA , you want to tell us where these muslim extreamest live here in Japan since you like to talk like you know so much!? I'm not muslim and I don't support anyone making fun of anyone. I wouldn't be surprised if Japan had some type of attack by these people like jihadi john who supposedly did haruna and goto in , it's disrespectful to do anything someone dosen't want. Abe made big news saying japan will offer non military support to the wars just after the beheadings then this magazine thing? Oh boy this spells trouble

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

It is very important that the Japan government and people protect freedom of expression and the so called "Right to Offend".

In a modern civilized world, people who take offense have the right to choose to avoid whatever it is that offends them.

Back in India, Muslims prevented Salman Rushdie from appearing even via video conference at the Jaipur Literary Festival.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2012/jan/26/salman-rushdie-jaipur-literary-festival

Even in one of the most developed states in India, Muslim religious leaders asked for reduction in the legal age of marriage of girls, which was fortunately rejected by a moderate progressive Muslim forum, and also the state government.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/kozhikode/kerala-muslim-forum-rejects-move-to-lower-age-of-marriage/article5165225.ece

Japan can only do well if tightly controlling Muslim immigration and doing strict background checks when issuing temporary visas - otherwise an increase in the % of the resident Muslim population may lead to serious issues (like described in the link below).

http://qr.ae/BetdY

4 ( +5 / -1 )

raf_:

" if i create a photoshop of a porc sodomizing one of your relative, would you call that modernity or civility? "

That is beside the point. If you cartoon living persons like me or my relative, you have to deal with possible libel laws. That does not apply fictional or historical figures. If you ask for special priviliges for one particular ideology, that is the end of freedom of speech.

" dont confuse and dont put at same level what is happening in lebanon or somalia... it has nothing to do with islam. "

It has everything to do with islam.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

How can anyone be offended when there is no one alive who knows what the prophet looked like. Most of the characterisations I have seen look more like Osama Bin Ladin.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"Real Muslims don't kill for this...."

Then how come senior clergy members in the past have handed down fatwas to the likes of Salmon Rushdie and other cartoonists in recent years?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Masri, look your self, there are loads of caricatures of jews and christians in muslim press there also loads of caricatures of jesus, and people laugh at him every single day. that should not bother muslim to a point where they start riot or kill people. not everyone believes in imaginary deities

2 ( +3 / -1 )

i know what i'm buying first thing on my next trip. it's funny how in some instances japan honors freedom of speech more than other certain countries. in some instances.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

In March last year, the Supreme Court upheld lower court rulings ordering Daisan Shokan to pay ¥35.2 million in damages to 16 Muslims living in Japan after it published a book based on leaked police documents linking the plaintiffs with terrorism.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"Real Muslims don't kill for this...." Tell that to the bunch of people that were killed in the recent years

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Funny how depicting the face of Mohammed is "offensive" idolatry, but taking his name in vain and acting as if they ARE Mohammed by killing people is somehow okay with them. I would say Muslims are the biggest idolators (and therefore blasphemers) on the face of the earth because they presume to act on his behalf.

Fine. No pictures of Mohammed...But I don't hear anything against creating depictions of Allah, so I guess those are fair game, huh? Yes!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

ISIS is a peace of crap. They don't dare try to do anything in Japan, else they are gonna ask for something they won't be able to handle.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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