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Buildings constructed in Manchukuo by occupying Japanese forces get official protection from Beijing

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© 2013 AFP

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This is a progressive move. Too bad the morons in Tokyo who decided to destroy the last remaining Dojunkai and allowed high-end brand stores to dominate once historic Omotesando don't have the same mindset.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

How is the Chinese government wanting to preserve old structures to maintain hatred and nationalism in any way "progressive" or comparable in any way to the Dojunkai apartments?

1 ( +8 / -7 )

“If it’s invaded, enslaved and bullied by others, it should not hide that history but should demonstrate it to the world and let its descendants remember that forever.”

Tibet?

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Just as the Poles have kept Nazi-built concentration camps intact to educate future generations, this is a good move. Learning from textbooks can only paint part of the picture. Glad those Chinese netizens were ignored.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

I have been to that area before and my friend pointed out a couple of buildings built during that era. Bustling town but it gets cold as heck in the winter.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Yes, good to preserve history. Unfortunately it's not always respected the way it should be.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

“If it’s invaded, enslaved and bullied by others, it should not hide that history but should demonstrate it to the world and let its descendants remember that forever.”

Three thoughts on this quote.

1.) Japan committed horrible acts during WWII. This cannot be denied.

2.) I believe China uses "progressive" acts to deter attention away from the Chinese government's bullying of it's own citizens. Persons interested in reading an excellent example of how insulated from law and order the Chinese government is should read "A Chinese search for justice" from the Saturday, May 11th edition of the Japan Times.

3.) I believe China uses "progressive" acts to deter attention away from the Chinese government's bullying of it's neighboring countries (as already pointed about by Harry Gatto).

3 ( +4 / -1 )

“A nation should face the tough years in its history,” Zhou Zueyang, a history professor from Nanjing University told the Global Times newspaper.

Can anyone say "cultural revolution"?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Shenyang....9-1-8 Museum....not to be missed for accurate picture.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

LOL... and what about their government's massacre on its own people? why are they hiding it?

0 ( +6 / -6 )

They are preserved because they are well-built, not for some historical reason.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

LOL... and what about their government's massacre on its own people? why are they hiding it?

The communist dictator gov't have never issued a formal apology for the estimates 50-100 million Chinese killed by Chairman Mao and who's own granddaughter has now amassed a fortune of more than $500 million and is on the rich list?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

@Zichi,

You omitted the fact that Mao's granddaughter is married to Chen, who happens to own an insurance company, an auction house and a courier firm. You can't possibly be suggesting that this wealth was built and owned by Kong herself, can you?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

@Alejandro,

'Massacre' is too emotive a word to describe the Cultural revolution. Also, I highly doubt the Chinese government could hide the fact that such a revolutionary event had occurred during the PRC's short history.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Massacre' is too emotive a word to describe the Cultural revolution. Also, I highly doubt the Chinese government could hide the fact that such a revolutionary event had occurred during the PRC's short history.

Yeah right, and yet they can remember in detail EVERYTHING that Japan did to them well before.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@NENE. Anyone in China who would try to open the topic of Tiananmen square massacre will either get assassinated or tortured by their own government(internet freedom in China is also ridiculous[because obviously the government are still hiding the truth TO THEIR PEOPLE]) and here they are talking about accepting what happened in the past? Amazing...

Hypocrisy at its best.... Anyway, Chinese people only believe their governments lies to begin with. Shame... biggest population manipulated by a few men... and yet they are so proud of.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

TO THEIR PEOPLE]) and here they are talking about accepting what happened in the past? Amazing...

Only when their history concerns evil deeds committed against them by the Japanese.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

“A nation should face the tough years in its history,” Zhou Zueyang

VERY wise Idea ... for any nation .......

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

You people can read about Manchukuo in Wikipedia, also it misses many things. Japan married one daughter of a noble to the Manchu Prince. (Puppet or Sacrifice marriage). After 1945, she and her 3 and 4 years daughters walked to go to shore to go back to Japan, by drinking muddy waters. All kind of deceases. Empress died during trip. The name was Hiro Aishin Kakura. Well, they were noble people so they entered Gakushu-in. When children entered, and asked where you lived, they answered ;kangolu; so, Asahi, etc figured they spent time in Chinese jails then. Answers were usually which mansions , etc. Older one later had 'shinju' with her boy friend because theiy could not marry. Manchu people are still suffering. Chu En Rai helped her mother back to China, She did not have freedom in Japan as she was registered as Zai-nichi Kakyo ( Chinese living in Japan). China had her husband to be with her. I'd bet Manchu people are still suffering.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Glad those Chinese netizens were ignored.

Not only Chinese netizens but Chinese citizens are always ignored, big govt. won't let them have a voice, ever!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Maybe it is too cold place to demolish building? The Aishin Kakura people had their limbs frost bitten deeply when they came back to Japan, the younger one stated. It is not like Beijing where historic old buildings are all over in the city. The billionaire Chinese construction related business refused to go there?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They are preserved because they are well-built, not for some historical reason.

Yes.

Some of the buildings are still being used today from government bldg, hotels, department stores, and train stations.

http://www.cpcjapan.com/china/history/manju/manju.html

1 ( +2 / -1 )

There are many Japanese tourists to Manchukou. Some Japanese people lived there and some children at that time grew there. Their children visit there, I read in Japanese magazines.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

These 80 year old Japanese buildings are probably better built than most Chinese buildings.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

If its invaded, enslaved and bullied by others, it should not hide that history but should demonstrate it to the world and let its descendants remember that forever.

However, a war memorial set up in Japan commemorating war-dead from Japan's history is probably protested all over Nanjing University, and the rest of China. Am I wrong?

I think the point here is, no one in Asia will ever forget anything no matter what. Let's all just sit and wait for the next historical relic to cause a dispute...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Just as the Poles have kept Nazi-built concentration camps intact to educate future generations, this is a good move. Learning from textbooks can only paint part of the picture. Glad those Chinese netizens were ignored.

Absolutely... It the reason Nazi Concentration camps are not only still standing, but used as Museums to educate the public.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

These buildings are spetacular and built to superior quality. They should be kept, no questions about that as part of their history.

OssanAmerica@, its not keeping buildings for hatred or nationalism, its like the American's keeping that ship off Hawaii on top of which Japan signed its surrender. Same thing! Heritage.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Speed: Yes, these buildings are really good, thanks to the Chinese slaves who build them... sure beats the paid work their are doing now.

@Harry_Gatto: Tibet has been under Mongol rule for over 1400 years, so what about Tibet? I think the more important issue is Guam, Hawaii, Okinawa..... Western colonialism is justified?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

definitely agree with this, they should be turned into museums

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@CruisinJapan protest would be justified if its to commemorate the war dead criminals in jpn...just like if a national monument was erect to eulogize hitler or tojo

0 ( +0 / -0 )

'Massacre' is too emotive a word to describe the Cultural revolution.

Let's not get emotional over the occasional massacre.

..but who said it was the Cultural Revolution, Neneswsw?

Have you even heard of the Tiananmen Square massacre of students?

Or seen the videotape of a lone student repeatedly blocking a tank trying to maneuver past him (shot by foreign journalists from the 北京飯店), now an icon of nonviolent direct action?

I love China and its people. Therefore censorship, denial of basic rights, house arrests of champions for freedom and the blinkered, ultranationalist conditioning of small children causes me great sadness.

But I'm from a small, neutral country. What could I possibly know?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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