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China aligns with Japan on piracy patrols

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Cooperation is good. Cooperation is what is needed.

Cooperation between Japan and China is exactly what is needed and wanted.

Force of arms doesn't work.

U.S.A. take note.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

a step in the right direction

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The U.S. “continues building a strategic circle to contain China,” National Defense University professor Li Daguang was quoted as saying by the official China News Service.

It worked with russia, why would it not work with china? If China just played by the rules it signed, there wouldn't be so much pressure from the rest of the world.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

What is the language used between two navies? English?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

basroil

It worked with russia, why would it not work with china? If China just played by the rules it signed, there wouldn't be so much pressure from the rest of the world.

And what rules would they be? Please tell me so l can have a good laugh....

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

This is very good news, and yes, the US Navy should be doing more to help not only itself but all innocent ships out there, even now in the 21st Century pirates are a menace! So If the USA could also join more talks not only with India, but ALSO CHINA that would be good not only for Asia but for many, many other parts of the world! IMHO.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

This is very good news, and yes, the US Navy should be doing more to help not only itself but all innocent ships out there, even now in the 21st Century pirates are a menace! So If the USA could also join more talks not only with India, but ALSO CHINA that would be good not only for Asia but for many, many other parts of the world! IMHO.

Excellent post, Elbuda-san. Communication and understanding solves problems. Playing soldiers doesn't.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Its interesting that the world is policing the Somalians while all along it was the rest of the world that fished out the Somalian waters which forced them into piracy as the only way to survive.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

in the whole article about cooperation and competition between the various Asian countries who are trying to be an influence in Africa, there in not one mention of what African country is being part of this "patrolling of the African cost. What cooperation is being set up for assisting Somalia in dealing with pirates on its coastal borders? What of Africa-Asian cooperation? It is interesting that there wan absolutely no real interest in Africa till the Asian countries of India, China and japan started to show real interest in it. Now we want to counter the effects of the 'Yellow Menace" in Africa, while disregarding the peoples and nations of Africa. Is it always about our 'influence' in some part of the world?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Its interesting that the world is policing the Somalians while all along it was the rest of the world that fished out the Somalian waters which forced them into piracy as the only way to survive.

Yeah! I remember all those tales about the massive fishing industry that made Somalia a major linch-pin in the world's food markets. NOT.

What drugs have you been smoking, dude? The fishing issue (and the accusations of foreign vessels dumping hazardous waste) didn't even make an appearance until THE SOMALIS destroyed their own government in the 1991 civil war. No government means no navy. No navy means no one able to police the country's "Exclusive Economic Zone". The waters off of Somalia are described as a marine "tropical forest" in regards to marine life. The area is most certainly NOT "fished-out", it's just that foreign fishing fleets are able to bring in more fish than the governless Somali fiefdoms are able to muster and the Somali fisherman are now feeling the effects of their ill-advised civil war. The fishing fleets could have still made the same living they had before, they just decided that piracy was a quicker way to make $50,000 per trip than catching and selling fish.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

". . . fished out the Somalian waters which forced them into piracy . . ." like the Massachusetts lobster and crab fisherman who turned piracy when Cap Cod was over fished? I would change "forced" to "motivated."

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Real reason might be that these Chinese naval force is protecting the Chinese fishing boats containing fish stocks caught illegally. China has economic interest in these waters. So the fleets from Europe and Asia, including China and Japan are operating illegally and moved into the open East African waters to fish. And they are overfishing, plundering the oceans of fish stocks. The ripple effect is enormous, decimating the livelihoods of many Somali fishermen. There is concern that this root cause of the Somali piracy issue has been badly managed by the international community. These warships that police the passageway of the Gulf of Aden are not tasked with shutting down these offshore fisheries that continue to operate without jurisdiction.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is a smart move by China in showing leadership in foreign policy.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's about time China did something about piracy... ;)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Primary reason is to show a good face to India and Japan, China is very sensitive to being perceived in bad light by foreign media. Second is to build up the ability of their own navy. It's one thing to build ships and submarines, it is another entirely to have the actual know-how of global navy deployments far away from home.

As the article said, this will not in any way change China's policy in territorial disputes with Japan, India, and other Asian nations.

Elbuda Mexicano Jul. 03, 2012 - 07:46PM JST

and yes, the US Navy should be doing more to help not only itself but all innocent ships out there

The US Navy already patrols and has patrolled those waters for quite some time. The US Navy already operates with multinational forces, especially European naval task forces, in that region. And yes, the US Navy has aided non-US ships already, seems you've missed those news when it benefits your image of the United States.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What drugs have you been smoking, dude? The fishing issue (and the accusations of foreign vessels dumping hazardous waste) didn't even .......CUT lots of half baked OPINIONS ONLY........just decided that piracy was a quicker way to make $50,000 per trip than catching and selling fish.

Doesn't appear you have read much to form these opinions.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

China isn't working with other nations, is learning.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Was i the only person that read the headline and thaught it was talking about pirated movies?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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