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China praises Korean assassin whom Japan calls a 'criminal'

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Why glorify the criminal? A criminal is not a hero.

1 ( +38 / -37 )

Dude manned up and did what he had to do to try and protect his country from being taken over by a Faciest foreign power. Give the guy a statue. It really is time for Japan to stop pretending it was the victim in the first half of the 20th century.

23 ( +53 / -32 )

Children.

9 ( +25 / -16 )

Depends who won, Korea is free and democratic so they can call him whatever they want, Some Japanese call Tojo a hero while the Allied victors hanged him as a criminal. Yaskuni shrine glorifies his spirit. Colonialism and war suck, end of story. Old enemies need to make new friendships.

30 ( +42 / -12 )

I'm just happy that Japan won this match and the cup of course. Who cares about this Ahn whatever. It's time to move on and stop mentioning painful stuff from history. This kinda stuff will only cause more trouble. Korea,China,Japan stop this pillow fight and hug to death please.

-3 ( +19 / -22 )

How about a statue of Park Geun-Hye's father in his Imperial Japanese Army uniform?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Park_Japan.JPG

9 ( +29 / -20 )

To Japan, Pot-Kettle-Black, to Korea and China, rubbing salt in old wounds does no one any good.

Grow up, all three of you. It's time you started acting your ages!

13 ( +22 / -9 )

China are you stupid? A criminal is never a hero and will never, ever, ever, ever be considered a hero and will always considered A CRIMINAL AND MURDERER. Whoever this stupid Korean was he deserved the punishment for doing wrong and killing a Japanese Official.

-14 ( +24 / -37 )

Japan has no right to be upset about this while denying history, visiting Yasukuni, white-washing texts, and rescinding apologies.

15 ( +44 / -29 )

Japan has a shrine to war criminals. Hard to feel any sympathy to the Japanese on this on. They just got a dose of their own medicine.

19 ( +35 / -16 )

t's time to move on and stop mentioning painful stuff from history.

Wrong, when has that ever worked?

Better to present all the facts and then move on. South Africa did it with it's Black and White Truth and Reconciliation commissions, Northern Ireland with it's Orange and Green divide did, why can't these Asians who all share the same DNA not do it? Trouble is Japan (has and still does) sees itself as superior to it's former colonial neighbors. That makes it hard to eat humble pie and sincerely confront the truth (witness the lack of education about it's colonisation of East Asia in public schooling), it's humiliating and of course paying money is easier. Why can't Japan as the economically and democratically (thank you USA) mature party in this relationship and the former aggressor not have taken the higher ground and mended fences when it's neighbors weren't so strong? That boat has sailed now and Japan missed it, now all it's leaders can do is strut around crying poor us and ramp up it's defenses. Guess what, it's neighbors are doing the same.

6 ( +18 / -12 )

Japan should just acknowledge that each country has a right to choose and glorify its heroes.

16 ( +25 / -9 )

China glorifies Mao, who murdered millions of Chinese and Koreans and Korea has its own leadership in the uniform of Japan during WWII....there was a time when Korea and China were ok with just winning the war. Now they want a Japan on its knees under under their control. Thank God for the USA, as long as the USA is with Japan all Korea and China can do is stew in their own hate and anger.

5 ( +22 / -17 )

Now they want a Japan on its knees under under their control.

Huh? Got proof of that? please back up that statement with some logic.

-2 ( +12 / -14 )

If he's a criminal, then Tojo is a criminal, as well as the dead Emperor is a criminal, as well as the Japanese who plotted and were responsible for the murder of Korean queen are also a criminals. What about the Japanese who tortured and killed the 16 year old Korean girl who lead the peaceful demonstration against Japanese rule in 1919's March 1 movement? Aren't those Japanese responsible for her murder, also criminals? Of course, Japan has all their memorials to all these criminals, and honors them as heroes.

9 ( +25 / -15 )

The article title says a criminal.

What is truely criminal is if the countries here mentioned continue to in their hatred of the past toward eachother.

Yes, war and colonization is terrible beyond words.

Just as damaging is holding onto the past and becoming a victim. All of the countries mentioned here are doing it, and you see when that attitude is taken, you become childish as an adult.

Sri Lanka forgave Japan for WWII, and you can see that their actions shows it. They have been abel to move on. I hope other countries can follow suit.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Thank God for the USA, as long as the USA is with Japan all Korea and China can do is stew in their own hate and anger.

I don't know. The policies of the US and China are getting close enough to each other that for the rest of us it won't matter which country takes over as world police. Both come with their pluses and negatives, and the Chinese pluses are getting closet to outweighing the American negatives.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

Wow, talk about bad politics on both sides, but especially from the Japanese government. Do they not comprehend what they are actually saying by arguing that Ahn was a mere criminal? Way to hand loads of ammo to the other side...frigging stupid!

3 ( +11 / -8 )

Chucky3176,

Japanese colonial government liberally tortured those who were arrested on the suspicion of independence movement for Korea. As you mentioned, the most well-documented case is that of Yoo, Guan-soon, who was a 19-year-old student of Ewha School when she played a key role in organizing largest mass-protest against the Japanese rule. Yoo was arrested and died in prison The returned body of Yoo was in six pieces and her scalp was missing, and her nose and ears had been cut off, and all of her finger and toenails were plucked off. Brutal suppression of independence movement was not limited to individuals. Japanese military police marched into a village known for its Christian-based independence movement. The police rounded up roughly 30 Christians in the village into the town church, locked the doors and set the building on fire. Over 20 people died trapped in the building, and many were shot outside of the church as they tried to escape.

12 ( +22 / -10 )

“We have been telling the South Korean government that Ahn Jung-Geun was a criminal,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga, the government’s top spokesman, told reporters on Tuesday.

I think this is the most telling line and shows that there really is no remorse or contrition on the part of the Japanese government. He is saying here that he doesn't really understand that Korea was an occupied country. This statement shows that the government of Japan now has not distanced itself from the government of Japan then, this is the frightening fact. To the Japanese government- will you please put a distance between Japan today and the this despicable time.

Why glorify the criminal? A criminal is not a hero.

Just out of interest were the French resistance in world war 2 criminals? Should they have sat back and allowed the Nazis to occupy their country?

5 ( +13 / -8 )

Regardless of this guy being a hero to some, a criminal to some, I think it is stupid to use a football/soccer game to push your opinion on history which has nothing to do with the game. Next time U.S. plays Japan, I will take big posters of the soldiers raising the flag in Iwo Jima and see if that tickles your fancy.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Simply amazing ignorance on the part of Japanese politicians. The man is a hero, he fought for his country's freedom.

For example, Finns still praise the memory of Eugen Schauman. He murdered the Russian governor-general of Finland (Bobrikov) in 1904, who tried to enforce a policy of "russification" on the country. The murderer committed suicide at the spot. Quite similar circumstances as with Ito, even if with slight differences. Schauman has his own memorial and is treated as a national hero in Finland. To Russians he's a criminal and murderer. But do we fly off the handle and demand the Finns disown him? No way. We understand that there are two sides to the issue and respect their right to independence and glorifying those who fought for it. End of story. And it should be the end of story for Japan as well.

5 ( +13 / -8 )

notasapNov. 20, 2013 - 08:07AM JST China glorifies Mao, who murdered millions of Chinese and Koreans and Korea has its own leadership in the uniform >of Japan during WWII....there was a time when Korea and China were ok with just winning the war.

Korea won what war? Korea was part of Japan in WWII and 240,000 Koreans were in the Imperial Japanese military.

-9 ( +11 / -20 )

@OssanAmerica

"240,000 Koreans were in the Imperial Japanese military"

You conveniently forget that they were pressed into service.

8 ( +17 / -9 )

Nice euphemism. 'In the Japanese military' nicely glosses over that they were conscripted.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

He was defending his country. He is a hero to the people there and they have every right to honor him. During the U.S.' fight for independence, George Washington was considered a terrorist by the British but he is considered America's greatest hero by the public. Same goes for Nelson Mandela in South Africa.

6 ( +14 / -8 )

this begs the question of the Japanese Government as to whether the 50 or so assassins of Quenn Min were also criminals (following the orders or the Japanese Government). and that was cold blooded murder of a woman, Queen or not, and after two other cortisans had been killed by 'mistake' before they found Queen Min. honestly, although i live in Japan, the ruling classes here collectively disgust me with their total disregard and lack or compassion about the horrors their ancestors (quite often actually their family ancestors - ref Abe and his Grandfather, a wartime cabinet member) inflicted on most of the rest of Asia and the Pacific region in the first 45 years or the last century especially. they quite literally do not give a monkey's. however, unlike them, me and my Japanese wife and children will be able to leave this country, as refugees and with nothing if necessary, if and when they lead this country into the sh1t one more time.

3 ( +10 / -7 )

Unbelievably childish and irresponsible statement by Suga. Was it an in-supressable urge to answer every tit with a tat and call that manliness?

While Hitobumi was governor of Korea, he was involved in a dispute with the army faction. Hitobumi wanted Korea to be a military protectorate of Japan and maintain its own government, while the army-faction wanted and was allowed to make Korea become a directly governed province of Japan. Hitobumi lost, then he resigned; he didn't say that was why he resigned, but it is likely the reason why. Several months later he was assassinated.

There exists a theory in Japan (although only a theory) that Hitobumi was setup up by the militarists (I confirmed this by reading 2chan comments), because the militarists did indeed gain by his assassination. But its even longer ago than Kennedy. However, it is unlikely his continued life would have made any difference to the overall course of events.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

How about getting over the past, and grow up? If Germany could with the rest of world, why not China, Korea and Japan.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

@spudman

The Allies didn't seem to think quite in the same manner. France fought. True, they did not have separate armies, but there were very many Free French battalions among the British forces, and even in the ranks of the Soviet Army. So yes, they did win their battles and did earn their freedom. Not to mention the effort of civilian populace in hiding Allied airmen, escaped POWs and in conducting guerilla warfare.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

But the fact is Japan still kicked Korea and China's butts, and I have little doubt they would kick them again if pushed.

Both China and Korea suffer from an inferiority complex, which is why they always feel the need to entice anti-Japanese sentiment. Sad, really..

-1 ( +12 / -13 )

I think Japan should look at what their lawmakers are doing ie worshiping those class A war criminals in Yasukuni shrine. I'm all for paying tribute to those soldiers who fought and died for their country but not war criminals What goes round come a round !!

3 ( +9 / -6 )

Great...Let them do that. We will continue visiting Yasukuni Shrine...Our one visit makes them more agitated than that.

-8 ( +6 / -14 )

@Doug Birbeck

"the ruling classes here collectively disgust me with their total disregard and lack or compassion"

That's because they were never held responsible for it. Yes, a few fish were hanged, but the rest swam out of reach. In part the fault of the U.S. as they needed to keep Japan as an ally against the USSR (the Cold War started just about then, even before WWII officially ended).

What we have now though is a bunch of rich kids who have been brainwashed by their elders that it's ok to commit crimes. The bigger crimes the better, since you don't get anything for them. A suspected chikan gets his life ruined, but a proven war criminal with millions of lives on his consience gets to live happily ever after.

The same, by the way happened in post-war Germany, most of those sentenced at Nurnberg got out a couple years later and wrote memoirs! The Western politicians wanted to get anti-Soviets back on track and on the move again as quickly as possible. The only difference being that Germany itself got bombed into the stone age and are reluctant to repeat the experiment again. Not the case in Japan.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

I'm all for paying tribute to those soldiers who fought and died for their country but not war criminals What goes round come a round !!

Sorry, but the only difference between a "war criminal" and a "war hero" is who won the war. War itself is criminal.

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

The more I ponder this the more I think the Abe govt. is being set up by Korea and China. What is Abe going to do when the South Koreans challenge him to publicly explain WHY Ahn is a mere criminal? Frankly, the international community doesn't pay much attention to SK/NK/China calling Japan unrepentantly militaristic because it's been used politically so many times, but what about if they could provoke the Abe government to actually say it themselves? How could they use the fallout from such an explanation as leverage in territorial disputes? The Abe government needs to stuff a sock in its mouth promptly.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

@papasmurfinjapan

"Both China and Korea suffer from an inferiority complex, which is why they always feel the need to entice anti-Japanese sentiment. Sad, really.."

I think you are overlooking something here. Both these nations are, for the first time in their history, experience a clear development of national sentiment.

China used to be a collection of different peoples, languages and ideas and to some extent is still that. But for the first time they are feeling a uniting force in being Chinese, and feeling good about it. It takes a while for the sentiment to develop, so I tend to see the Communist times as a formative period there. Besides, during Communism it wasn't about China so much as it was about Communism. But suddenly it's no longer about Communism, Emperors or Buddha, but China.

Korea experienced the same in a different manner, in the south they were hampered by the division of the Korean War. But now the same thing is happening there too.

What I do agree on is that this development of nationalism is going to lead to trouble.. especially with a neighbour like Japan which has a "fossilized" nationalism that's about to resurrect itself. Trouble brewing in Asia on all sides.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

StrangerlandNov. 20, 2013 - 09:44AM JST Nice euphemism. 'In the Japanese military' nicely glosses over that they were conscripted.

No, it's no euphemism. They served willingly. The numbers far exceeded conscription quotas and most applicants were in fact rejected. Mandatory recruitment did not go into effect until 1944 when the war was well heading towards the end.

-8 ( +7 / -15 )

Two Japanese magazines this week, Shukan Post and FLASH, ran articles advocating an economic boycott of South Korea. Perhaps this would be all for the best. If the two countries can't get along, they should simply ignore each other's existence. Start by cutting off trade and tourism, and drop those weepy Korean melodramas from the TV fare. Let Japanese news media agree to drop the word "Kankoku" (S. Korea) from articles and broadcasts, and replace them with something else, at least until passions die down.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Let us see what Ito Hirobumi did.

He was one of the leaders who brought down the feudal government of Tokugawa Shogunate.

He abolished social classes and discrimination among Samurai, farmers, craftsmen and merchants.

He introduced Constitution and, with it, introduced due process of law, freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of association and freedom of movement. He established the Parliament, the Cabinet and the Court.

He was the Prime Minister of Japan during the First Sino Japan War. As a result of the war, China recognized the independence of Korea from China in Shimonoseki Treaty. Koreans cerebrated Japanese victory and their independence, and built Dokripmun (Gate of Independence) in Seoul.

If he were not assassinated by An, Japan would have had different course of history.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

Japan should make a movie about how heinous this criminal was to kill Hirobumi Ito, who was a family man and gave his life protecting his responsibility which his country bestowed on him.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

If the Korean and the Chinese think the dude is a hero, same logic should be applied to heroes in Yasukuni shrines. Koreans and Chinese should have no say in politicians visiting yasukuni since its just a matter of perspective, right!? ownage

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

No, it's no euphemism. They served willingly. The numbers far exceeded conscription quotas and most applicants were in fact rejected. Mandatory recruitment did not go into effect until 1944 when the war was well heading towards the end.

Please tell me you aren't naive enough to believe that the supposed 'volunteers' we're volunteering of their own violation. The kamikaze pilots also 'volunteered'. It's not really volunteering when you have no choice though.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

I can understand that Korea wants to honor one of their 'heroes,' but why do they feel the need to do so during a soccer match? Comes across more like juvenile provocation than anything. Proof again of how insecure and ridden with inferiority complex these Koreans are. No wonder nobody takes them and their country seriously.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

All readers back on topic please. From here on, posts that do not focus on Ahn Jung-Geun will be removed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is also so interesting...the Korean football fans have other agenda than watching the game every time! They must have meetings before going to the game! "What are we going to this time?" "Let's display a huge portrait that we have been preparing for past 2 months. We bought 300 tickets and paid 300 part timers to hold it during the game."

7 ( +10 / -3 )

The issue here is that Korea is wanting China to erect a statue in China. Park Geun-Hye is the one who asked China to allow this.

All countries have a right to their own opinions about their own "heroes" but why does Korea want to get China involved? And will China really do this? The Chinese government may want to keep antagonizing Japan, but to support a statue for a Korean person who assassinated a senior Japanese governmental official in the name of freedom and independence would seem to be very dangerous. Does the Chinese government want to encourage dissidents within their own country? And as far as I know, the Chinese government has never allowed any foreign statutes to be built within China for freedom-fighters.

It's all political in nature. If it was of any real historical value, why now?

The Chinese will keep saying yes, we will consider it positively for at least until the end of Park's tenure, no doubt, but never actually allow it.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

Japan should ridicule this rather than confronting...make a ghost comics character named AJG...and let his ghost come to the dreams of the Chinese/Korean politicians so he can get his statue erected in places!

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Apart of me feels as though the only reason why Korea is glorifying this individual is because it's a petty attempt to get back at Japan for all the Yasukuni controversy. At the same time, there is no way to know Korea's real intention. So the best course of action for Japan is just to let this go and not even acknowledge it. This is a perfect example of one's own interpretation of history. It's not worth squabbling over something that happened over a 100 years ago. Don't dwell on the past people; need to start looking toward the future.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Hmmm, does "China" think Chiang Kai Shek a hero?

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I heard rumors by south korean friends that they fear China is just waiting for north korea to crumble so it can take the land which 'belongs to china since ancient times' lol, china must be happy that the south is going along well. Y dont the koreans glorify all the assassinations done by china 'since ancient times'? lol i bet china has colonized the koreans dozens if not hundreds of time over more than japan in history. puff

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Its the Chinese and Korean version of visiting the Yasukuni Shrine..... all based on the views one has.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Its the Chinese and Korean version of visiting the Yasukuni Shrine..... all based on the views one has

Unless China and Korea were occupying Japan and committing atrocities it isn't. You really can't see the difference?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

China is instigating Korea to open War against Japan because it has bad experience with Japan and knows it will never win against Japan. Chucky: Didn;t you know USA gave verdict of A class criminal to Hideki tojo and he was hang? This guy assassinated Hirobumi Ito but He was not only one hated Japanese colonializ=sm, then, Big headache to USA. Smiling N. Korea.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

the children are at it again, sigh........

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Japan can write its own history and 'reeducate' its population into ignorance. The world will still remember what happened, even if they choose to forget.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

I wonder how the South Korans feel about the Chinese army involvement in the Korean War.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Way to "stay classy," China! Sheesh...

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I've often said that when Korea reunites, look out Japan! Korea and China will naturally ally to undermine Japan, a country that already faces a depopulation trend. NK, while being a constant wildcard, is actually a much less certain threat than a Sino-Korean united front against Japan.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

When cowards run out of options they resort to low blows as last resort.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

budgieNov. 20, 2013 - 12:12PM JST

Japan can write its own history and 'reeducate' its population into ignorance.

Wow, what do Japanese not know about the assassination of Ito by An? Saying the other side are ignorant is a symptom of bigotry. By saying so, he closes his ears to criticism.

gaihonjinNov. 20, 2013 - 12:50PM JST

I've often said that when Korea reunites, look out Japan! Korea and China will naturally ally to undermine Japan

I would say, when North Korea and South Korea are united, it will start a war against China over the sovereignty of Yeon Byeon Korean Autonomous Prefecture. Korea will have much more to worry about with China than with Japan.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

@CH3CHO ... Let us see what Ito Hirobumi did. ... If he were not assassinated by An, Japan would have had different course of history.

He also advocated making Korea a protectorate (meaning Korea would keep its own civil government) , whereas the militarist sect of government advocated making Korea a part of Japan. Hirobumi lost the decision. Then he resigned from his post as governor of Korea. Although he didn't say the lost decision was why he resigned, we know that is why. A few months later he was assassinated.

He had no ability to stop the tsunami of militarism already sweeping Japan. It would have made no difference if he had lived.

I am sure you know Takahashi Korekiyo. Another great Meiji genius leader and founding father of modern Japan. Takahashi Korekiyo was not that wealthy, so to learn English he indentured himself for three years as a servant in Oakland California (where I spent many years growing up). Remember that at that time in the late 1800's anti-Oriental racism was rampant and most would not have treated him as an equal human being; it must have been very tough hard work. He was an economic genius like similar to founding father Alexander Hamilton in the US. He helped to raise foreign loans to fund the war with Russia in 1904, and for this he was awarded a peerage. Later he became Prime Minister of Japan.

Unfortunately he was assassinated during the 2-2 jiken (Feb 2 incident) by rouge young militarists trying to stage a coup. You can visit the room in which he was assassinated, his house was moved to edo tatemono hakabutsukan in Koganei near the Chuo line in Western Tokyo. The coup failed, 19 officers were executed.

Can you cry for Ito Hitobumi and not cry for Takahashi Korekiyo?

5 ( +7 / -2 )

@Onsen

The issue here is that Korea is wanting China to erect a statue in China. Park Geun-Hye is the one who asked China to allow this. All countries have a right to their own opinions about their own "heroes" but why does Korea want to get China involved? And will China really do this? The Chinese government may want to keep antagonizing Japan, but to support a statue for a Korean person who assassinated a senior Japanese governmental official in the name of freedom and independence would seem to be very dangerous. Does the Chinese government want to encourage dissidents within their own country? And as far as I know, the Chinese government has never allowed any foreign statutes to be built within China for freedom-fighters. It's all political in nature. If it was of any real historical value, why now? The Chinese will keep saying yes, we will consider it positively for at least until the end of Park's tenure, no doubt, but never actually allow it.

I completely agree with you. This is very risky for China due to their domestic conditions, and they are well aware of that. In any case, Chinese are more realists than Koreans are. (Sorry, Korean people, I agree with the article of "Bunshun")

They keep saying "We second that", but the statue building would never be realized.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

actually I'm surprised at the Japanese reaction. Even Germans don't view the people who were in power before and during the war as emblematic of who they are today nor would defend them. Why should Japanese defend such a history?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Because the Japanese are still the same people as they were before the war. They have changed what they do and how they do it, but they are still the same people at heart. Give them the chance and they will repeat their actions that led to their part in WWII.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

All countries have a right to their own opinions about their own "heroes" but why does Korea want to get China involved?

Because Ito Hirobumi was assassinated in Harbin, in what is now the PRC. Park wants a statue where this happened, and obviously the ROK has no jurisdiction over the Chinese territory. Also, the Korean Provisional government was station in China, working for the freedom of Korea from Japan's rule. China has everything to do with the Koreans who were fighting the Japanese who occupied their land. Does that make any sense?

4 ( +10 / -6 )

CraigHicksNov. 20, 2013 - 02:15PM JST

Takahashi Korekiyo was assassinated in 226 jiken, not 2-2 jiken.

Can you cry for Ito Hitobumi and not cry for Takahashi Korekiyo?

When did I say I support the assassination of Takahashi? No one in Japan today would support the assassination of Takahashi. Then, what does 226 jiken has to do with An?

Hirobumi lost the decision. Then he resigned from his post as governor of Korea. Although he didn't say the lost decision was why he resigned, we know that is why. A few months later he was assassinated. He had no ability to stop the tsunami of militarism already sweeping Japan. It would have made no difference if he had lived.

Ito was the Chairman of the Privy Council when he was assassinated. In those days, the Prime Minister was appointed, not by the majority vote of the Parliament, but by His Majesty upon the recommendation of the Privy Council. Ito had quite a lot of political power and would have changed a lot of things if he had been alive.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

That's an ignorant comment to make. Historically, Korea was never aggressive militarily and never attacked Japan, it was always the other way around - a constant thorn on Korea's sides for thousands of years. Same thing with China.. Korea too busy defending themselves from barbarian northern tribes from the north, while Japanese attacking from south. Korea has always considered An to be a hero. Why is Japan all of a sudden making this into a big issue? Because Japan is turning right wing fascists. In few more years, they'll probably try to take Dokdo by military force. This outburst by Japan over An's statue says it all, what they're thinking and where they're headed.

I would say, when North Korea and South Korea are united, it will start a war against China over the sovereignty of Yeon Byeon Korean Autonomous Prefecture. Korea will have much more to worry about with China than with Japan.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Way to take the moral high ground...I can't see how you build a memorial to an assassin then cry foul when a Japanese PM goes to a shrine. But maybe thats just my common sense showing.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Well, if Ahn killing Ito at least delayed the annexation of Korea, that might have been something. But Ito was anti-annexation. Though he did lose the fight, losing a fight is not the end of his political influence. If he stayed alive, at the very very least the Japanese might have been in a slightly better mood to be gentle when the annexation did happen.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Japan shouldn't complain. A more sensible policy would be to refuse to comment on or be drawn into discussion about events that happened more than 25 years ago.

You don't hear Americans complaining about Brits burning down the White House or Brits complaining about the Norman invasion, South Africans complaining about British concentration camps or the Tunisians complaining about the Punic Wars. East Asians should lighten up, focus more on the future than the past and get a life!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

One important thing you ignore: Japan occupied Korea. Korea never occupied Japan. Two completely different things. Japan building memorials for war criminals who occupied Korea is not equivalent to Koreans building memorials for freedom fighters. And this wouldn't have happened if Japanese military wasn't so blood thirsty - they started the fight, not Korea.

Way to take the moral high ground...I can't see how you build a memorial to an assassin then cry foul when a Japanese PM goes to a shrine. But maybe thats just my common sense showing.

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

Koreans once built this assassin's statue by themselves in China. So, China took it down. Korea built in Russia, but they took it down too. I have heard In Japan, Ishikawa prefecture, they built his statue, and still there.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

chucky, my question is why now? What do you think is the motive/reasoning that Park asked for this to China? And why the news now that China is thinking about it? If he is such a hero, why didn't Korea ask in the past? It's been nearly 100 years! And is there a need to build a statue there to emphasize WHERE the assasination took place?

0 ( +8 / -8 )

hikkifan17@ A criminal can not be a hero, so who is Abe worshiping at Yasukuni? They are convicted war criminals, the US convicted them.

Anyway whats the big deal our politicians visit Yasukuni and ignore complaints. Korea and China should build their own Yasukuni and the we can complain.... World News will be empty without the three of us....

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Easy answer Onsen. It's perfect timing now, when Japanese like Abe are denying every facets of the past history and coming up with all the revisionisms. As memories fade, as those people who were there die, Japan's revisionism gets worse and worse to the point that the majority of Japanese believe Japan was never aggressive towards their neighbors. Why not raise that statue to counter Japan's aggressive remodifying of history?

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

It's just incredible how people here are trying to equate memorial for Ahn with Yasukuni. Ahn is a symbol of a freedom fighter for Koreans. What happened to Korea after Ahn's death proves he was right. The peaceful protest march in March 1, 1919, took place in 300 cities throughout Korea. Koreans were demanding their country to be freed from Japan's rule. What happened was just absolute cruelty by Japanese troops who indescriminately fired on Korean protestors. They then went on a bloody rampage throughout Korea, ransacking 200 cities, burning down schools, churches, and killing thousands of innocent unarmed Koreans - of all ages from old peoples to young children. Eight thousand Koreans were murdered cold blooded, and at least 50,000 were arrested and tortured. The protests went on for two months, and the Japanese troops showed no mercy in bringing down the resistance. They burned villages, they shot at people, and beat them mercilessly. I guess this is what Ahn was fighting against. If he was a common criminal assassin, then what about these Japanese heroes that murdered people by the masses? Oh yes, Japan calls them heroes, patriots, defenders of Japan. Why isn't Japan questioning these people's wrong doings? There's nothing in Japan's textbooks to teach what happened, so nobody even know what happened. The only thing they're told are what the government of Japan endorses.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

One man's freedom fighter is other man's terrorist. Ahn's act can easily be classified as hate crime. Ahn, also known as Thomas, who was actually a French speaking Catholic, planned and executed a cold blooded murder of Ito, a Buddhist General from Nihongo speaking Japanese. You can see it anyway you want!

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Papi2013: "It's just incredible how people here are trying to equate memorial for Ahn with Yasukuni. Ahn is a symbol of a freedom fighter for Koreans."

I agree with you 100%, and in fact tried to make a similar statement earlier on in the day but it would not post because it had 'potentially offensive comment' (although I tried each and every word on the thread to see what the 'offensive' stuff was but it still would not post). In Japan some consider actual war criminals to be heroes, whereas Ahn was an actual hero who tried to fight against colonial plans and the aggression that would be brought on by the IAJ. The only way you can possibly compare the two in any way whatsoever is to say that honoring Ahn is in part a reaction to Ministers visiting Yasukuni. Again, though, there is no comparison beyond that, and of course that's not taking into account all the other atrocities.

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

It seems that there actually was a statue of Ahn in Harbing in the past, and not too long ago.

http://www.rjkoehler.com/2006/03/23/beijing-ordered-removal-of-ahn-jung-geun-statue-in-harbin/

The statue was unveiled on January 16, 2006 in Harbing. But Beijing ordered for its removal only 10 days after the unveiling...

http://www.hanyangian.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=218

Hearing the news that the statue of Ahn Jung-geun, who is the symbol of Korean spirit and pride, has no where to belong yet, the Bucheon city decided to put the statue of Ahn in Bucheon Joongang park to mark the 100th anniversary of Ahn’s assassination.

So no-one wanted the returned statue?

And yet Beijing is now saying that they will “China will in accordance with relevant regulations on memorial facilities involving foreigners make a study to push forward relevant work.”

Hmm. Make a study...it's been 5 months since Park asked China....

And everyone has forgotten that the previous statue was removed under Beijing orders...

Learning from the past, I see. Way to go.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

smithinjapanNov. 20, 2013 - 04:19PM JST

whereas Ahn was an actual hero who tried to fight against colonial plans and the aggression that would be brought on by the IAJ.

So, you justify assassination to pursue political agenda. Ends justify means, right? A lot of terrorists would be glad to hear your comment. But I do not go that far to justify assassination, much less praise an assassin.

2 ( +12 / -10 )

Time for China to re-bait the trap.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

“We have been telling the South Korean government that Ahn Jung-Geun was a criminal,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga, the government’s top spokesman, told reporters on Tuesday. “I’m afraid this is not good for relations between Japan and South Korea.”

This is like the German government calling anti-Nazi fighters as criminals. It simply shows us that the current Japanese government is absolutely unrepentant about its fascist expansion and colonization of its neighbors during the State-Shinto period from 1868 to 1945.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

I can't see how you build a memorial to an assassin then cry foul when a Japanese PM goes to a shrine.

They didn't. They cried foul, then built a statue. You got the order of events backwards.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

He was hanged the following year, when Korea also became a formal Japanese colony, heralding a brutal occupation which lasted until the end of World War II in 1945.

so the japanese already hanged him. i think that should be the end of japanese story/involvement. now that korea is running its own affairs and want to recognize its own citizens who were pro-independence, i just dont see any reason for japan to oppose such efforts as if its (japan) still colonize SK. the one that japan is doing in yasukuni is far alot more....worse, or shall i say beyond understanding - worshiping those who kill innocent millions just because they have the power to do so.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I'm confused why people are getting downvoted for telling these three goverments to move on. Should they rwmain in this ridiculous political quagmire instead of cooperating for the sakes of everyone in the region?

I feel the same as the aforementioned. Childish politics. It's even more sad that people actually eat this up instead of questioning things. Sure, I used to repeat what I heard from my Dad or some bogus news story, too...when I was ten.

Point is, nothing is black and white, except those two colors. But even that is debatable. It's never as simple as, "They all hate us, so we should hate them".

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Let us see what Ito Hirobumi did....If he were not assassinated by An, Japan would have had different course of history.

If the evil Ito Hirobumi were killed even earlier, Japanese probably would not have been subjected to the following brainwashing that lasted many decades:

"From 1890 onwards until 1945, every school child in Japan, for every school day of his life, dedicated himself to his Emperor. Much like the Muslims, who pray to Allah, facing Mecca; every morning, all Japanese pupils bowed in the direction of the Imperial Palace, repeated by heart the long Imperial Rescript on Education, then sang the national anthem, and waited breathlessly for the question, 'What is your dearest ambition? 'To which, in passionate unified response, the entire school replied, 'To die for the Emperor!'

According to the state-run Shinto cult, the Japanese 'eight hundred myriad' gods, who are the highest beings in the cosmos, are conceived to be the ancestors of the Japanese race, which makes the Japanese themselves gods by descent, and their land 'the land of the gods'. Being direct descendants of the gods, this makes them the highest beings on earth-the master race is thus entrusted with the mandate to rule the inhabitants of the world who are not their equal.

To endow the Japanese people with a sense of self-confidence, and to confer sustenance to the master race theory, the 'Tokyo Anthropological Society' claimed in 1936,

"The Japanese people were created on the islands of Japan, and are a superior race supporting an unbroken dynasty for all ages, and having no racial origin outside of the Japanese islands" (Through Japanese Eyes, p.16).

Otto Tolischus explains further:

"In this divine hierarchy, the Japanese Emperor, as descendant of the Sun Goddess, the ruler of the Heavens, has been invested with the rule of the earth, and is the highest-ranking god on earth, to whom all men owe obedience. And the Japanese themselves, being descendants of other lesser gods who attended the Sun Goddess's grandson on his descent from Heaven, are also gods, and therefore superior to all men on earth, who at the most are descended from the 'Earthly Deities' against whom the Sun Goddess's descendants had to fight. And when the Japanese die, especially when they die in fulfilling the will of the gods, they are promoted to the rank of higher gods, or kami (at Yasukuni Shrine) and become the patron gods of the Japanese race" ( Tokyo Record, p.148)."

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Korea has the right to flip off Japan by building the memorial...what I don't think it has the right to do is to scream how bad Japan is for not using its every waking hour to hate itself. It's silly and pointless. (Sorry if I offended anyone)

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Look! The 'Dig old wounds' warfare of these three countries has gone out of control and the consequences might be very serve and dangerous! Do you guys remember that Balkan war in Yugoslavia 1990s was the Serbs, Croats, Bsinians, albanians all of them cant get along due to history and religious matter! Those three countries(China, Japan, ROK) has learned nothing known as 'respect' at each other! Sure both China and ROK shouldnt dig old wounds being part of their politics but Shinzo Abe has instigated the conflict first by denial of 'Murayama statement 1995' ! How dare the japanese government has a reason to blame others?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

smithinjapanNov. 20, 2013 - 04:19PM JST

Guru29Nov. 20, 2013 - 05:11PM JST

Do you know US diplomat Mr. Durham White Stevens? When Japan Korea Agreement of 1904 was concluded, Japanese government appointed Mr. Stevens as the advisor of Korean government for foreign affairs, as a first step to put Korea under Japanese influence.

In 1908, Mr. Stevens was assassinated in San Francisco by Koreans, Jang In-hwan and Jeon Myeong-un because they thought he was against independence of Korea .

Do you think Jang and Jeon are heroes as well who fought against Japanese rule of Korea? Do you think City of San Francisco should build a monument to commemorate Jang and Jeon? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durham_Stevens

4 ( +10 / -6 )

However, Ironically, Hirobumi Ito who was killed, claiming Korean right in Japanese government....

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The families of Mr Ito and Mr Ann has compromised but not their countries!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Guru29,

Copy and paste right from "Hope of Israel Ministries"

http://www.hope-of-israel.org/

THIS is the source of your information? WOW!

In any case, an assassination is murder. Someone committing a murder is a criminal. They get tried and sentenced. How else would you expect Japan to treat Ahn? Korea and Japan were not under war at that time. This has been the Japanese standpoint all along. Nothing new, as Suga mentioned.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Let us see what Ito Hirobumi did....If he were not assassinated by An, Japan would have had different course of history.

Whether the evil Ito Hirobumi was directly involved in the brutal murder of Empress Myeongseong of Korea in her palace in 1895 is not yet known since the Japanese government has refused to reveal its role in the murder. However, it is believed that his Choshu clique from Yamaguchi prefecture is responsible for the murder of Emperor Komei of Japan, the father of Emperor Meiji. From Wikipedia,

"In January 1867 the emperor was diagnosed with smallpox. This caused surprise because it was said that Kōmei had never been ill before. On 30 January 1867 he suffered a fatally violent bout of vomiting and diarrhea. He had purple spots on his face caused by smallpox. It is widely thought that he was assassinated, probably by radicals from Choshu, as he drew closer to the Shogun in mutually seeking to define a way forward for Japan under increasingly challenging circumstances. There are no indications that anyone that he came into contact with before contracting the disease had been infected, so it is thought that a handkerchief or the like contaminated with the virus was transferred to him through some conduit in the court."

Do you know US diplomat Mr. Durham White Stevens?

The US government did encourage Japan to annex Korea in the Taft-Katsura agreement in 1905, saying that the annexation of Korea by Japan would contribute directly to permanent peace in East Asia:

"Secretary Taft fully admitted the justness of the Count’s observations and remarked to the effect that, in his personal opinion, the establishment by Japanese troops of a suzerainty over Korea to the extent of requiring Korea to enter into no foreign treaties without the consent of Japan was a logical result of the present war and would directly contribute to permanent peace in the East..."

President Roosevelt concurred with Taft’s understanding in a telegram on July 31 1905:

"Your conversation with Count Katsura absolutely correct in every respect. Wish you would state to Katsura that I confirm every word you have said..."

Korea had traditionally been a tributary state and continued to be so under the influence of China's Qing Dynasty

Korea was a protectorate of China just like Japan is currently a protectorate of the US. However, China did not control Korea's interior affairs, foreign policies and did not station troops in Korea. And unlike Japan under the Protectorship of the US, China would send troops to Korea only upon request by the Korea government to help in its defense against the invader (usually Japan).

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

If Mr An is a criminal than the Japanese imperial government/army is the biggest criminal of all. Killing, murdering and raping millions of innocent Koreans, Chinese and Asians. Mr An is a hero.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

It doesn’t matter how the Japanese call Ahn Jung-Geun, a criminal or whatever. However, a high ranking politician in the ruling party of Japan calls its neighbor’s hero a criminal, it matters.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Ok, with this story in mind...

Why do Koreans and Chinese hate Japanese going to Yasukuni Shrine? Lol

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

CH3CHO: "So, you justify assassination to pursue political agenda."

I do not condone any assassination whatsoever, my friend, despite you probably believing people like Tojo were heroes despite their obvious war crimes. Given what happened after what Ahn tried to stop, though, it's pretty easy to understand why he's a hero to the people. I guess that good old George Washington was a terrorist, eh?

Meanwhile, you stand behind the idea that war criminals can be prayed for at Yasukuni and question (or deny) the sex-slave issue and Nanjing.

Sorry, bud, you defeat your own arguments.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

It doesn’t matter how the Japanese call Ahn Jung-Geun, a criminal or whatever. However, a high ranking politician in the ruling party of Japan calls its neighbor’s hero a criminal, it matters.

Sorry bud, by every objective standard this Ahn was a criminal and not a hero.

To qualify as criminal, he would have had to break his nation's law. Unless you wish to contend Korea in the 1905-1910 period sucked so much murder is not criminally illegal, at that point he is a criminal.

To qualify as a hero, at the very least his action should reasonably contribute to his cause. Killing a guy that's on the side of letting you off, even if only for the moment, is just not on.

To say he is a hero is similar to saying a Korean randomly killing Japanese during that time period was a hero, as long as somewhere in his skull he was supposedly thinking about Korea's freedom.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

smithinjapanNov. 20, 2013 - 07:40PM JST

I do not condone any assassination whatsoever,

smithinjapanNov. 20, 2013 - 04:19PM JST

whereas Ahn was an actual hero who tried to fight against colonial plans and the aggression that would be brought on by the IAJ.

I do not know how anyone can say these two at once.

As I repeatedly commented here and especially to you, I do not support Tojo or Yasukuni, and I do not deny comfort women or Battle of Nanjing. You seem to have cheap standard of yourself to portrait other commenters as if they are saying what they do not.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

German army officer Claus von Stauffenberg was honoured being a 'hero' in the world for his attempt to assassinate Hitler during world war II. Stuaffenberg wants to end WWII to save German people is exactly like Ahn Jung-Geun wants to save his people out of japanese occupation.But Ito Hirobumi was considered as a enemy combatant by many Koreans no matter his stance was moderate or harsh over the Colonial policy over Koreans. So being an assassin or a plot to assassinate some high profile leader was not totally a criminal act in regard of history! The japanese government just being too naive of history and wrongly accused activist Ahn Jung-Geun was a 'criminal' is definately inappropiate! But the controversy might risen as the subject itself is not a history matter but a political one when it involved China!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Just to make sure everyone has the correct understanding, Korea was annexed by Japan in 1910. The assassination was in 1909. Korea was not "occupied" by the Japanese.

His written statement for why he killed Ito was for the following 15 reasons.

Assassinating the Korean Empress Myeongseong Dethroning the Emperor Gojong Forcing 14 unequal treaties on Korea. Massacring innocent Koreans Usurping the authority of the Korean government by force Plundering Korean railroads, mines, forests, and rivers Forcing the use of Japanese banknotes Disbanding the Korean armed forces Obstructing the education of Koreans 10.Banning Koreans from studying abroad 11.Confiscating and burning Korean textbooks 12.Spreading a rumor around the world that Koreans wanted Japanese protection 13.Deceiving the Japanese Emperor by saying that the relationship between Korea and Japan was peaceful when in truth it was full of hostility and conflicts 14.Breaking the peace of Asia 15.Assassinating the Emperor Komei.

The assassination was after the Eulsa Treaty of 1905.

He was pro Japanese Emperor and pro pan-Asianist. He himself was quoted as saying "I have ventured to commit a serious crime, offering my life for my country. This is the behavior of a noble-minded patriot." after hearing that Ito had died.

A person who commits a serious crime is called, guess what, a CRIMINAL.

And when Japan annexed Korea, the Great Powers accepted it with no hesitation.

So apart from killing an unarmed old man, who was against annexation of Korea, what exactly did this man do that makes him a hero to the Korean people? Annexation took place, so he didn't stop anything, in fact the murder of Ito only accelerated the annexation process.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Everyone has to move on. They wont progress if they keep fighting over the past.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Well it's up to Korea if they want to honour Ahn Jung-Geun - one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter. It's a bit silly for Japan to protest and insist he was a criminal, and it would have been better to have said nothing. The biggest mischief maker in this is China. Sure, the event took place on Chinese soil but if Japan erected a statue of Chiang Kai-shek in Tokyo to celebrate the fact that this nationalist Chinese leader studied in Japan and had a long period of cordial relations I'm sure China would throw a hissy fit - like they do every time a world leader meets the Dalai Lama.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

If Ahn Jung-Geun is a criminal, then I guess President Truman and the US are bigger criminals too. Why don't the japanese call the Truman and the US officials responsible for the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, criminals also? Why doesn't Japan protest to US government, for honoring those who dropped the bombs as "mass murderers"? What's so different about this?

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Because the Japanese are still the same people as they were before the war. They have changed what they do and how they do it, but they are still the same people at heart. Give them the chance and they will repeat their actions that led to their part in WWII.

Why are comments like this not moderated? If I had said that about Germans I would have been blasted to the four winds. In fact, why are there so many bigoted comments like this allowed at all.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Kazuaki: "Sorry bud, by every objective standard this Ahn was a criminal and not a hero."

No, by every subjective standard. What's your stance on Tojo, by the way, just out of curiousity?

CH3CHO: "I do not know how anyone can say these two at once."

Yeah, it's tough to understand things for you guys when you cherry-pick comments and make your own links, but we are talking about people who like to rewrite history and make their own connections, so no surprise. The reality of it is, unfortunately for you, not quite the syllogism you paint it out to be. The man is a hero in South Korea, and now recognized as such in China -- do you debate that? I do not condone any murder, be it a 'first too kill 100 people for fun sword contest' or the execution of a man who has helped design colonization, inadvertently or not.

You seem to be pretty confused. But given the nature of the thread of the denial of facts by Japanese, or the lack of facts being taught to them, it's somewhat understandable.

Onsen: "Just to make sure everyone has the correct understanding, Korea was annexed by Japan in 1910. The assassination was in 1909. Korea was not "occupied" by the Japanese."

I think that's been made pretty clear.

"A person who commits a serious crime is called, guess what, a CRIMINAL."

Who's laws were they based upon is the better question, and against what was he fighting? On your next post I want you to admit all the crimes committed by Japanese Imperial soldiers, say they were wrong, why the class-A war criminals should be removed from Yasukuni, and that they should never be honored... then we'll get back to talking about Ahn. My guess is that, when it's Japan it's "different", isn't it'? ;)

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

It was only on paper that Korea was annexed in 1910. The reality was that Korea was already colonized by Japanese murdered the Korean queen, and bullied the Korean king - way before 1910. It was already a defacto colony with Japanese running amok all over Korea, doing the very things that you laid out on the list of Ahn's reasons why killed the Japanese official. To Koreans, even if they somehow knew he was a moderate, it didn't matter, all they cared was that their country was being invaded, and Hirobumi represented the government of Japan. And what did his assassination do for Korea? It unified the Koreans against Japan's tyranny.

Korea was annexed by Japan in 1910. The assassination was in 1909. Korea was not "occupied" by the Japanese.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Maybe China want Japan to revise japanese Constitution Article 9 so that Japan and Korea can fight each other? China forgot Japan already have brand new kind of weapon updating contract with USA next year but Korea didn;t? China can help N. Korea to invade and attack S. Korea? China must have analyzed that USA will stay away S. Korea war against Japan? S, Korea must be embarassed now. Chucky, You are just name caaling, ////////do you know Japanese people call General Mac b vut never gave any respectable title ot Truman? Japan lost war. You didn;t even know Tojo had verdict of A Class criminal and had death penalty.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

The cats are scratching in the sandbox again.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

toshiko, where am I name calling? Yes I did know Tojo was guilty of Class-A war crimes and got death penalty. He was tried and found guilty for war crimes against the Americans, British, etc, But none of the Japanese were ever tried for killing Koreans or Chinese, nor Koreans were allowed to even have any say or any input in getting any justice. My point was that most Japanese think Tojo and others were heroes of Japan, and honored as such. Why doesn't Japanese be brave enough to call Truman a criminal?

You are just name caaling, ////////do you know Japanese people call General Mac b vut never gave any respectable title ot Truman? Japan lost war. You didn;t even know Tojo had verdict of A Class criminal and had death penalty.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Some more facts.

Ito Hirobumi was not the current Resident-General for Korea at the time of his assassination on Oct 26, 1909. The Resident-General was Sone Arasuke who was sworn in on June 14, 1909.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Chucky wrote; chucky3176Nov. 20, 2013 - 08:31AM JST

If he's a criminal, then Tojo is a criminal, as well as the dead Emperor is
2 ( +4 / -2 )

if ahn is a hero, then is osama bin laden a freedom fighter? it all depends on your point of view. fact is since the '90s (which is relatively recent) china has been using japan to incite nationalism in order to hold the country together. both the china and korea seem to have an inferiority complex when it comes to japan. both have essentially copied japan's economic model. they always seem a step behind. perhaps by always focusing on the past, they hold themselves back?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Bad2DboneNov. 21, 2013 - 12:39AM JST

Way to go. Let's talk about "war criminals" shall we?

"The Spanish National Court has ordered arrest warrants to be issued against give Chinese leaders, including former President and Party Secretary Jiang Zemin, for their policies in Tibet. The ‘ground breaking’ development as the International Campaign for Tibet calls it, comes after former Chinese president Hu Jintao’s indictment for genocide last month. The court gave orders to inform Hu of the indictment and question him about his policies in Tibet through the Chinese Embassy in Madrid.

Legal experts in Spain believe the ruling is potentially as significant as the arrest of Pinochet in London in 1998 after a group of Spanish lawyers put together a lawsuit against the Chilean dictator, who presided over a 17-year reign of terror and ordered foreign assassinations.

The five Chinese leaders are Jiang Zemin, former President and Party Secretary; Li Peng, Prime Minister during the repression in Tibet in the late 1980s and early 1990s (and the crackdown in Tiananmen); Qiao Shi, former head of Chinese security and responsible for the People¹s Armed Police during the martial law period in Tibet in the late 1980s; Chen Kuiyuan, Party secretary in the Tibet Autonomous Region from 1992 to 2001 (who was known for his hardline position against Tibetan religion and culture), and Deng Delyun (also known as Peng Pelyun), minister of family planning in the 1990s.

The rulings today have positively surprised Spanish legal experts working on the Tibetan law suits upholding the principle of “universal jurisdiction” a part of international law that allows courts to reach beyond national borders in cases of torture, terror and other serious international crimes perpetrated by individuals, governments or military authorities.

Analysts also say that the ruling might dissuade the Chinese leaders to travel outside the PRC as they could be arrested for questioning on the crimes they are accused of. All the leaders face the possibility of their overseas bank accounts being frozen. "

http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?article=Spanish+court+orders+arrest+of+Chinese+leaders+including+Hu+Jintao&id=34249

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Hirohumi Ito was the first president of Japan and did not agree with the annexation with Korea. By killing him, the annexation was proceeded. And An stated several reasons to have murdered Ito. One is his foolish misunderstanding that Ito killed a grand child of Meiji Tennou emperor of Japan. Actually Ito didn't kill him. Namely he was a pro Japan. In North Korea An is just a criminal because he proceeded the annexation. Koreans don't know such historical fact and are praising a man as a symbol of anti-Japan. An is a man to be blamed for their standing point. Koreans are brainwashed by anti-Japan fabricated history. Ridiculous.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Well, based on the context of the time period involved, I'm not going to say that China and Korean officials honoring the 'assassin' is wrong.

But really, Chinese and South Korean officials need to grow up and stop with the incessant needling and harassment of all things Japan. Disputes over islands is one thing, quite another to distort history and consistently demonize Japan for the sake of these islands, among other things.

How ironic that the governments and nationalists of both China and Korea engage in the very same things they accuse Japan of doing, whitewashing history. Japan has atoned for its wartime past, something the anti Japan glosses over constantly.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

both sides are pathetic

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Japan had plan to annex Korea way before Ito went to Manchuria. Ahn Jong felt helpless I believe. Many Japanese felt sympathy and that was why there was no hell raised in Japan about Ito's assassination. Japan succeeded in colonized Japan later. There are many more stories about Japan's relationship with Mabchuria and Korea beside China. Until WW II was ended.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

chucky3176Nov. 20, 2013 - 10:09PM JST

If Ahn Jung-Geun is a criminal, then I guess President Truman and the US are bigger criminals too. Why don't the japanese call the Truman and the US officials responsible for the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, criminals also? Why doesn't Japan protest to US government, for honoring those who dropped the bombs as "mass murderers"? What's so different about this? ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Because Japan lost War and War crime court was operated by Winner, USA. Losers dp not have the right to protest war crimes.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Got to agree with Korea on this. Their country was being pressured to become occupied by a foreign force, and that foreign presence was eventually kicked out. People who gave their lives resisting the occupation should be honored. A losing country's "assassin" is a winning country's "freedom fighter". Japan should just let it go as they'll get no traction on this from their allies.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

FadamorNov. 21, 2013 - 05:54AM JST

Islamic extremists would be glad to hear your comment. That kind of view that condones assassination as a tool to achieve political goals is called terrorism.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Why don't the japanese call the Truman and the US officials responsible for the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, criminals also?

because they weren't

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Islamic extremists would be glad to hear your comment. That kind of view that condones assassination as a tool to achieve political goals is called terrorism.

i think u'r confusing urself between those who fight for freedom of the country in general and those who fight in the name of God/Allah. there is a distinction between political war and holy war - as religion (at least nowadays in most countries) is not considered part of the political life. mixing those can only create confusions like what u wrote. look at what the yasukuni shrine has been considered part of political life here - it only triggers anger and confusion outside.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

No, by every subjective standard. What's your stance on Tojo, by the way, just out of curiousity?

Oh, I'll agree he started some wars. However, the decision to start them really was not that out of the box aggressive by the standards of the time. And I find the entire concept of making up new laws like "waging aggressive war" and new doctrines like the "Nuremberg Defense" replacing the older (and frankly more reasonable) "Superior Orders" doctrine to provide a quasi-legal basis for execution is at best nothing more than cheap feel-good and at worst People Courtish...

Right and wrong in history should be left to historians rather than a lynch court. Heck, while "denial of the Rape of Nanking" may be virtually a Japan-only phenomenon, that the whole Nuremberg and Tokyo courts are less than perfectly fair is actually an international concept.

Who's laws were they based upon is the better question, and against what was he fighting?

I don't think there will be any laws that say that the killing of another person, in peacetime, is not criminal. If you say China / Korea in 1909 lacks these concepts, you will add validity to the Japanese claim that they are so primitive maybe they should have been conquered.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Well, it says that this guy was against the Korean annexation:

Itō's position, however, was nuanced. He was firmly against Korea falling into China or Russia's sphere of influence, which would cause a grave threat to Japan's national security. But, he was actually against the annexation, advocating instead that Korea should remain as a protectorate. When the cabinet eventually voted for annexing Korea, he insisted and proposed a delay, hoping that the annexation decision could be reversed in the future. His political nemesis came when the politically influential Imperial Japanese Army, led by Yamagata Aritomo, whose main faction was advocating annexation forced Itō to resign on 14 June 1909. His assassination is believed to have accelerated the path to the Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty.

He was overtaken by Yamagata Aritomo, who was a powerful militarist bureaucrat/politician who was much, much worse than this guy.

However, nationalists of either sides can shut up.

Kazuaki Shimazaki

However, the decision to start them really was not that out of the box aggressive by the standards of the time.

Yeah sure, and the Nazis weren't that aggressive by the standards of that time, and the Holocaust wasn't that bad, either. No. Stop making lame excuses.

Btw Tojo was nowhere near on the level of Hitler or Mussolini, etc. He was no dictator and he had no such supreme authority. Japan started wars left and right because the government could no longer control the out-of-control military factions.

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Sato HujkiNov. 21, 2013 - 12:57AM JST

Hirohumi Ito was the first president of Japan and did not agree with the annexation with Korea.

Did he disagree with annexation for the sake of Korea? No. In 1905, Korea already became a Japanese protectorate and Ito Hirobumi was a main figure in forcing Korea to sign the notoriously unfair Korea–Japan Protectorate Treaty.

"On 9 November 1905, Ito Hirobumi arrived in Seoul and gave a letter from the Emperor of Japan to Gojong, Emperor of Korea, asking him to sign the treaty. On 15 November 1905, he ordered Japanese troops to encircle the Korean imperial palace and threatened the emperor in order to force him to agree to the treaty. On 17 November 1905, Hasegawa and Ito entered the Jungmyeongjeon Hall, a European-style building that was once part of Deoksu Palace, to persuade Gojong to agree, but he refused. Ito pressured the cabinet with the implied, and later stated, threat of physical bodily harm, to sign the treaty.[6] According to 한계옥(Han-Gyeok), Korean Prime minister Han Gyu-seol disagreed, shouting loudly. Ito ordered the guards to lock him in a room and said if he continued screaming, they could kill him.[7] The Korean cabinet signed an agreement that had been prepared by Ito in the Jungmyeongjeon. The Agreement gave Japan complete responsibility for Korea’s foreign affairs, and placed all trade through Korean ports under Japanese supervision."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan%E2%80%93Korea_Treaty_of_1905

By killing him, the annexation was proceeded.

It sounds like you are trying to say Ahn’s assassination of Ito was the cause of Japan’s annexation of Korea, which is shameless. Annexing Korea was already decided in the Cabinet Decision(1909. 7. 6)before Ahn assassinated Ito. Ito Hirobumi opposed to annexation at first because he viewed keeping Korea as a protectorate would be enough in ruling Korea effectively. But,later he was not against it. He didn’t show any objection in Cabinet Decision to annex Korea. It can be said Ahn accelerated annexation, but it didn’t make a big difference.

Don’t mislead as if Ito was a good person to Korea just because he was once against annexing Korea. As an representative expansionist of Imperial Japan, his calculation was solely based on the interests of Japan.

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There was a Korean science fiction movie that started with the idea that the assassination was averted. That changed the local history to the extent that Japan didn't get into the Second World War and the story goes to the 1990s with Korea still being part of Japan and, of course, still trying to find a way to become non-Japanese.

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toshiko: "Maybe China want Japan to revise japanese Constitution Article 9 so that Japan and Korea can fight each other?"

You can't seriously be naive enough to believe Japan and SK would ever elevate to war beyond words. First and foremost, the US would never allow it. Second, Japan would be destroyed immediately if and when it happened, by superior forces. Hell, just go to the airports if you don't believe me -- in Japan there are old men, half nodding off and sitting in a corner, with six-shooters and who ride home or back to the office on rickety old bikes with a black metal box on the back. Go to South Korea and you see two young men (always in pair), walking around with automatics and fingers near the trigger. The young men of Korea have to join the army for 2.5 years or so (depending on field) mandatory training, whereas Japan is pacifist. I'm not saying one is better than that other at all; in fact, I'm agains the mandatory military training. But it's still fact SK is FAR more prepared and Japan would be dust if a war broke out.

Jerome: "That changed the local history to the extent that Japan didn't get into the Second World War and the story goes to the 1990s with Korea still being part of Japan and, of course, still trying to find a way to become non-Japanese."

Interesting. I saw a different movie where time travelers went back, one Korean and one a Japanese cop, the latter trying to prevent the assassination and the former making sure things occurred as the did in history. The end result was that the assassin succeeded and stopped the war (obviously not factual), and he was revered in museums across the country. The movie never faired well here.

Kazuaki: "Oh, I'll agree he started some wars. However,...."

That's where we say "bye-bye" to credibility... with the 'however'. "Yeah, sure... he started a few wars and had tens of millions across Asia killed, but heck...!"

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Suin KimNov. 21, 2013 - 02:30PM JST

"On 9 November 1905, Ito Hirobumi arrived in Seoul and gave a letter from the Emperor of Japan to Gojong, Emperor of Korea, asking him to sign the treaty. On 15 November 1905, he ordered Japanese troops to encircle the Korean imperial palace and threatened the emperor in order to force him to agree to the treaty. On 17 November 1905, Hasegawa and Ito entered the Jungmyeongjeon Hall, a European-style building that was once part of Deoksu Palace, to persuade Gojong to agree, but he refused. Ito pressured the cabinet with the implied, and later stated, threat of physical bodily harm, to sign the treaty.[6] According to (Han-Gyeok), Korean Prime minister Han Gyu-seol disagreed, shouting loudly. Ito ordered the guards to lock him in a room and said if he continued screaming, they could kill him.[7] The Korean cabinet signed an agreement that had been prepared by Ito in the Jungmyeongjeon.

I could not find anything reliable to confirm the description in Wikipedia. Han Gyeok's book was first published in 1998.

Between 2002 and 2005, based on an agreement by South Korean and Japanese Governments, Korea-Japan Joint History Study Committee made lots of research on various aspects of the history of the 2 nations. The committee made 3 papers on the validity of 1905 treaty.

http://www.jkcf.or.jp/projects/kaigi/history/first/1-3/

Korean professors raised numerous points that could possibly make the treaty invalid, but they did not raise such points like Ito physically forced or threatened the King or the Prime Minister to sign the treaty.

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CH3CHO: "Between 2002 and 2005, based on an agreement by South Korean and Japanese Governments, Korea-Japan Joint History Study Committee made lots of research on various aspects of the history of the 2 nations."

I've never understood this whole concept of joint research when Japan fairy-tales what actually happened. Will you admit Tojo was a criminal? My guess is no.

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Just to make sure everyone has the correct understanding, Korea was annexed by Japan in 1910. The assassination was in 1909. Korea was not "occupied" by the Japanese.

You obviously got the wrong info. Korea became a colony of Japan in 1895 after Japan won the 1894-1895 war of invasion. There is no doubt that Hirobumi Ito played a major role in the 1894-1895 invasion of Korea and China and the colonization of Korea in 1895.

If Korea wasn't a colony of Japan, how then could Japan kill any Korean that they disliked including the Empress of Korea in 1895:

"The assassination, which took place on Oct. 8, 1895, left its mark in history for its viciousness and brutality. The writer Fusako Tsunoda in her book on the murder wrote, "Everywhere there were cries, 'Where is Queen Min?' The assailants approached a group of court ladies who were trembling with fear and slaughtered two of them who were especially beautiful. One of the victims bore a faint trace of smallpox on her temple, allowing the assailants to verify that she was Queen Min." Tsunoda also said, "After many years, one of the assailants confessed that they violently slashed and committed unspeakable atrocities on the body of the empress."

Japan thoroughly covered up its responsibility. The empress' body was burned and Japanese government propaganda portrayed the assassination as the result of a power struggle between Myeongseong and her father-in-law Heungseon Daewongun."

Hirobumi Ito was the first president of Japan and did not agree with the annexation with Korea. By killing him, the annexation was proceeded.

Wrong. Even though Hirobumi Ito might be against the idea of publicly acknowledging the annexation of Korea by Japan out of fear of foreign interference especially opposition from Russia, he had always been an ardent supporter of annexation of Korea (in effect as opposed to on paper).

And the death of Hirobumi Ito in China wasn't the main factor that speeded up the paper annexation of Korea which was already in process before his death. What actually speeded up the paper annexation of Korea are Japan's defeat of Russia which opposed the annexation and US support in the Taft-Katsura agreement in 1905:

"Secretary Taft fully admitted the justness of the Count’s observations and remarked to the effect that, in his personal opinion, the establishment by Japanese troops of a suzerainty over Korea to the extent of requiring Korea to enter into no foreign treaties without the consent of Japan was a logical result of the present war and would directly contribute to permanent peace in the East..."

President Roosevelt concurred with Taft’s understanding in a telegram on July 31 1905:

"Your conversation with Count Katsura absolutely correct in every respect. Wish you would state to Katsura that I confirm every word you have said...""

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Communist Chinese leaders and S. Korean leader need to grow up and stop behaving like child.

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chucky, what do you know about Ahn? Maybe he wasn't so anti-Japanese as you might think. Maybe he just wanted a peaceful cooperation between Japan, Korea and China against Western European coutries like his late writings indicate? His son made an apology to the Ito's family in 1939 after he became a successful industrialist in, ekhm, occupied Korea where Koreans were opressed yet the son of Ahn made it big.

Did you know those facts or you just turned a blind eye just as general public opinion in South Korea?

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smithinjapanNov. 21, 2013 - 03:47PM JST

toshiko: "Maybe China want Japan to revise japanese Constitution Article 9 so that Japan and Korea can fight each other?"

You can't seriously be naive enough to believe Japan and SK would ever elevate to war beyond words. First and foremost, the US would never allow it. Second, Japan would be destroyed immediately if and when it happened, by superior forces ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,'

II wrote Maybe, Do these countries need USA permissions? Ahn assassinated when Koreans were helpless on Japan colonization, Too bad Japan and S. Korean tops did not have USA permission at his time.

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CH3CHONov. 21, 2013 - 04:56PM JST

I could not find anything reliable to confirm the description in Wikipedia. Han Gyeok's book was first published in 1998.

Are you ok with the rest ? Then, forget about the description from the book.

Han Gyu-seol later in 1930 said Ito forced him to sign, but he never signed and thus, he was locked in a room by the Japanese soldiers.

Korean professors raised numerous points that could possibly make the treaty invalid, but they did not raise such points like Ito physically forced or threatened the King or the Prime Minister to sign the treaty.

Encircling the Korean imperial palace by Japanese army definitely a threat. Read the book 「日韓協約と韓国併合ー朝鮮植民地支配の合法性を問う」 if you want to know how Ito militarily and verbally threatened King Gojong and Korean ministers. Forcing to sign with threat is definitely one of the reasons to make the treaty invalid.

"Following the end of the Russo-Japanese War and the signing of the Treaty of Portsmouth, in which Japan’s supremacy on the Korean peninsula was acknowledged by Russia, the Japanese statesman, Itō Hirobumi, presented Emperor Gojong with a draft of the Protectorate Treaty on 15 November, 1905. He declared the contents to be final and non-revisable and insisted that the Emperor and his ministers accept its terms. Faced with the disadvantage of having the Imperial palace occupied by Japanese Imperial Army troops, who were also deployed at strategic locations throughout the country, the Koreans were left with little alternative but to sign. The treaty was signed on 17 November, 1905, by the Korean minister of foreign affairs, Bak Je-sun, and the Japanese minister, Hayasi Konsuke. The Emperor Gojong and the Prime Minister, Han Gyu-seol refused to sign the treaty. “

http://www.conservapedia.com/Eulsa_Treaty

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Japanese plan of Colonization began in 1910. On 9 November 1905, Ito Hirobumi arrived in Seoul and gave a letter from the Emperor of Japan to Gojong, Emperor of Korea, asking him to sign the treaty. On 15 November 1905, he ordered Japanese troops to encircle the Korean imperial palace and threatened the emperor in order to force him to agree to the treaty.

On 17 November 1905, Hasegawa and Ito entered the Jungmyeongjeon Hall, a European-style building that was once part of Deoksu Palace, to persuade Gojong to agree, but he refused. Ito pressured the cabinet with the implied, and later stated, threat of physical bodily harm, to sign the treaty.[6] According to 한계옥(Han-Gyeok), Korean Prime minister Han Gyu-seol disagreed, shouting loudly. Ito ordered the guards to lock him in a room and said if he continued screaming, they could kill him.[7] The Korean cabinet signed an agreement that had been prepared by Ito in the Jungmyeongjeon. The Agreement gave Japan complete responsibility for Korea’s foreign affairs,[8] and placed all trade through Korean ports under Japanese This is a part of copy but too many stories/ There was a princess masako who was force to marry Princess of Korea. fortunately her husband loved her (Unlike Japanese maid-wife custom). So aftere WW II she wnet back to Korea and did charity work but never came back to Japan. The same with a noble lady who married to Manchuria Princess. She got help of Chinese PM Chu enlai and returned to Manchuria. Never returned to her noble family in Japan. Many Japanese read gossio magazines and theyknew Koreans were helpless. So, tthey ddidn';t blame assassination, After all Japan was harakiri and uchikubi contry before Meiji Ishin. Beside that, Ito was from Choshu, Other area people sympasized Korean disperate people than Ito. Even Chshu people coudn;t care less Ito. I quit here but my point is that He did what he thought to stop vicious colonializm, a majority of old Japanese thought.

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Really, who is shocked that the PRC is helping one of their tributary states build something to continue the hate?

News would be if the Korean nation actually started did something to promote civility with Japan.

But, if they did that Korea would have to face and accept it's own problems and who wants to do that when you can blame someone else?

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JoeBigsov. 22, 2013 - 06:06AM JST Really, who is shocked that the PRC is helping one of their tributary states build something to continue the hate?

South Korea no longer sees significant importance to Japan. The bilateral trade has reduced significantly. In the last ten years, Japan had fifty percent reduction in import from South Korea. Currently Japan exports $60 billion to SK, while SK exports $25 billion to Japan. It's a one way trade for Japan. Even Hyundai no longer sells cars in Japan. South Korea sees China as a future growth, and they will focus on increasing trade and improve their bilateral relations and cooperations.

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sfjp330Nov. 22, 2013 - 06:35AM JST "JoeBigsov. 22, 2013 - 06:06AM JST Really, who is shocked that the PRC is helping one of their tributary states build something to continue the hate?"

South Korea no longer sees significant importance to Japan. The bilateral trade has reduced significantly. In the last >ten years, Japan had fifty percent reduction in import from South Korea. Currently Japan exports $60 billion to SK, >while SK exports $25 billion to Japan. It's a one way trade for Japan. Even Hyundai no longer sells cars in Japan. >South Korea sees China as a future growth, and they will focus on increasing trade and improve their bilateral >relations and cooperations.

Very smart move cozying up to the one country that supports the only county that has continued to kill South Koreans for the last several decades.

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I still think China is instigating S. Korea to have war with Japan so that N. Korea can tale back S. Korea. USA will have big headache to figure if it will support S Korea or Japan. But more likely to back Japan because Japan buys US Military weapons and pay many billion dollars to let USA stay in military base. China can make N, Korea take S. Korea. Just my guess.

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Now, you can understand why the "apologies" from the Japan government have never been really accepted, and China and Korea don't let it go and move on. Keep doing controversial things will never make East Asia peaceful.

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sfjp330Nov. 22, 2013 - 06:35AM JST South Korea sees China as a future growth, and they will focus on increasing trade and improve their bilateral relations and cooperations.

Cozying up to a nation and covering up your own past atrocities are completely different.

In my book there is nothing wrong with Korea joining it's Northern brothers and making Kim their dear leader. Hell, I for one can't wait for that to happen, grass soup for all.

What gets me is Korea is hiding it's own dark history and trying to do so by promoting hatred of another nation.

This is a classic Napoleon syndrome but on a national scale.

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toshiko: "I still think China is instigating S. Korea to have war with Japan so that N. Korea can tale back S. Korea. USA will have big headache to figure if it will support S Korea or Japan."

Paranoia, and that's all.

JoeBigs: "What gets me is Korea is hiding it's own dark history and trying to do so by promoting hatred of another nation."

So it's okay for Japan to do it, but not SK. Shouldn't it be wrong for both to do it?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

A pro-Japanese emperor murders a anti-annexation Japanese official and he's a hero in Korea? Where is the logic in that?

The guy is just a delusional terrorist who was convicted of murder.

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smithinjapanNov. 22, 2013 - 08:13AM JST Paranoia, and that's all.

I believe that this has nothing to do with paranoia and everything to do with reality. If you step back and take a look at all that the PRC has done you will see a paint by numbers to push their cause. But, you can only see this if you are rational.

smithinjapanNov. 22, 2013 - 08:13AM JST So it's okay for Japan to do it, but not SK. Shouldn't it be wrong for both to do it?

So, please point out how many times Japanese school teachers have taken their kids to an anti-Korea rally.

I await your proof..

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@smithinotinjqpan: I prefet to be carefulParanoia than ignorantPretentiousstupid.

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JoeBigsNov. 22, 2013 - 08:01AM JST What gets me is Korea is hiding it's own dark history and trying to do so by promoting hatred of another nation.

This year over 160 Japan goverment representatives attended Yasukuni to pray for 14 class A war criminals and millions of IJA that was from dark history of 1931-45. I wonder who is still promoting hatred?

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sfjp330Nov. 22, 2013 - 09:35AM JST This year over 160 Japan goverment representatives attended Yasukuni to pray for 14 class A war criminals and >millions of IJA that was from dark history of 1931-45. I wonder who is still promoting hatred?

Nobody goes to pray for just 14 war criminals out of over 2,000,000. Furthermore, the only person who shot Tojo was a Japanese. It's this kind of fallacious allegation that promotes hatred.

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OssanAmericaNov. 22, 2013 - 09:59AM JST Nobody goes to pray for just 14 war criminals out of over 2,000,000. Furthermore, the only person who shot Tojo was a Japanese. It's this kind of fallacious allegation that promotes hatred.

If you remember, few year ago, two Japanese goverment officials visited Palisades Park, New Jersey, and they wanted local administrators to remove a small monument from a public park. The monument, a brass plaque on a block of stone, was dedicated in 2010 to the memory of so-called comfort women, tens of thousands of women and girls, many Korean and Chinese, who were forced into sexual slavery by Japanese soldiers during WWII. The Japanese authorities wanted Korean memorial removed. The consul general said the Japanese government was willing to plant cherry trees, donate books to the public library and do some things to show that we’re united in this world and not divided. But the offer was contingent on the memorial’s removal. The town officials rejected the request, and the delegation left.

The second delegation arrived few weeks later with four J-goverment reps. Their approach was less diplomatic. These Japanese politicians, tried and asked that the monument be removed, to convince the Palisades Park authorities that comfort women had never been forcibly conscripted as sex slaves. They said the comfort women were a lie, that they were set up by an outside agency, that they were women who were paid to come and take care of the troops. Downplaying of history still continues.

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Ossan: "Nobody goes to pray for just 14 war criminals out of over 2,000,000."

They still include the war criminals in their prayers, and if you think some don't consider them heroes and claim they were not criminals, you're kidding yourself.

sfjp: Didn't some of the delegates actually deface (or try to) the monument? Like I said in an earlier comment, whenever it's something that makes the Japanese look bad historically they demand it be taken down, etc.

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sfjp330Nov. 22, 2013 - 10:13AM JST The second delegation arrived few weeks later with four J-goverment reps. Their approach was less diplomatic. These >Japanese politicians, tried and asked that the monument be removed, to convince the Palisades Park authorities that >comfort women had never been forcibly conscripted as sex slaves. They said the comfort women were a lie, that they >were set up by an outside agency, that they were women who were paid to come and take care of the troops. >Downplaying of history still continues.

Thanks for bringing up a perfect example of Koreans working hard to perpetuate hatred. The US Army found that the comfort women were not forcibly conscripted as sex slaves from actual testimony. This is at a time when we were looking for anything that could be prosecuted at the War Crimes Trials. Koreans in the United States have no business bringing their own version of history to America's shores for the sole purpose of perpetuating hatred.

smithinjapanNov. 22, 2013 - 11:02AM JST Ossan: "Nobody goes to pray for just 14 war criminals out of over 2,000,000." They still include the war criminals in their prayers, and if you think some don't consider them heroes and claim they >were not criminals, you're kidding yourself.

If you think that the majority of the people who go to pray respects for 2,000,000 war dead from the late 1800s go to pay respects tor just 14 war criminals who brought Japan to ruin then it's you who is kidding himself. I repeat, the only person who ever shot a war criminal was a Japanese civilian.

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Suin KimNov. 22, 2013 - 12:47AM JST

Faced with the disadvantage of having the Imperial palace occupied by Japanese Imperial Army troops,

http://www.conservapedia.com/Eulsa_Treaty

Anyone would find difficulty discussing with Koreans on history. I asked where this allegation came from. You just give us the same copy paste. The discussion goes nowhere.

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Ossan: "Thanks for bringing up a perfect example of Koreans working hard to perpetuate hatred."

Says the guy who works so hard to perpetuate hatred towards Koreans -- even on unrelated threads! Sex slaves?? Nah, they were volunteers who made a lot of money, right, Ossan? War criminals prayed for?? nah, never... they have already been removed from the shrine and lawmakers never go visit. White-washing textbooks? Nah, never. Abe never bragged about removing 'comfort women' references, and they still exist to this day! And nah, no companies ever removed references to the forced suicides in Okinawa. Rescining apologies? nah, why would a Japanese politician ever do that? It's the KOREANS who are perpetuating hate, as you come on here so often to say, right?

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sfjp330Nov. 22, 2013 - 09:35AM JST This year over 160 Japan goverment representatives attended Yasukuni to pray for 14 class A war criminals and millions of IJA that was from dark history of 1931-45. I wonder who is still promoting hatred?

So you have proof of this claim? If so please back it up.

BTW, did you know that Mao killed a whole lot more Korean's and Chinese in his reign of terror, but you don't here the Japanese whining about that.

You guys have yet to answer my question, when was the last time that a Japanese teach brought his/her students to an anti-Korea rally?

Smith are you going to answer the question or are you going to continue to use 1940's excuses?

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All readers back on topic and please stop bickering.

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CH3CHONov. 22, 2013 - 12:39PM JST

I told you to read 「日韓協約と韓国併合ー朝鮮植民地支配の合法性を問う」. If you truly want to know the truth, read 「伊藤博文韓国奉使記事摘要」 and 「朝鮮最近史」(1935). The former is Ito Hirobumi’s report to the Emperor after signing the Treaty and the latter is a memoirs of Hayashi Gonsuke who signed the Treaty. Those books describe in detail how Ito threatened King Gojong and Korean ministers.

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Japanese plan of Colonization began in 1910. On 9 November 1905, Ito Hirobumi arrived in Seoul and gave a letter from the Emperor of Japan to Gojong, Emperor of Korea, asking him to sign the treaty. On 15 November 1905, he ordered Japanese troops to encircle the Korean imperial palace and threatened the emperor in order to force him to agree to the treaty.

Not really understanding what I'm reading here... If Japan's colonization plans didn't start until 1910, why are there enough Japanese troops in Korea on 15 November of 1905 to be ordered to "encircle the Korean Imperial Palace"? Sounds to me like the colonization had already been well underway five years before it supposedly started..

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If he's a criminal, then Tojo is a criminal...

Tojo was hanged as a criminal, so I guess you have your answer. I don't see anybody in Japan putting up statues for the goons who killed Koreans during the occupation. If Ahn had been a rebel leader or something like than then a statue might be in order. But a statue to a guy who shot another person at a train station? Seems a little over the top.

At the same time Japan ought to just ignore such antics as the immature response of governments that really aren't all that upstanding. Take the high road.

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Here is a copy (not my opinion() As Resident-General of Korea[edit] Prince Itō and the Crown Prince of Korea Yi Un. In November 1905, following the Russo-Japanese War, Japan–Korea Treaty of 1905 was made between the Empire of Japan and the Empire of Korea, making Korea a Japanese protectorate. After the treaty had been signed, Itō became the first Resident-General of Korea on 21 December 1905. In 1907, he urged Emperor Gojong to abdicate in favor of his son Sunjong and secured the Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty of 1907, giving Japan its authorities to control Korea's internal affairs. Itō's position, however, was nuanced. He was firmly against Korea falling into China or Russia's sphere of influence, which would cause a grave threat to Japan's national security. But, he was actually against the annexation, advocating instead that Korea should remain as a protectorate. When the cabinet eventually voted for annexing Korea, he insisted and proposed a delay, hoping that the annexation decision could be reversed in the future. His political nemesis came when the politically influential Imperial Japanese Army, led by Yamagata Aritomo, whose main faction was advocating annexation forced Itō to resign on 14 June 1909. His assassination is believed to have accelerated the path to the Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty

Assassination Itō arrived at the Harbin Railway Station on 26 October 1909 for a meeting with Vladimir Kokovtsov, a Russian representative in Manchuria. When he arrived and proceeded to meet his Russian colleague, An Jung-geun, a Korean nationalist and independence activist fired six shots at him. Three of those shots hit Itō in the chest and he died shortly thereafter.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

IMy thinking is that Ito should not try to mess around Korean Emperor's private life whether he meant well or not. It is not a foreigner;s business, Maybe many of you will oppose my opinion, I always wondered why old Yamaguchi-ken people did not moan this assassination. I used to think people still had mentality of traditional harakiri time. until Suin Kim opened up my eyes here. Nothing wrong old woman learn something new, I believe.

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Gonsuke who signed the Treaty. Those books describe in detail how Ito threatened King Gojong and Korean ministermemoirs of Hayashi s

It's a 433 pg book that's out of circulation. Perhaps you could cite the page number and the passage in this book.

I have a better one.

http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/article.aspx?aid=1918648

"Before we pitched the net, a fish jumped into the net," said Midori Komatsu, who was the foreign affairs director at the Office of the Japanese Resident General in Korea, recollecting the eve of the Japanese annexation of Korea in August 1910. His remarks are sinking deep into our minds, and we again confirm that 91 years ago we surrendered our country to the Japanese colonial government due to our hopeless ineptitude. On Aug. 29, 1910, the imperial government of Japan promulgated that it had taken over the entire government and administration of Korea, and Wednesday was the anniversary of the national humiliation. In studying this history, let us find out who chased the fish - annexation - into the net. Choson, or Korea, suggested annexation to Japan first. Lee Ik-jik was a secret envoy of Prime Minister Lee Wan-yong......

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Correction:

Hayashi Gonsuke 's memoirs is 「わが七十年を語る」, not 「朝鮮最近史」.

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Yes. Suin Kim

It's still a 433 page book that's out of circulation. I'd appreciated If you could refer to the page number and the exact passage that supports your argument.

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You people made me interested in Colonian time Korea. Short Cut, I lam reading Korea under Japanese colony ( this title may differ).

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Come on folks let's be realistic, this nationalistic movement by the South is just it's way of preparing it's people with reunification with the north.

The only way that this reunification will work is if the north can keep it's leadership in place and the south is willing to do this.

So, the south has to ensure that the people have a big bad boogieman they can hate and who better than the nation that ruled them for 35 years?

I for one can't wait to see this happen.

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Japan is stupid for NOT admitting it was wrong and EVIL during World War 2!!!South Korea and China also need to move on, grow up!!China has way more important things to worry about that supporting South Korea in this lame propaganda attempt!!We should not spend $$$ on trips to countries like South Korea and China!! They wanna be like babies crying forever?????

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I think the point is that Japan needs to acknowledge its status and state as an East Asian nation and to do so, it must come to terms with its post-Meiji history in East Asia.

The key factor is the rise of China; by the end of the year, the Chinese economy will be twice the size of the Japanese economy, and by the end of the decade, the Chinese will be on par with the United States as a major economy.

The Chinese, for better or for worse, are historians in their blood; whereas in other countries myth and folklore may take up the space of tradition, for the Chinese, they talk about events that have occurred more than 2000 years ago as though they happened yesterday. The Chinese are probably psychologically incapable of forgetting slights that occurred even 150 years back, and will not indulge the Japanese on this affair.

Japan, as an aging country with an increasing debt load and economic stagnancy (Taiwan overtook Japan in PPP GDP per capita in the past few years) cannot play a decisive role in the region, and ultimately needs to come to terms with its past and integrate with its neighbors.

This can be done through either peaceful or violent means; I'm not suggesting that China will end up trying to conquer Okinawa or land troops on Honshu, but Japan has a history of making rapid about faces when the superiority of its enemies is evident; as Ruth Benedict mentioned, this is one of Japan's strengths. When the Yamato expedition to sake Baekje was destroyed by a combined Tang-Silla force, Japan began studying Chinese culture and civilization to learn the secrets of their strength. When the Europeans made evident their military superiority in the Anglo-Satsuma Wars and other small wars before the fall of the Shogunate, the Japanese restored the Emperor and began learning the secrets of Western industrial civilization to save itself. When the Americans nuked Japan at the end of World War II, Japan accepted Americanization in order to rebuild and rejoin the ranks of the leading nations.

The problem is whether it's necessary for Japan to receive yet another show of force. Japan, to some degree, thinks itself the superior of its neighbors, with some justification; the Chinese lack craft, art, and discipline, while the Koreans are lacking in high-culture. They have their own different virtues, but they're not apparent to the Japanese. And Japan was never properly defeated by either the Chinese or the Koreans; on the continent, Japanese troops reliably defeated both Communist and Nationalist forces even into the closing months of the war, and while the Allies were planning to perform amphibious landings of Nationalist forces onto Honshu, the nuclear attacks on Japan removed the necessity. Were the Nationalists transported into Japan to be given their own opportunity to commit atrocities, like the Red Army getting their own back as they advanced into Germany, we wouldn't be in this position.

However, By 2030, East-Asian relations will be markedly improved, with a better understanding of history on all sides, more mutual respect on all sides, and an end of long-term enmity in the region. The question is what happens around the 2020 timeframe; will Tang and Silla again act to defeat Yamato, or would all parties peaceably back down and extend their humanity?

As to the Ito incident; the Koreans are being creative in their resolution of long-standing issues. The Koreans and Chinese dislike Japan over its past actions, but what really upsets them is that Japan will not admit to it and will not achieve a consensus on its past history of imperialism. What upsets them more than comfort women is when Japanese politicians try to explain it away or deny it without being punished by their electorate, what upsets them more than the Nanjing Massacre is when the Japanese political organs try to whitewash it. By celebrating a nationalist Korean terrorist, they are sticking the finger back to the Japanese and letting the Japanese understand how the Chinese and Koreans feel about the Japanese right. In the same way, there are plans for an atomic bomb museum by the Chinese and Koreans, that celebrates the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

It's a step forward; in that by giving the Japanese grievances against the Chinese and Koreans, there becomes something for the Chinese and Koreans to trade away in negotiations.

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And well, if you say that the Chinese and Koreans are children for not being able to forget the events of a hundred years earlier; in East Asia, we have a higher incidence of long MAOA genes, which scientific research claims disposes us to violence. But amazingly enough, in East Asia, we all tend to have a high level of civilization; while there are places where people tend towards uncivilized behavior, we're not like the Americans, who have a culture of violence and think it's acceptable to settle things like cowboys.

What recent research is showing, rather, is that MAOA is not actually a violence gene per se, but rather a justice gene; which incites its carriers to hold onto long grudges. It is part of the orderliness of our societies; in that we know that a crime committed decades ago will not go unavenged, so it's better off not to commit the crime in the first place. While the legacy of Japanese imperialism need not be settled with violence; it ultimately must be settled.

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About Ito himself; well, the 四十七士 were criminals, right? Simply because an action is illegal does not make it wrong; there is no incompatibility between Ahn being both a criminal and a hero. The Japanese of all people should understand that better than anyone else; their national epic is the tale of illegal revenge by the retainers of a lord, who, if you consider the full story, was definitely in the wrong; he was too impulsive and too unwise to avoid being forced to commit seppuku. It was a completely pointless action; which is why you venerate the 誠 of the ro-nin, whose actions ultimately resulted in their deaths. And like the 47 Ro-nin, Ahn turned himself in to authorities and was ultimately executed.

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By celebrating a nationalist Korean terrorist

But Suga only stated that he's a "criminal" and yet Korean government is going ape$hit.

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Japan people have now been largely "brain-washed" by the government and politician. Many of them do not know the true history. German truly reflected all the things but not Japanese. Because of notorious invasion which created unforgettable traumatic experience to Asian people, Asian people can hardly forget that and also to be alert for Japan military force (next invasion?) If Japan continue to do things like now, Japan definitely is preparing to bring East Asia instability!

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Watch this 7-min video on Ahn Jung Guen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IWNQJ5IZQY

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Thanks for the link, Farmer21.

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Before 1910, Japan already had Korea as its protecttionate. Then, Japan as its colony. Ito was against colonialization but he was a biggest politician in Japan then, This is only my analysis so any of you can have different opinion and.or analysis to differ me and feather and tar me. Japanese other politicians then wanted Other countries to recognize Japanese position of Korea. So, Japan just used colony so that EU which had colonies all ove SE Asia will recognize Japanese way of seizing Korea accepted by BK, Dutch.,Spain, and some more.

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Very poor choice of words by Suga. One country's criminal is another country's freedom fighter. Some conservative whites have been known to label Nelson Mandela as a criminal or terrorist; well, he was fighting against a white-minority terrorist government in South Africa. Sometimes you have to fight fire with fire. Not everybody was going to succeed by mimicking Mahatma Gandhi and his civil disobedience tactics.

This episode involving Suga shows yet again that conservative, elitist Japanese politicians--despite talking ad nauseam about how their country "liberated" Southeast Asia from Western colonial rule during World War II--just don't understand the sensitivities of people in formerly colonized countries, a group of countries that obviously includes South Korea. And yes, I know that some pro-Japan types like calling Korea the "Austria of Asia"--implying that Koreans were willing and complicit partners in Japanese imperialism--but I don't buy that. And curiously enough, those who repeatedly call Korea the "Austria of Asia" seem awfully reluctant to take that logic one step further and call Japan the "Nazi Germany of Asia." I wonder why...

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When he called Anh a "criminal", he showed his true color, i.e. he identifies with those imperialists. It is as if he is calling Hitler's assassin a criminal.

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MASSWIPENov. 24, 2013 - 12:23AM JST And yes, I know that some pro-Japan types like calling Korea the "Austria of Asia"--implying that Koreans were willing >and complicit partners in Japanese imperialism--but I don't buy that. And curiously enough, those who repeatedly call >Korea the "Austria of Asia" seem awfully reluctant to take that logic one step further and call Japan the "Nazi Germany >of Asia." I wonder why...

You shouldn't buy anything until you actually look at the facts. Many anti-J Koreans claim that all the Koreans who served in the Imperial Japanese Military from 1910 to 1945 were coerced or forced to serve against their will. This is not true. Japan and Korea started a volunteer military system in 1938.Korean military participation ★1939 Applicants 12,348 Accepted 613 ★1940 Applicants 84,443 Accepted 3,060 ★1941 Applicants 144,743 Accepted 3,208 ★1942 Applicants 254,273 Accepted 4,077 ★1943 Applicants 303,294 Accepted 6,300 Some claim that all Koreans were always low ranking soldiers under the command of Japanese officers. This is also not true. , the following Korean commanders in Japanese Imperial Army contributed great service of Japan and Korea. ★Lee Byung-Mu 李秉武 Lieutenant General of IJA in 1920 ★Cho Dong-yoon 趙東潤 Lt.Gen. in 1920 ★Lee Hee-doo 李煕斗 Major General in 1920 ★Cho Sung-Geun 趙性根 Lt.Gen. in 1928 ★Eo Dam 魚潭 Lt.Gen. in 1930 ★Wang Yoo-Shik 王瑜植 Maj.Gen. in 1925 ★Kim Eung-Sung 金応善 Maj.Gen. in 1931 Korean guards especially in the Phillipines where notorious for brutality towards Allied POWs and a number of them were charged and convicted as class B and C War Criminals. There is no doubt that anti-Japan faction and movement existed but a faction which played a role as part of the Japanese Empire also existed. The Father of of the current South Korean President was an officer in the IJA, the notorious Kwantung Army no less. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Park_Japan.JPG What people mean by callig Skouth Korea the Austria of Asia is that immediately upon Japan's surrender to the allies the South Koreans went into denial of their role ion WWII and have worked to create an image that they were "invaded" by Japan like the rest of Asia. This is incorrect as Korea was annexed,. not invaded, and Koreans as members of the Japanese military invaded other Asian countries. While South Koreans honoring Ahn Jung-Geun as a hero is to be expected in light of South Korea's anti-Japan policy, that China should throw it's weight behind it, and South Korea's obliviousness to the fact that China supports North Korea which constantly kills South Koreans here and there defies rationale.

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hikkifan17, Ito H was also a war criminal, he started the war with China and invaded Korean that killed more than thousands.......

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I knew Korean people had no choice but to obey Japanese military.wish. Japanese Army had to use brillinant and talented Korean officers in order to coerce Korean soldiers. Japanese officers could not speak Korean language.

Following is only copy.

Starting in 1938, Koreans both enlisted and were conscripted into the Japanese military and the first "Korean Voluntary" Unit was formed. Among notable Korean personnel in the Imperial Army was Crown Prince Euimin, who attained the rank of lieutenant general. Some later gained administrative posts in the government of South Korea; well-known examples include Park Chung Hee, who became president of South Korea, Chung Il-Kwon (정일권,丁一權), prime minister from 1964 to 1970, and Paik Sun-Yup, South Korea's youngest general, famous for his defense of the Pusan Perimeter during the Korean War. The first ten of the Chiefs of Army Staff of South Korea graduated from the Imperial Japanese Army Academy and none from the Korean Liberation Army

Recruitment began as early as 1938, when the Japanese Kwantung Army in Manchuria began accepting pro-Japanese Korean volunteers into the army of Manchukuo, and formed the Gando Special Force. Koreans in this unit specialized in counter-insurgency operations against communist guerillas in the region of Jiandao. The size of the unit grew considerably at an annual rate of 700 men, and included such notable Koreans as General Paik Sun-Yup, who served in the Korean War. Historian Philip Jowett noted that during the Japanese occupation of Manchuria, the Gando Special Force "earned a reputation for brutality and was reported to have laid waste to large areas which came under its rule.

Starting in 1944, Japan started conscription of Koreans into the armed forces. All Korean males were drafted to either join the Imperial Japanese Army, as of April 1944, or work in the military industrial sector, as of September 1944. Before 1944, 18,000 Koreans passed the examination for induction into the army. Koreans provided workers to mines and construction sites around Japan. The number of conscripted Koreans reached its peak in 1944 in preparation for war From 1944, about 200,000 Korean males were inducted into the army.

During World War II, American soldiers frequently encountered Korean soldiers within the ranks of the Imperial Japanese Army. Most notably was in the Battle of Tarawa, which was considered during that time to be one of the bloodiest battles in U.S. military history. A fifth of the Japanese garrison during this battle consisted of Korean laborers who were trained in combat roles. Like their Japanese counterparts, they put up a ferocious defense and fought to the death.

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Government doesn't really care about some dude that died a century ago what do they care is what pull that dude have in history,with people and what benefit does it have to them,they do what they must to remain functional and keep the people well put in their place even if they have to put on a bit of farces among each other .

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Very poor choice of words by Suga. One country's criminal is another country's freedom fighter. Some conservative whites have been known to label Nelson Mandela as a criminal or terrorist; well, he was fighting against a white-minority terrorist government in South Africa. Sometimes you have to fight fire with fire. Not everybody was going to succeed by mimicking Mahatma Gandhi and his civil disobedience tactics.

He was asked by the media so he answered. But let's be real. Most of Ahn list of reasons why he killed Ito had virtually nothing to do with him. The assasination did not result in the public uprising but instead facilitated the annexation much faster which is described as "Before we pitched the net, a fish jumped into the net". Not only that, Ito was leading the pack againt annexation and even during protecterate state, he hoped Korea would modernize like the West so that they would be independent.

To put it mildly, the guy was a delusional terrorist. Calling him a "criminal" is an upgrade.

This episode involving Suga shows yet again that conservative, elitist Japanese politicians--despite talking ad nauseam about how their country "liberated" Southeast Asia from Western colonial rule during World War II--just don't understand the sensitivities of people in formerly colonized countries, a group of countries that obviously includes South Korea. And yes, I know that some pro-Japan types like calling Korea the "Austria of Asia"--implying that Koreans were willing and complicit partners in Japanese imperialism--but I don't buy that. And curiously enough, those who repeatedly call Korea the "Austria of Asia" seem awfully reluctant to take that logic one step further and call Japan the "Nazi Germany of Asia." I wonder why...

Lawmakers do not talk "ad nauseum" about history. They'll comment on it when asked and it's the media that cherry picks a phrase and distorts the headlines to create controversy. And as to Austria's comparison, it's only brought up when anti-J bashers bring up the lame Germany comparison over and over again so there is already a "Nazi Germany of Asia" implied.

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It's still a 433 page book that's out of circulation. I'd appreciated If you could refer to the page number and the exact passage that supports your argument.

I read it in Korean and translated the related part into English here. Sorry about my poor translation, but I think there’s no problem in conveying the meaning.

Finally as planned in advance, Ito公 arrived in Seoul one week later. I ordered to get ready for the case to ask Ito公 to attend the meeting when the negotiation I lead goes smoothly. But there was a possibility we could’t draw the conclusion in the morning. In that case, it was likely we proceed in front of the Emperor(Gojong) after lunch. Of course, I’ll go there, too if that happens. Depending on how the negotiation proceeds, Ito公 should be there for sure. Of coures, I made an prior arrangement to contact in that case.

Another prior preparation was asking General Hasegawa(長谷天) for stake out of reconnaissance. Each minister would be convened to legation according to a prearranged plan, but since the subject for meeting is grave for Korea, it’s certain the ministers naturally try to dodge. Therefore, it was certain some ministers will flee on the way to the palace from legation. To prevent this, some MPs were convened in advance to watch them not to flee. Of course, nominally, it’s under the pretext of escort.

The next matter was the Seal of Korean King. I sent a person to watch the officer who is in charge of the Seal from the early morning. There was one more thing to ask General Hasegawa. In fact, it didn't matter, but it was possible one or two ministers would commit a suicide when the treaty is finally signed. Personally, I didn't t take it serious, but I throughly made a prior arrangement to prevent this happening.

Thus, all preparations were done after discussion with Ito公 and the next day each minister was convened to the office of legation.The meeting started early in the morning, but the conclusion was not drawn during the morning as expected. Besides, all ministers looked embarrassed. As I imagined, because it was too grave to be decided by only ministers, there was no other choice but to listen to the King’s opinion.

Next was finally a plenary session in front of the King and all ministers gathered in Palace. Judging there was need to check constantly, I put my subordinates here and there because of any possible attempt during this session. In the late evening, I was informed the King sent the keeper of the Palace to Ito公 to ask him to postpone the ongoing matter in Palace for 2 or 3 days. Thinking this is the right moment Ito公 appears in the meeting, I sent Sitehara君 to bring Ito公 over.

Since it was pre-planned, Ito公 promptly came to the meeting place in the Palace. Ito公 came being accompanied by General Hasegawa and escorted by MPs and asked each minister yes or no. Three ministers said no and the rest said yes. Especially, Korean Prime Minister Ha Gyu-seol acted suspiciously. He was so outraged and he got out of the place and headed for King. He showed the spirit to prevent the decision by all means. ....(The following part can be summarized like this. On the way to King, he mistakenly entered into the Queen’s room. After all the fuss, he lost all energy and fainted in the front of the meeting room. Hayashi instructed to pour cold water over his head.)

Thus, the conclusion could be drawn to some degree in the absence of the Prime Minister.

According to 「韓末外交秘話」(1930) by Nishiyosusugi Kintaka (西四辻公堯 ) who was in the meeting, Ito yell to the Korean ministers “Anyone who complains will be killed.”. In Japan, it’s controversial on whether it’s true he was on the spot.

Han Gyu-seol wrote in his memoir(1930) that Pak Je-soon the Minister of Foreign Affairs said he would commit a suicide rather be deprived of the Seal of King before the meeting but he handed it over after all. Han was expelled after the Treaty for the reason he was misbehaved.

Nigelboy , 「わが七十年を語る」 is available in Amazon and some university libraries in Japan. If you have a chance to read this book, please check my translation.

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Suin Kim

Very informative. Thanks for all your work.

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Suga and Japanese politicians has to say :No Comment" when media ask their opinion, "Ato-de Happyoita shimasu:. or "Ao-de ohanashi itashimasu:".

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I think J government is trying to make a point to them that history looks different from the other side.

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China and South Korea are to cooperate on a memorial to a Korean national hero who assassinated a Japanese official a century ago,

This will teach you what instills pride in some nations.

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Why do people not know that THIS GUY is directly responsible for the political decision making that DIRECTLY lead to Korea being colonized? Holy crap, the irony is just plain insane.

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Suin KimNov. 24, 2013 - 11:30AM JST

Thank you.

Where in your translation does it say that Ito ordered Japanese troops to encircle the Korean imperial palace or that Ito threatened or physically coerced the Korean King or the Korean Ministers to sign the treaty? Rather, your translation shows that the Korean Ministers had freedom to say no to the treaty and 3 of them actually said no.

Ito came being accompanied by General Hasegawa and escorted by MPs and asked each minister yes or no. Three ministers said no and the rest said yes.

I understand Koreans do not like the 1905 Treaty, but that does not mean Koreans can tell false history of the treaty.

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I pitty Korean citizens that they are totally controled toward unexisted history...even histry is only one. And not only history, products, company, anything they say is wrong. When I talk to Korean about anything, I always care about threir ignorance. They 100% say wrong information. I know, to teach truth is significant for such a person, but they cannot accept out of Korean infomation unfortunately. Just pitful people because of the Korean government.

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nigelboy at Nov. 24, 2013 - 08:52AM JST

Most of Ahn list of reasons why he killed Ito had virtually nothing to do with him.... Not only that, Ito was leading the pack againt annexation and even during protecterate state, he hoped Korea would modernize like the West so that they would be independent.

Do you know how many of Ahn’s reasons to assassinate Ito have nothing to do with Ito? Can you explain why Ito was against annexation of Korea and he hoped Korea to be modernized with any source supporting your claim?

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Do you know how many of Ahn’s reasons to assassinate Ito have nothing to do with Ito? Can you explain why Ito was against annexation of Korea and he hoped Korea to be modernized with any source supporting your claim?

http://sankei.jp.msn.com/life/news/131120/art13112003100001-n1.htm

This poped out recently where Nazo Nitobei who served as an ambassador to League of Nations was asked by ministry friend to convince Ito to move forward with the annexation. Nazo told Ito in Seoul, "Can Koreans themselves operate their this country?" Ito's response was "Nazo, Koreans are great people. There is no reason why they can't operate on their own."

Of course, another memo written by Ito dated November of 1905 surfaced from his relatives stated

韓国の富強の実を認むるに至る迄- Until a powerful and rich Korea is estabished

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One man's saint is always another's devil. And in this world seems that right and wrong always have a context.

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CH3CHONov. 25, 2013 - 09:27AM JST

Before demanding, why don’t you read the books I recommended first.? When I have time, I translate 『伊藤博文韓国奉使記事摘要』 to show how Ito threatened Emperor Gojong.

I understand Koreans do not like the 1905 Treaty, but that does not mean Koreans can tell false history of the treaty.

false history of the treaty? You’ll never accept the true history of the treaty as long as you turn a blind eye to the ugly side of history of Imperial Japan.

The following is from “The Tragedy of Korea”(1908) by F. A. McKenzie British Far Eastern correspondent for Daily Mail.

"On the 17th of November, another conference began at two in the afternoon at the Legation, but equally without result. Mr. Hayashi then advised the Ministers to go to the palace and open a Cabinet Meeting in the presence of the Emperor. This was done, the Japanese joining in.

All this time the Japanese Army had been making a great display of military force around the palace. All the Japanese troops in the district had been for days parading the streets and open places fronting the Imperial residence. The field-guns were out, and the men were fully armed. They marched, counter-marched, stormed, made feint attacks, occupied the gates, put their guns in position, and did everything, short of actual violence, that they could to demonstrate to the Koreans that they were able to enforce their demands. To the Cabinet Ministers themselves, and to the Emperor, all this display had a sinister and terrible meaning. They could not forget the night in 1895, when the Japanese soldiers had paraded around another palace, "

"That evening Japanese soldiers, with fixed bayonets, entered the courtyard of the palace and stood near the apartment of the Emperor. Marquis Ito now arrived, accompanied by General Hasegawa, Com- mander of the Japanese army in Korea, and a fresh attack was started on the Cabinet Ministers. The Marquis demanded an audience of the Emperor. "

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I suppose the statue of An at Namsan isn't sufficient, so a newer / larger version is required?

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It is sickening to witness Japanese Officials protesting the memorial of a hero and branding Ahn as criminal when the real Criminal was Ito who rose to power by securing the Japan's prosperity by murdering millions of Korean and Chinese people for resources Japan craved. ITO was nothing more than a two bit bandit who took advantage of Countries that didn't catch up with modern weaponry and battle tactics while the Imperial Army was armed with modern repeating rifles and Gatling Guns...

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Extreme nationalism is ridiculous and dangerous whichever country you are affiliated to. Such thinking and activities only serve to keep politicians in office (on both sides), provide cover for violence that primarily hurts the most vulnerable in society and funds weapons manufacturers and other war profiteers. People need to grow up.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Suin KimNov. 25, 2013 - 07:55PM JST

Discussion with Koreans would go nowhere.

Where in your quote does it say that Ito ordered Japanese troops to encircle the Korean imperial palace or that Ito threatened or physically coerced the Korean King or the Korean Ministers to sign the treaty?

That evening Japanese soldiers, with fixed bayonets, entered the courtyard of the palace and stood near the apartment of the Emperor. Marquis Ito now arrived, accompanied by General Hasegawa, Com- mander of the Japanese army in Korea, and a fresh attack was started on the Cabinet Ministers.

Of course Ito needed body guards in a palace where assassination is common place.

You also know that the Japanese draft of 1905 treaty was altered at the demand of Koreans, meaning the negotiation was not one sided.

I understand Koreans do not like the 1905 Treaty, but that does not mean Koreans can tell false history of the treaty.

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Conquest of another nation's territory is criminal. Given the concerns over the Senkakus, Japan can more easily recognize this as true and more easily empathize with their neighbors. But then, it is not very likeable when historical salt is thrown at current-gen Japan for the sins of men two generations back. Likely, SK and China are doing it for nationalism, solidarity and market shares, but that is like doing something bad to gain good which is the practical definition of a pathology.

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CH3CHO at Nov. 26, 2013 - 10:45AM JST

Of course Ito needed body guards in a palace where assassination is common place.

If you call them Ito’s body guards, Japanese soldiers were there with fixed bayonets to threaten Koreans under the pretext of protecting Ito. Read what Hayashi wrote again. There's no any clue it was not one-sided. Mr. McKENZIE wrote:

"The presence of the soldiers, the gleaming of the bayonets outside, the harsh words of command that could be heard through the windows of the palace buildings, were not without their effect. The Ministers had fought for days and they had fought alone. No single foreign representative had offered them help or counsel. They saw submission or destruction before them. " What is the use of our resisting ? " said one. " The Japanese always get their way in the end." Signs of yielding began to appear. The acting Prime Minister, Han Kew Sul, jumped to his feet and said he would go and tell the Emperor of the talk of traitors. Han Kew Sul was allowed to leave the room and then was gripped by the Japanese Secretary of the Legation, thrown into a side-room and threatened with death. Even Marquis Ito went out to him to persuade him. " Would you not yield/' the Marquis said, " if your Emperor commanded you ? " " No," said Han Kew Sul, " not even then !"

"Meanwhile the remaining Ministers waited in the Cabinet Chamber. Where was their leader, the man who had urged them all to resist to death ? Minute after minute passed, and still he did not return. Then a whisper went round that the Japanese had killed him. The harsh voices of the Japanese grew still more strident. Courtesy and restraint were thrown off. " Agree with us and be rich, or oppose us and perish." Pak Che Sun, the Foreign Minister, one of the best and most capable of Korean states- men, was the last to yield. But even he finally gave way. In the early hours of the morning commands were issued that the seal of State should be brought from the Foreign Minister's apartment, and a treaty should be signed. Here another difficulty arose. The custodian of the seal had received orders in advance that, even if his master commanded, the seal was not to be surrendered for any such purpose. When telephonic orders were sent to him, he refused to bring the seal along, and special messengers had to be dispatched to take it from him by force. The Emperor himself asserts to this day that he did not consent."

I think it’s very shameless to say that 1905 treaty was not one-sided because a few Korean amendments were accepted. The Korean Ministers knew they had no other way but to agree from their experience with previous forceful treaties with Japan. Japan had no intention to negotiate in a true sense from the beginning. To get the paper signed and their unjust business done, Ito accepted the some Ministers’ amendments. You know Japan needed a piece of paper signed to tell the other nations Korea became a protectorate of Japan. Their meeting started early in the morning and lasted until the early morning of the following day, which shows there were strong objections and resistance from Korean Ministers. Using the military force to conclude the treaty was preplanned by Cabinet Meeting on Oct. 27th. Anyway, the amendment Korea suggested was useless because Japan annexed Korean 5 years later.

Five out of eight Ministers signed the treaty and Emperor Gojong didn’t. Afterwards Emperor Gojong worked hard to invalidate that treaty seeking international help. Two months later, Emperor Gojong made a document declaring invalidity of Treaty and London Tribune reported about it on Dec.1, 1906. He wrote personal letters to send to the Heads of 9 nations to appeal for their support against the illegal signing of Treaty.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/kPAAKQL-uZ9LTpz_3qr0A0YS6QODNm7BWkm3UJ6P9KtD8Z9e_OYkpY2gPEOYPiMJtAWQzk5cmXcnI1wWU8pLgSAgnDvaRJWyEl22-KIvOay9e0_DAQfje_LRDA https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/Cgk3qZFhWbl5jrcXnuHhMKNTf8_Acbq-PpTcREm8IuYsXv51NkA7ZBUgXo4HThm1v4q729JMi8RZ38f35erxYkYU0jgwyUhlrfu4Zro-TUTE1EQLRIK6zI6EQA

The widely known action he took was sending a secret envoy to Hague Conference on World Peace to protest unfairness of the 1905 treaty on July 1907. In retaliation to this action, Ito forced Emperor Gojong to abdicate and coerced to sign another unfair Treaty on July 1907 disbanding Korean Army. In his letter to German Emperor Wilhelm II on Jan.6, 1906, he wrote:

"Under increasing offensives from a neighboring power, we have finally been deprived of our diplomatic rights. Our independence is being threatened... Allow to explain to you the pain we are suffering. I beseech you to join efforts with other powers as protectors of weak nations and to guarantee our country independence."

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/LAW2gUapzbOwlCz9USSTgw0QW6MqhVQrZnkLCGY82WF2gQpwnGLaDt9qXYP0flNsNT6eFwLm9PSNCVHVZPfkd9mg2GKSVjYd8BKgPCZDZv21USnKmgQYxOchKg

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