national

Coming-of-Age Day ceremony held early for Hato Bus employees

14 Comments

Hato Bus Co on Friday held a Coming-of-Age ceremony for 22 employees in Tokyo ahead of Monday’s national holiday because the women will be working that day.

Coming-of-Age Day -- Seijin no Hi (成人の日) -- is held on the second Monday of each year. It is celebrated by those who turned 20 during the previous year or will do so before March 31 this year.

To mark the occasion, women traditionally wear furisode kimono.

Hato Bus held its ceremony early for the 57th year in a row. The 22 women, who are bus guides, come come from Tokyo, Hokkaido, Yamagata and Kagoshima prefectures.

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14 Comments
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The 22 women, who are bus guides, come come from Tokyo, Hokkaido, Yamagata and Kagoshima prefectures

No male bus guides or female drivers? Quite telling.

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

Perhaps not the norm, yet, but there are male tour bus guides in Japan. And plenty female tour bus (and city bus) drivers.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Did they only hire women? That is weird. 22 people and not one of them male. So much for diversity.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Sweet.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Kimono worn by girls on this day cost their parents a huge money. In Nagoya, they have a saying if a house has three daughters, the house go broke.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Kimono worn by girls on this day cost their parents a huge money.

Only if you buy them brand new. You can rent kimono in many places or buy used. Then there's always the option of having a hand-me-down from one's mother, grandmothers or aunts. (A good reason not to flog off your kimono and keep it for the next generation.)

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I thought the government lowered the coming of age to 18 and gave voting rights to them already. Is this different?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Completely shameless company free advertising! Now everyone knows this company only has girls who have just come of age working as tour guides on their buses.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

No male bus guides or female drivers? Quite telling.

Because..........

 It is celebrated by those who turned 20 during the previous year or will do so before March 31 this year.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I hope they had fun and it is very interesting to see the different styles of the furisode kimono.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

+Schopenhauer

It's different.

This is a traditional "ceremonial" coming-of-age ritual where people who just turned 20 celebrate (and swear in to become the members of the society, in some cases.)

But in the eyes of the law, 18 year-olds are considered and treated as adults, and now are given the voting rights in Japan.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A strange custom. But definitely a different, especially for guides.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Beautiful picture. The ladies are all lovely! I hope they enjoy their coming of age.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

How does this:

 It is celebrated by those who turned 20 during the previous year or will do so before March 31 this year.

inform this:

No male bus guides or female drivers? Quite telling.

?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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