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Tanks containing water from the disabled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant are seen at the power plant in March 2023. Image: REUTERS file
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Corrosion found in treated radioactive water tanks at Fukushima plant

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Of course 10 years those pipe and tank will show some sign of corrosion, they never thought of that? No wonder China refusing Sea Food from Japan. More and more series of missteps after March 2011.

-20 ( +6 / -26 )

Nuclear power is the grift that never stops giving.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

sakurasukiToday 07:02 am JST

Of course 10 years those pipe and tank will show some sign of corrosion, they never thought of that?

The corrosion was picked up as part of inspections, and this is very likely something they would expect to find. The issue will be addressed and they will move on, as reasonable people would expect.

No wonder China refusing Sea Food from Japan.

China's sea food ban is 100% politics, 0% science, as I have stated many times.

All the water that is released from Fukushima is measured beforehand and several points at sea are monitored after release, along with living organisms. The IAEA is fully involved.

TEPCO's operation is far cleaner than China's, even when looking at "official" Chinese figures which are manipulated for political reasons, meaning that China's real tritium levels are undoubtedly much higher:

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2024/03/d7a70def8245-chinas-nuclear-plants-released-tritium-above-fukushima-level-in-2022.html

More and more series of missteps after March 2011.

Or, what it actually is: a series of engineering problems that could happen anywhere, which are being monitored by the plant owner, Japanese government and IAEA, and which will be addressed with full transparency.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Or, what it actually is: a series of engineering problems that could happen anywhere, which are being monitored by the plant owner, Japanese government and IAEA, and which will be addressed with full transparency.

Exactly. The fact it is reported here at all is a testament to this.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

What I thought the treated water in the tanks was basically drinkable. Now the are saying it's not?

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

If the treated water is so safe, wouldn't it have been politically wiser to dump it into a new lake nearby? Keep it in Japan? Use it for drinking water, as "tora" proposes? Sending out to sea sends the signal that it is not all that safe.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

If no degradation was found even after 10 years it would be much more suspicious because it would indicate no surveillance is being done to detect it.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

What I thought the treated water in the tanks was basically drinkable.

They said the radioactivity levels are below the levels of drinking water after dilution. Even though noone would die drinking it, it is still industrial waste water.

Now the are saying it's not?

Where are they saying that? Where in the whole article do you read them saying anything about the quality of the waste water?

5 ( +7 / -2 )

who is this person noone people talk about?

this is why you inspect. salt water corrodes.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

It means TEPCO is checking the wastewater.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Can you imagine the extent of the damage for them to actually report it and they are probably setting themselves up for a rate hike and government request for more money will taking in record profits.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

this is why you inspect. salt water corrodes.

All water corrodes, but yeah, this would absolutely expected and as you mention is a reason for inspection. Nobody should be shocked by this at all.

Can you imagine the extent of the damage for them to actually report it

If they have to mention peeling paint to make an article of it, it's not going to be extensive.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Steel corrodes when in contact with water. End of story.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

They said the radioactivity levels are below the levels of drinking water after dilution. Even though noone would die drinking it, it is still industrial waste water.

Independent nuclear experts have offered to drink water and eat fish from the Pacific Ocean after Japan dumps its nuclear waste water into the Pacific.

Source: RNZ News (2023)

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

"Independent nuclear experts have offered to drink water (...)"

Yes, so?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Independent nuclear experts have offered to drink water and eat fish from the Pacific Ocean after Japan dumps its nuclear waste water into the Pacific.

So? Where in the article above can you find them saying the water is not safe or “basically drinkable” as you put it?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Steel corrodes when in contact with water. End of story.

A shorter end to the story is when ‘radioactivity’ and water corrode steel!

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

More than 1000 tanks were installed over 10 years ago and they’ve found corrosion and peeling paint in…

…3.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Japanese public seem to misread as if dumping self-named "treated water" was only once at last August despite actually endless continuation.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The Japanese government and TEPCO have said that the treated water released from the Fukushima plant is diluted to reduce the levels of tritium to less than one-40th of the country's national safety standards.

So only Japan's standards now.

Anyway how about the other radionuclides in the wastewater, up to what standards have they reduced it?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

So only Japan's standards now.

It's always been, and always only been, the Japanese standards. What other standards should Japan follow? Italy's? Ecuador's?

Anyway how about the other radionuclides in the wastewater, up to what standards have they reduced it?

The answer might surprise you: to Japanese standards.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Tritium levels maybe below some standards but water is not drinkable because there are far more dangerous radionuclides in it.

And the levels aren't disclosed.

only tritium is being discussed Asif it's the only thing that matter even though it's the one which is safe.

And the gullible unquestionably lap it all up hahahaha

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Lol

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

They'll always find something to complain about. Alternatives are much quicker release of the water or using other materials for the tanks. But that would also only lead to crying out loud about too high volumes of released water or an increasing of microplastics in the sea and so on.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

only tritium is being discussed Asif it's the only thing that matter even though it's the one which is safe.

There have been umpteen articles here which have explained that the ALPS process has been used to remove radioactive materials other than tritium before the water is placed into the tanks for discharge.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

there are far more dangerous radionuclides in it.

Noone chained otherwise. But what matters is not if they are contained, but how much.

And the levels aren't disclosed.

Of course they are, they even make up the largest part of the analysis reports that are published with every single release.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Aoi AzuuriToday 02:46 pm JST

Japanese public seem to misread as if dumping self-named "treated water" was only once at last August despite actually endless continuation.

If they "misread," then that's their own fault. The information is out there; all people have to do is take a couple minutes to read it.

Anyone who did bother to read about this subject would know that all releases so far have gone to plan, that the IAEA has monitored every one, and that this will continue.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

albaleoToday 03:41 pm JST

There have been umpteen articles here which have explained that the ALPS process has been used to remove radioactive materials other than tritium before the water is placed into the tanks for discharge.

Indeed.

Sadly, this line is attempted on every single article by at least one of a certain group of posters. I responded just the other day, and will copy-paste the same info for the dozenth time.

...

The other (62) radionuclides are removed/reduced to safe levels by ALPS. The issue is the tritium, and that's why the water is diluted so that tritium levels are 6-7 times lower than the WHO's drinking water standard. This is verified by the IAEA.

https://www.iaea.org/topics/response/fukushima-daiichi-nuclear-accident/fukushima-daiichi-alps-treated-water-discharge/faq

ALPS is a pumping and filtration system, which uses a series of chemical reactions to remove 62 radionuclides from contaminated water. However, ALPS is not able to remove tritium from the contaminated water.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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