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Court upholds deportation order for Thai teenager born and raised in Japan

149 Comments
By Minami Funakoshi and Thomas Wilson

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It all has to be blamed on the mother as she caused this problem.

On the bright side, he is fluent in Japanese and that will be a super asset when he is back in Thailand wearing flip flops and setting goals for his future.

-69 ( +16 / -85 )

Thanks for f@cking up my life Mom, I know you meant well. And Pop, can't forget you. Thanks for abandoning me when I was young.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

More inhumanity from immigration and the courts in Japan.

34 ( +48 / -14 )

I stand to be corrected, but based on the article that appeared a few days ago wasn't this the expected outcome of the legal case? The court had no general discretion to allow him to stay, they just had to decide whether the deportation order was legal, which it was. However, wasn't the point of the mother voluntarily returning to Thailand that the Minister of Justice (who does have this discretionary power) may now excercise it to offer some sort of humanitarian visa for the child? It seems like the story hasn't reached its final conclusion yet.

20 ( +21 / -1 )

What did this young boy do wrong? He didn't ask to be born in Japan, to an illegal mother and deadbeat father. He just was. He lived his life, learned the language, and tried to assimilate, and for that he gets punished! This is a screwed up system. Good luck with your shrinking population Japan, you are in big trouble.

22 ( +35 / -13 )

Tokyo District Court judges said in June Won could win a special residence permit if his mother - who at the time was also on provisional release - left Japan, and if he found another guardian.

Which will now force everyone else in the same situation to never trust anything immigration tells them ever again.

This is a HUGE black eye on Japan. I for one would love the UN to take this case up and shame Japan in front of the world!

24 ( +36 / -12 )

So, I don't necessarily share the idea that the mother is unqualifiedly blameworthy, but I'll grant it for the sake of argument.

The kid is still undeniably blameless. Why is he being made to suffer for something as random as being born to undocumented parents? Any country that ostensibly recognizes equality among persons cannot discriminate against a person based on their parents' actions because that is based on luck.

The kid deserves Japanese citizenship for being born and raised in a country tbat now constitutes his home. Forcing one to leave their home is cruel. Even more so when the individual could have done nothing to change their situation.

25 ( +33 / -8 )

I agree that the kid should be allowed to stay in Japan. It's not his fault his mom is stupid

-8 ( +9 / -17 )

Just proves how much Japan is still an isolationist country. That child was born and raised in Japan. He should be able to stay. Not his fault that his parents made stupid decisions.

11 ( +23 / -12 )

Wait a minute, he's 16, has a loving mum, is of sound mind and body and is bilingual. Go back to Thailand, and if it really is in his hearts desire to study in Japan come back as an exchange student. Plenty of Japanese 16 yr olds in orphanages that would swap places with him in an instant. It's not the end of the world.

-12 ( +17 / -29 )

Yubaru, I think it's important to note that the lower court probably just mentioned in passing that it was one of the options that might be available. The court definetly didn't promise that he could stay if the mother leaves (it's simply not within their power to do this). Equally, the Minister of Justice/Immigration is likely to be very careful not to give any ironclad guarantees in this situation.

Things seem to be up in the air at the moment and we just have to wait and see. Hopefully we get a positive result, but the Minister is probably not going to say anything until the time limit for appeals has been exhausted.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

What utter BS!!

This is not the mother or the father's fault, and it is CERTAINLY not the boys.

This is all down to the ridiculous attitude of the Japanese government - and I have to say the Japanese people who support it - about "evil" foreigners.

This is a Medieval attitude that locked Japan from the world for 200 years and that is LONG past its use-by date.

You people have to wake up to the FACT that Japan is sliding into a period where an ever-aging and shrinking population is going to turn your country into a social and economic basket case unless you DO SOMETHING about allowing foreign nationals to obtain citizenship.

-1 ( +12 / -13 )

The father sounds like a real deadbeat.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

You people have to wake up to the FACT that Japan is sliding into a period where an ever-aging and shrinking population is going to turn your country into a social and economic basket case unless you DO SOMETHING about allowing foreign nationals to obtain citizenship

I think the percentage of the population that reads the comments section of JT is rather small. Your message may not get through. The path to citizenship is very clear and fair. Follow the rules and all is very smooth. Making exceptions sets precedent and encourages more abuse of the process. Anchor babies will become part of the path to remaining in Japan. Are you suggesting that that is a good thing for Japan? Why didn't the mum marry the father and become legal? Too many viable and legal options were available in this case and the mother chose none of them.

5 ( +13 / -8 )

Heartless...

1 ( +12 / -11 )

Good old Japan! And some people complain and demand to know why Japan is so far behind on human rights lists. Shame on Japan!

2 ( +16 / -14 )

I see the father is also Thai. That makes their claim even more ridiculous.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

Fluency in Japanese both speaking and writing will prove a tremendous asset for him. Think of the business opportunities.

And since he speaks Thai already, learning to read and write it will be easy for him.

-7 ( +11 / -18 )

Yes, I believe there was talk of allowing the boy to stay IF the mother returns - which she gracefully agreed to. That was the fatal mistake she made: trusting in Japanese willingness to exercise compassion.

Ouch, another one gets it in the back.

3 ( +12 / -9 )

japanese have difficulty empathizing with non-japanese, period...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You shouldn't break the law.

7 ( +15 / -8 )

This one case in Japan. The U.S. has over 750,000 similar cases of kids awaiting President Trump`s decision on their legal status extented by President Obama.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

The High Court judges made their ruling in little more than 10 seconds,

10 seconds eh? In the old days they would have been called :"hanging judges"

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Sad story, id rather have 10 of these hard working kids than 100000 pachinko players. System needs to be revised asap.

9 ( +17 / -8 )

I'm sure he'd make an outstanding citizen.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

Legally Japan is within its rights to do this, but it's hard to see how it benefits Japan to deport someone such as this.

Given Japan's dire demographics, people like this young man who can contribute to Japan are sorely needed.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

It sounds like another example where the court did an outstanding job correctly interpreting outdated laws based on early 20th century ideals

Don't forget, Japan still has laws dictating that dancing is not allowed in night clubs of particular size

This is a job for the legislative branch to make the changes that will give the judicial system a much needed kick in the rear

If you're a Japanese citizen, you should contact your district's elected officials and demand a better future for kids like June Won

1 ( +6 / -5 )

It may be true that he is young and that he is bilingual but it is still a shame that he may not have a choice in the matter. All that he knows is Japan, he will have to say goodbye to all of those dear to him. They will miss out on the joy of his presence.

For those who choose to move for a new life it is their choice.

It is human nature to yearn for a sense of belonging in family, community and country. It is unfortunate that the courts didn't demonstrate the value in him.

Sad....

4 ( +5 / -1 )

M3M3M3DEC. 07, 2016 - 07:10AM JST

However, wasn't the point of the mother voluntarily returning to Thailand that the Minister of Justice (who does have this discretionary power) may now excercise it to offer some sort of humanitarian visa for the child? It seems like the story hasn't reached its final conclusion yet.

I sure hope you are right.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Won’s mother had already left Japan after lower court judges said her son could win residency if she returned to Thailand.

And they backed out on that!? Disgusting!

4 ( +10 / -6 )

The kid deserves Japanese citizenship for being born and raised in a country tbat now constitutes his home.

But that isn't how Japanese nationality is "given". And it's that way for the majority of the countries.

I feel sorry for this kid but Japan has a right to decide who they allow in and stay. The mother took her chances and now her child is paying the penalty. It is unfair but if the courts allowed this kid to stay, you can bet the number of people trying to screw the system with anchor babies would increase. Frankly, why people try and play the system in Japan is beyond me. It is known for not being open and welcoming.

I don't for the life of me understanding why the mother didn't teach him how t read and write Thai. This could will do well in the future with his Japanese skills. I wish him luck.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Children can stay in Japan legally if their parents return to their country of origin.

Speaking volume on the inhumanity of the Japanese system, breaking families apart instead of reunite them.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

It is not mentioned and would like to learn the actual situation if he found a legal guardian that will take him into full custody. If not then since he is a minor he will not be able to sustain himself and the government has no obligation to pay welfare. The foster homes are full with children that already has Japanese citizenship.

Basically if Japan allows him to stay then it is opening the floodgates to all illegal immigrants who will take their chances which no nation is allowing these days.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

They don't give VISAs to people who are working hard, people who never complain, people living peacefully even if these people were born and raised here (like this boy). However they don't think twice giving visas to other nationalities who did nothingt in Japan but party and womanize. Justice? Law? nope, its all about money! my mesage for this boy is, yep! leave Japan , As of now Thai has far more better opportunities than Japan. Japan is a dead end of opportunities.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Morally and from a humane POV he should be allowed to stay. But legally no. In most civilized countries there are strict penalties for those who go around the legal visa system, and Japan being who it is, it shouldn't be a surprise how strict they are to certain people. Any person at the deportation office who is in need or has children has a sad story and needs help, but they are also all about to shipped out. Some people may see it at racist or xenophobic, but I don't have a problem with Japan being choosy about who we allow in in general. Obviously they don't want to make it a policy at all to allow children of illegal immigrants legal status.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

It's interesting that biblical/classical ideas such as parents' sins/curses being passed onto children and grandchildren still hold some truth in 2016.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Now he'll be forced to move to a completely foreign country he doesn't feel her belongs too. On the bright side, he'll at least be reunited with his mom.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

It's unfortunate, but that's how life goes.

As mentioned above, he will be reunited with his mum at least.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Triring: Basically if Japan allows him to stay then it is opening the floodgates to all illegal immigrants who will take their chances which no nation is allowing these days.

Unless they're scrounging for votes. USA can't be the only country with something like this, can it?:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DREAM_Act

The DREAM Act (acronym for Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors) is an American legislative proposal for a multi-phase process for undocumented immigrants in the United States that would first grant conditional residency and upon meeting further qualifications, permanent residency. ...

Criticism - Opponents of the DREAM Act argue that it encourages and rewards unauthorized immigration, acting as a "magnet" attracting more undocumented immigrants and creating a chain migration by family members. The Center for Immigration Studies has raised concerns that it would admit individuals who have already formed their identities overseas (i.e. people who arrived up to age 16), that undocumented immigrants up to age 35 are allowed to obtain legal residence through it, that it would result in massive fraud similar to the 1986 amnesty, that it will encourage additional undocumented immigration,[50] and that it will shield gang members from deportation. ...

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

However they don't think twice giving visas to other nationalities who did nothingt in Japan but party and womanize.

You mean those who legally applied for a visa, are university graduates and come here to work and pay taxes? Sorry, how are these two types of people similar in comparison?

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Its sad to see the level of prejudice that is allowed to run free and rampant in this country. The immigration office blatantly LIED to the family. The fact that they made their decision in 10 seconds shows that they want to send the strong message "If you're not pure Japanese, you're not one of us!" Bad Japan! Very bad!

6 ( +11 / -5 )

Is anyone suprised by the decision ? Really? I would have put a wager on it. Poor lad. On the bright side though going back to Thailand and reuniting with his mother may not be such a bad thing. As some have stated he can put his language skills to use, start a business, become an entrepreneur, the world is his oyster. He may even find a smile on his face eventually. Another lost chance by Japan to move forward, am sure they will wear their stubbornness, lack of heart, flexibility, character and sense like a badge of pride. After all rules are rules right? TOP decision.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

as I've told you countless times on this site. BLOOD is all what matters for the japanese officials, like a operation code. You can be born and raised in Japan, as long as you don't have any "ties" with Japan which means for them, having ties with a japanese, getting married or having a kid you're an outsider that does not deserve to be on their land.

Hey, can tell you I met a handful of foreigners that served TIME PRISON for many years (drugs, etc) and still could manage to avoid deportation simply because they got married. There was another chinese that was apprehended for overstaying and got freed with a "special visa" within 1 month. How? He was married to another chinese but his japanese LOVER came to the immigration and gave the proof she was pregnant. How crazy is that? I'm sorry folks but overstayer or not, the only way to have peace in this place is getting married to a local. The rest are just very special cases.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Don't worry, we have variety shows, idols, "talents" and flavour of the month like Piko Taro to blindside all actual social and economic issues in Japan plc.

This results is not unexpected. What bothers me is:

Won’s mother had already left Japan after lower court judges said her son could win residency if she returned to Thailand.

So it was a blatant lie, "could" means no hope in hell in Japan judging from the verdict.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

The blame for this boy's predicament lies fairly and squarely with his irresponsible parents - neither of whom are Japanese nationals.

That said, Japan should have deported the whole family a long time ago, thus sparing the boy this tortuous affair.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Wow, just look at all these comments. So many ugly people. "Go to Thai, think of all the business opportunities." You're treating the kid as if he was an adult with all the choices in his life. Going to Thai is not an career option, for this boy it means the very end of the world as he know it, all his friends, customs, education, absolutely nothing will ever make sense for him in Thai and his life will be destroyed for nothing. Can't think of a bright future for this boy if they don't allow him to stay. Kicking out perfect potential citizens, way to go Japan.

2 ( +10 / -8 )

I guess they are worried about the precedent this may set, however the whole point of courts is to interpret the law on a case by case basis

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Seems the US has the correct way of dealing with native born children of illegal immigrantshttp://www.alllaw.com/articles/nolo/us-immigration/can-child-undocumented-immigrant-become-citizen.html.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Man... if it hasn't been thought of/attempted already. Can't one of his friend's parents adopt him and save him from getting deported? Poor kid.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Won’s mother had already left Japan after lower court judges said her son could win residency if she returned to Thailand.

Aren't lots of Japanese people busting their arses for a similar promise of full time employee status?

No hope for them when the state models the same duplicity.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

...highlighting the country’s deep reluctance to accept foreigners.... bring the judges for this rassistic statement immediately to a international UN tribunal in The Hague.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Great example and a correct ruling, even though it might not be right on humanitarian grounds . Would definitely highlight that illegal immigration is not tolerated here under any excuse. Hopefully, he will be given some sort of stay until he could finish studies.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

Won’s mother had already left Japan after lower court judges said her son could win residency if she returned to Thailand.

So the judges lied to him, his mother and their lawyer? They lied and tricked them, in effect. Astonishing, truly astonishing.

Does anyone in authority actually ever tell the truth in this country? All we ever seem to see is people lying through their teeth.....

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Go back to Thailand

It's not "back" if wasn't born there.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

on and anyone commenting about UN tribunal... Japan is not a signee ,its immigration policy is defined very different from any migratory country and absolutely should NOT follow any UN decisions or tribunals.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

They Pearl Harbored the mother and son.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

"lower court judges said her son could win residency if she returned to Thailand".So the judges lied to him, his mother and their lawyer? They lied and tricked them, in effect.

No could is not a promised, it's raises the possibility of something happening. She could say yes if I asked her out. There is not a fixed promise in that assertion, She might say no as well. There was no lying or trickery, what it was, was people grasping straws.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

what a terrible xenophobic decision. Ugh

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Forgive my ignorance of Japanese immigration law. If and when he is deported, if there is no appeal, can he then turn around and apply for reentry into Japan and obtain legal status? Perhaps the same way Japanese Brazilians are able to come into Japan? If so, he could take the test to be a Japanese citizen. Or is a deported person forever banned from entering Japan?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If and when he is deported, if there is no appeal, can he then turn around and apply for reentry into Japan and obtain legal status?

If someone is deported in Japan, he or she can apply for a Japanese visa again after 5 years. I think this will be the case for his mother. But I'm not sure about this boy because this is pretty unusual case. But it's certain that he won't be banned forever.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Rules are rules and laws are laws.

But this is so sad, so inhumane!!

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Very bad decision from Japanese side. But the positive note is he is going to the country whose immigration policy is one of the toughest in Asia.Even tougher that Japan's.I met many many Japanese people who want to live in Thailand but can't.Japan is not attractive anymore for a good future.Good luck young boy.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

The dark side of the 'Cool Japan' no one outside knows. You should deport people like those ungrateful immigrants that come to your country and want to change religion, the way woman dresses, bringing rules back from the dark ages, that is punishable, but a innocent 16 y old born and raised as a Japanese? His 'blood' is not Japanese, they say.

People here need to learn that Japanese is not a race.

If the boy feels like part of Japanese society and is 100% adapted to the local culture, what are they complaining about? Don't we need people is this country?

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

Thailand which his birth's mother original country have even one of the toughest immigration law and policy in Asia just for your guys information. A liitle bit of irony here.....

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It is hard to fathom the logic behind such an exclusionary decision, especially at a time in Japan's history when it is in dire need of new blood, more diversity and globalization. Japan is falling behind the rest of the world by almost any measure and the status-quo does nothing to address the serious issues facing the country. These include a plummeting population, loss of global competitiveness, the general sense of pessimism and malaise among the youth, a distinct lack of empathy for anyone who is more unfortunate or different, a lack of belief in the goodness of people, insularity, distrust of each other, and deeply entrenched misogyny, racism and xenophobia.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

The High Court judges made their ruling in little more than 10 seconds, with cries of “Why?” and “Terrible” coming from a packed public gallery.

A few people seem upset about this point and it sounds horrible. Just to clarify, this is simply poor reporting on the part of Reuters. The court did not make their ruling 10 seconds after hearing the arguments. What took 10 seconds is just reading the final result after months of deliberation.

The way it works is that the court recieves the all the submissions in writing. They reserve their judgment and deliberate for months and months and eventually write a huge multi-page decision. The court then sends a letter telling you the judges have reached a decision in your case and the outcome will be read out in open court on a particular day. The full paper judgment with reasons and explanations is mailed to your home a day or two later. Anyone can come sit in the public gallery but all you will hear is the judges reading a list of cases and saying something like "in the case of X v. Minister of Justice, the appeal is dismissed". This is what takes 10 seconds, not the entire process of making a ruling. I hope this helps explain how things actually work, especially for the Reuters journalists.

13 ( +14 / -1 )

...a distinct lack of empathy for anyone who is more unfortunate or different, a lack of belief in the goodness of people, insularity, distrust of each other, and deeply entrenched misogyny, racism and xenophobia.

Thank heavens 'virtue signalling' hasn't made its way into the Japanese lexicon.

This boy's parents chose to stay in Japan illegally. They could have returned to Thailand at any point and schooled their son there. I agree that this decision is harsh on the son, but I fail to see why the Japanese authorities should be chastised for upholding the law.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

You have to love that even when bashing their heads against the wall (on paper) about what to do over the aging population problem, they deport people born and raised here. Proof Japan is WAY behind in human rights and compassion, not to mention just plain common sense.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

It seems like forcing his mother leave for his sake was all a ruse.

“We must say that the (lower court’s) decision and the deportation order are legally legitimate.”

...legally legitimate? Reinforced justification...

1 ( +5 / -4 )

No matter what - the boy is actually Japanese (if they haven't lived in isolation with only Thais surrounded environment). Going trough Japanese public school and all - naturally he is pretty much culturally native! So with all arguments - it is inhuman. And thinking about the generations of Koreans that are not Japanese citizens on paper (but special permanent residents) no matter they are from generations here makes me angry... As mentioned - Japan has to improve their outdated law. Of course they will be preventive of easy obtaining nationality but there are better ways, or at least more human ways...

0 ( +6 / -6 )

However they don't think twice giving visas to other nationalities who did nothingt in Japan but party and womanize.

Excellent point. All those bankers and lawyers. You really think they are paying taxes in Japan? Yeah right. They are all paid offshore and on overseas tax contracts. Tokyo is full of these leeches and the only Japanese to benefit are the private landlords who rent out their mansions. This poor kid is way more entitled to a Japanese visa having been born here and attended school up to the age of 16! Yet immigration are more than happy to grant visas to expats who cannot speak the language and who dont even contribute to national health insurance because their firms give then private health. No wonder the national pension pot is in such a mess.

You mean those who legally applied for a visa, are university graduates and come here to work and pay taxes? Sorry, how are these two types of people similar in comparison?

Just answered your question above. Being a graduate doesnt entitle you to exemption from paying your taxes.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

show me one expat not paying taxes or income, it is in fact illegal and quite strictly observed. Anyone that has a contract here pay millions in taxes and pension ( which in most cases will not be transfered ) .. absurd... ! What doesnt pay taxes are illegally employed illegal residents ( because Japan doesnt allow legal employment to illegals )

0 ( +5 / -5 )

, I think it's important to note that the lower court probably just mentioned in passing that it was one of the options that might be available. The court definetly didn't promise that he could stay if the mother leaves (it's simply not within their power to do this)

I think it's more important to note that the court had nothing to do with the "option" in the first place. Immigration gave that choice to his mother and the young man. If Mom leaves, then immigration will, in effect, made it seem as if he would be able to stay in Japan, considering his situation.

His Mom left, and the court ruled against him, making whatever "promises" that immigration made null and void with this court.

But immigration can always say they never offered this "option" as there is no paperwork on it and it was all verbal, "they said-she said" BS.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

show me one expat not paying taxes or income, it is in fact illegal and quite strictly observed. Anyone that has a contract here pay millions in taxes and pension ( which in most cases will not be transfered ) .. absurd... ! What doesnt pay taxes are illegally employed illegal residents ( because Japan doesnt allow legal employment to illegals )

Alex, just to clarify the point which is valid to this kids deportation. The vast majority of bankers and lawyers in Tokyo are on non-Japanese law employment contracts and only pay taxes in that overseas jurisdiction along with a net salary. I know that as I did so myself for over 10 years. This teenager is far more entitled to a Japanese visa.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Some JT readers..... from the top of their frigates, watching somebody drowning while yelling " see?that's why you should have built a stronger boat for yourself!"

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Even one more time Japan shows to the world that they stayed in the past. Even here in Chile, illegals have high chances of staying. Even more, if a child is born, even if the mother is an illegal immigrant, the baby gets full nationality...

3 ( +7 / -4 )

This is so stupid and inhumane on so many levels. And practically, Japan needs this type of kid who is bilingual in Japanese and Thai for future Asian-focused business. They should not be alienated against Japan. Can I adopt him to keep him here?

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Better off leaving anyway, young man. You were born and raised here but you will always be an outsider to them.. Good luck. I am definitely rooting for you.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Its tough love. Setting a precedent for an influx of pregnant woman having babies to get Japanese passports for their children, as is common in other countries such as US and Hong Kong. In this boys case I feel he has a good opertunity to go to Thailand and apply for a visa and then return to Japan with the correct visa, that would allow him to work and live in Japan, which is what happens in other countries. Its no shame that Japan is nationalistic, keeping Japan for Japanese people is a fair request by the Japanese people and the Government and Law system which represents the Japanese people. Using the decline in population or the emotion is not connected with the problem.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Tokyo District Court judges said in June Won could win a special residence permit if his mother - who at the time was also on provisional release - left Japan, and if he found another guardian.

Reuters should stop this misinformation.

In the June judgment, Tokyo District Court ORDERED his mother to be deported. His mother had no option to stay in Japan. Reporting as if his mother had left Japan so as to make it possible for him to stay in Japan is nothing but misinformation.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

TigersTokyoDome.. not anytime recent they are not, if they want to stay in Japan longer than 3-6 month and engage in any work ,they will have to be under work visa and pay in ( they might get some extra options abroad - but that also getting strict crackdown now with the mynumber system and stric reporting by any companies having business here ) I am not sure when were you employed as that , but I can assure you that is no longer the case for quite a few years.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@Yubaru, there is still hope here. There are two entirely separate issues involved.

The first is this legal case which seems to have been solely about whether the deportation order was legal. This would have involved looking at the process of whether the Minister actually took account of all the relevant considerations and basically crossed his t's and dotted his i's. If he did, then the law obviously gives him the power to deport people (it would be fairly shocking if the court decided otherwise, right?)

The second issue is this possible humanitarian visa that may or may not be granted. This is still available but the Minister is not going to issue this visa as long as the legal case is still ongoing or appeals are pending. Hopefully it will be granted once the appeal time limit runs out, or months from now when/if the Supreme court refuses to hear the case. I'm actually optimistic that we will see Utinan's smiling face in a follow-up story in a few months.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The only things that could have kept him here- A. He was born to Western parents, particularly white parents.....B. He is plays a sport well enough to qualify for the National team or plays baseball on a Koshien Tournament qualifying team.....C. He is an idol/model/one trick pony.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

M3M3M3DEC. 07, 2016 - 03:06PM JST The first is this legal case which seems to have been solely about whether the deportation order was legal.

Parents were not born in Japan and were not legal immigrant. If you have children, there is no legal status. Simple in japn laws.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

The outcome of this boy's fate leaves me fumingly speechless. I read the story previously and thought it was the end of this, not a happy ending as the mum has to leave so the son could stay. Now to learn that the boy has to leave as well is just incredulous beyond words.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

The vast majority of bankers and lawyers in Tokyo are on non-Japanese law employment contracts and only pay taxes in that overseas jurisdiction along with a net salary.

What overseas jurisdiction?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There's another case I've read in RocketNews currently, this time about a Sikh boy.

As far as I could remember, there's a similar case way back nearly 10 years ago and at that time it's about Noriko Calderon. As far as I can remember Noriko's case was very similar to Won's case except that she was allowed to stay but her parents were not.

Is there any different to this case this time?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Ness, for example, you get "seconded" to Tokyo from the Hong Kong office or whichever office has the most beneficial tax and employment clauses for your company. You then only pay Hong Kong tax. Your salary is paid into an offshore account which means you can skip Japanese salary tax etc. You can keep rolling those Hong Kong secondment contracts as long as you wish. The relevance to this story is the poster who correctly said that this teenager has far more of a right to live in Japan than these expats.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Of course it's natural to think, 'Poor kid' but whether he was caught without a visa at 2 years of age or 5 years of age or 10 or 15, doesn't really matter. In the eyes of the law, he isn't in Japan legally. The decision is tough but correct. His parents know the risks they've been taking for the past 16 years.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

leonglucy88@gmail.comDEC. 07, 2016 - 03:20PM JST The outcome of this boy's fate leaves me fumingly speechless.

Parents knew the rules. They took the risk and lost. Fault on the parents. They should've made better choice.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

As if we need yet another reason why the majority of folks have nothing but disdain and contempt for the laughing stock that is the Japanese legal system - a self serving, self perpetuating group of parasites who only exist to serve their own interests.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

The second issue is this possible humanitarian visa that may or may not be granted. This is still available but the Minister is not going to issue this visa as long as the legal case is still ongoing or appeals are pending. Hopefully it will be granted once the appeal time limit runs out, or months from now when/if the Supreme court refuses to hear the case.

Not 100% accurate info. There are some cases the Immigration makes a "deal" with the overstayer on provisional release, under special circumstances of course.: drop the case and we give you your visa. In this boy's case it was a stab on the back, but 100% of the "deals" I saw were successful. Of course they will only start thinking about your case if you marry or have a baby with a local as I've been saying from the beginning. They have limited resources for countless cases and the only thing they want is to get rid of a "lost cause" for good, i.e: people they couldn't deport for several months/years, due to the deportation order suspension in the courts. But for that you will have to be mentally prepared. If you're detained, it will cost you 6 months to get out on provisional release + 1, 2 years living without "work", at least in the places they are picky about visa status. Everytime you go to get your papers renewed they ask how's your health, if anything changed. If you're on a real marriage and you can prove it it will take just another couple of weeks or months until they ask you to their negotiation table. 1 month later, new visa, new life.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

All these 'its the parents fault/ he should have got a visa' posters sitting comfortably in their fat western armchairs. That does not reason why Japan let this kid be born and educated here for 16 years before kicking him out of the country. 16 years. His whole childhood and schooling. Explain that.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

There just was a news on German TV about a sigh or is it singh ( indian religion ) high teen being born here and never used any other language than JP who still is on review with his family. ..... never go to an island

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Great example and a correct ruling, even though it might not be right on humanitarian grounds . Would definitely highlight that illegal immigration is not tolerated here under any excuse.

?? An awful example. 16 years to make a decision on an immigration case. Illegal immigration is not tolerated in Japan for more than 16 years more like.

Hopefully, he will be given some sort of stay until he could finish studies.

Like for the past 16 years.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

TigersTokyoDomeDEC. 07, 2016 - 04:18PM JST

Ness, for example, you get "seconded" to Tokyo from the Hong Kong office or whichever office has the most beneficial tax and employment clauses for your company. You then only pay Hong Kong tax. Your salary is paid into an offshore account which means you can skip Japanese salary tax etc.

I am afraid it is tax evasion.

Japanese income tax law says that if a person works in Japan and receives salary, he/she must report the salary to the Japanese tax office and pay income tax, regardless who pays the salary or where the salary is received.

If he/she fails to report the salary to the tax office by March 15 of the next year, he/she has to pay additional tax for late filing and gets criminal penalty (up to 10 years in prison) for tax evasion.

If the scheme were legal, no one would pay taxes.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Simply pathetic ...

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

It all has to be blamed on the mother as she caused this problem. On the bright side, he is fluent in Japanese and that will be a super asset when he is back in Thailand wearing flip flops and setting goals for his future.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

@Moonraker (7:03 AM JST) - VERY well said !

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Japan offers 3 months visa upon arrival for Asean citizens. This is what I will be using...3-mths and then go elsewhere.

Thailand is much better than Japan, in my opinion. And his language will be a great asset especially if he joins their Foreign Service.

Wish him a great future. Napolean Hill, a movitational write said: In every adversity there lies the seeds of an equal or greater benefit.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

While this is terribly sad and should basically not happen, the question is:"what was there to be expected?". This court will not to and is not allowed to decide against the word of the law. They took only ten seconds to deliberate because the lower court did also exactly that. By taking only ten seconds the court actually made the appealing to a higher court very easy, by signalling that this should not be decided at their level.

This is only the Tokyo High Court, they're not THAT important, but just a necessary stepping stone in the process. In any case, they're not those that can change or challenge existing laws.

He should appeal and bring this further up the ladder.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I gotta weigh-in here 'cause the mood was pretty dim about 60 or so comments above (yes,yes, I skipped over and down )...The point is he will be fine. he should view it as an extended school trip. in a few years or a decade, he might fall in love with one of the countless Japanese tourists flocking there. And my guess is that he will never identify with the poverty or hardship over there because he sees himself as Japanese ( despite any hardship that may be waiting for him). He will be ever the more motivated to continue hitting the books and perfecting his Kanji for the day he returns...maybe married to a national...

2 ( +4 / -2 )

And the sad truth for this kid, from Japan's point of view is:

"Yeah kid, you were born here, learned our language and our ways, did well in school, you could soon be a good contributor to our society but SO WHAT? We still don't want you around. Get the f out and find yourself another home, wherever that could be".

This is the unfortunately the harsh reality of "Beautiful Japan".

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Japan has behaved disgracefully towards thus boy and shown that it is ultimately a cold, selfish country.

Yes, rules are rules, as some have pointed out, but that does not mean that a country cannot have some degree of compassion in their application.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Most of the non-Japanese I know do not have health insurance or pension. Those with multiple jobs often never full income tax rates either. The system is ludicrous. Depending on which company you work for, you can be stung for full taxes, pensions that you can't receive because you can't pay in for 25 years, and Japan's crappy 70% health insurance, or you can avoid the lot. My best friend here earns a million yen a year more than I do, avoids paying income taxes and gets charged withholding taxes at lower rates, and also avoids national health and pension, instead paying 17,000 yen per month for full Interglobal cover. I pay well over double the taxes he does on a lower income than his. Fact is, Japan does not do fair or nice, as this kid is finding out. Japan is a country packed full of incomprehensible antiquated laws and ridiculous multi-tiered systems that screw over some and not others based on a bizarre set of existing bad laws they won't change. The fact is this kid is illegal because both his parents were illegal. The law says he has to leave, so this court returns that verdict. Personally I would let him stay and become a much-needed tax payer, but that's not the law unfortunately.The laws don't deal with common sense, not when it comes to salaries, tax rates, pensions, healthcare, and definitely not when it comes to immigration.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Man, that's cold.

Really cold.

Clinical, heartless, mean spirited, cold.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Wait a minute!

I thought one is eligible to apply for permanant residency or citizenship after staying in Japan for 10 years.

How is this any different for this kid? He almost finished highschool to boot.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

So much for being "open" towards foreigners.

Shame on you Japan.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I thought one is eligible to apply for permanant residency or citizenship after staying in Japan for 10 years.

Of course, one can do that only after staying LEGALLY in Japan for ten years. Permanent residency implies one has already a valid visa, that does not require renewal.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The pure Yamato blood. A very Japanese friend's DNA test revealed 25% Polynesian, 21% Central Asian, 4% Native American and 2% South Asian.

When will we escape the yoke of myths and superstition?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

He seems like an intelligent young man.

It's such a shame considering that Japan suffers from a shortage of young and capable people, but nothing makes much sense here regarding such matters.

Japan's loss.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I'm curious about what the intention was with this ruling.

It seems to me that the following two things will now occur:

1) This boy will be faced with a life of struggle and disappointment due to the Ministry of Justice's complete lack of understanding of what the word "Justice" means. This boy was and is not a criminal yet is being forced to leave the only land he knows.

2) This ruling virtually proves that all illegal aliens, visa overstayers, provisional release holders, etc, should not believe a single word uttered by Japanese Immigration and / or the Ministry of Justice. The MOJ lied to the mother in order to give hope that her son would be able to stay, but the current director of immigration and probably the minister of justice himself ordered this verdict to be given. Why should they risk being captured by immigration if they're going to renege on promises?

Immigration already has its reputation stained with the blood of the dozens of people they've killed in their detention centers over the past few years.

What is REALLY REALLY sad is that if this boy appeals the decision any further, immigration may attempt to detain him in a special kind of jail in order to force his hand; endure detention or leave Japan. These people are sick puppies and this verdict makes it clear to anyone with any decency.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

No other Country in the World has thinkers like the ones running Japan! The thinking that goes on in Japan is from the 1800's.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Some of the posters here remind me of the Dr Seuss story about the Grinch...." his heart was two sizes too small. "

Have some humanity left in your heart instead of bleating rules are rules.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

@canadianbento I am guessing that Japan is far from the only country that would come to such a decision. It's very sad that some sort of legal accommodation could not be found for the kid.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

This decision by the Tokyo High Court is certainly not "Japans Finest Hour".

In fact I would go as far as to say that the decision degrades the peoples of Japan, of whom the High Court Judges are out of touch with.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

smithinjapan - oh so this kid gets deported and you cry japan is the bottom of the human rights list when theres that whole immigration refugee mess in europe? please grow up. and besides youre not japanese. i dont get why foreigners always want to try and change japan.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Dcog9065. Yes, courts should act on a case by case basis.The blem seems to be that Japanese Law is devoid of EQUITY.

This case also highlights that Japan has a probl with "Due Process of Law".<>

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Legally Japan is within their rights. Morally, it's a pretty reprehensible decision, nothing to be respected. They could maintain law while still being humanitarian, but they chose not to.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Call me heartless but am tired of cheaters who use my taxes to game the system by going through all courts until they reach the Supreme Court.

I used legal ways to live in Japan, degrees, work visa and I don't like people who jump the queue. This guy and his mother should have been deported long time ago.

When he will be back to HIS home country he may have a shock when he founds out how Thailand treat the farang (the foreigners, the gaijins...), how it deport Laotian, Myanmar families and children born in Thailand, children who lived there for decades. He may also have a shock when he will find out that Thailand Nationality Law is Jus Sanguinis, based on blood...just like the Japanese one. Shocking isn’t it?

This entire story just like the Sikh family weeks ago is just the same old “kids and language” scam. Live illegally in a country, reproduce and pretend the kids will never be able to live in their home country. Oh please, give me a break. There are millions of kids who move to another country every year because of daddy or mommy job and they don’t speak the language of the new home.

Deport him now and stop him from using my taxes for free lawyers and causing case backlog.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

I am afraid it is tax evasion.

Japanese income tax law says that if a person works in Japan and receives salary, he/she must report the salary to the Japanese tax office and pay income tax, regardless who pays the salary or where the salary is received.

If he/she fails to report the salary to the tax office by March 15 of the next year, he/she has to pay additional tax for late filing and gets criminal penalty (up to 10 years in prison) for tax evasion.

If the scheme were legal, no one would pay taxes.

It is legal if you are seconded to Japan and your employment contract is non-Japanese and you pay taxes to that jurisdiction and your salary is paid offshore. Not anyone can do it because your employer needs to cover those three points.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

tokyobakayaro,

When he will be back to (sic) HIS home country

Basic physics: a person cannot go back somewhere he has never visited. Ditto for home country. His is here.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

I used legal ways to live in Japan, degrees, work visa and I don't like people who jump the queue. This guy and his mother should have been deported long time ago.

I shall try my best to hide my utter contempt for this post. This teenager was born here. Were you? This teenager was schooled here for 16 years? Were you? This teenager is fluent in his only language, Japanese. Are you?

What gives anyone the self-congratulatory right to reside in Japan just because you have a degree? That would entitle millions to live here. Jump the queue? This teenager has been queuing for 16 years pal, I bet he was in the queue way before you.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Basic physics: a person cannot go back somewhere he has never visited. Ditto for home country. His is here.

He is Thai; he has Thai citizenship and passport thanks to his parents who are both Thai citizens so Thailand is his home country.

You cannot be from a Jus Sanguinis country and cry foul because the place you live in is also Jus Sanguinis. He does not belong here; making an exception is like calling for more cases like him to happen. In the visa scam/illegal immigration world, news travel fast, it took just few hours for everyone in Africa and Middle East to know that Germany has opened its doors.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

He is Thai; he has Thai citizenship and passport thanks to his parents who are both Thai citizens so Thailand is his home country.

My children also have British citizenship, they have British passports, and their Father is British. Their home country is Japan.

In the visa scam/illegal immigration world, news travel fast

In the world of fast news, 16 years to be precise.

I detest your selfish, fenced-in, right wing point of view.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

If you live long in Japan you have overstayed your welcome and start getting questions like 1) Are you still in Japan after a long time. or when are you leaving ?

I've lived in Japan probably longer than most posters here have lived on Planet Earth. I'm still waiting to start getting those questions. Actually, I'm not waiting, I don't expect to get them, ever.

They don't like foreigners to know so much about the Japanese

Rubbish. The more they(=most Japanese) think you know, they less they feel they have to explain/justify, the more relaxed they feel, and the easier it is to just get on with things.

As for the fate of this poor lad, I agree with TigersTokyoDome. His citizenship/nationality are mere marks on a bit of paper. The only home country he has ever known is Japan, and failure to recognise that is a perfect example of The Law showing itself to be a pig-headed ass.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

This news is not about me or about you or your kids

Japan is governed by laws; laws are made to be followed by citizens and foreigners. Don't question them or violate them. Citizenship law in Japan just like in Thailand or in India (the Sikh family) is based on blood. Not on soil but on blood.

Is one of his parents Japanese? No? So, he is not Japanese. If you are British and have kids in Thailand, kids are not Thai. Same rules apply here. It is unfair? Grab a mirror!

Jus sanguinis (Latin: right of blood) is a principle of nationality law by which citizenship is not determined by place of birth but by having one or both parents who are citizens of the state.

Does he have a visa? No? So he cannot stay here. Law again.

Saying he should get a visa because he lived here and deserve one is a complete nonsense. It is like me saying I deserve the next Super Lotto big check because I played the same numbers for a decade. Being illegal for decades does not make you legal or a citizen.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Rubbish. The more they(=most Japanese) think you know, they less they feel they have to explain/justify, the more relaxed they feel, and the easier it is to just get on with things

Utter rubbish. How long can that be.? You must be living in your little cocoon and have not really interacted with Japanese people during your so called long stay. Unfortunately a large majority of foreigners don't share your opinion.

.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Saying he should get a visa because he lived here and deserve one is a complete nonsense. It is like me saying I deserve the next Super Lotto big check because I played the same numbers for a decade. Being illegal for decades does not make you legal or a citizen.

Or it's as nonsense as you saying you have a right to be in front of him in the Japanese visa queue because you have a degree:-

I used legal ways to live in Japan, degrees, work visa and I don't like people who jump the queue. This guy and his mother should have been deported long time ago.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

TigersTokyoDomeDEC. 08, 2016 - 10:56AM JST

Japanese income tax law says that if a person works in Japan and receives salary, he/she must report the salary to the Japanese tax office and pay income tax, regardless who pays the salary or where the salary is received.

It is legal if you are seconded to Japan and your employment contract is non-Japanese and you pay taxes to that jurisdiction and your salary is paid offshore. Not anyone can do it because your employer needs to cover those three points.

This is my last piece of advice for you. It is tax evasion and has very serious consequences. Your 3 points are the condition that your employer is free from Japanese "withholding tax", but you are still required to report your income to Japanese tax office and pay your income tax. See a competent tax lawyer who is licensed to advice on Japanese tax laws.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

This is my last piece of advice for you. It is tax evasion and has very serious consequences. Your 3 points are the condition that your employer is free from Japanese "withholding tax", but you are still required to report your income to Japanese tax office and pay your income tax. See a competent tax lawyer who is licensed to advice on Japanese tax laws.

I am not agreeing with it my friend. I am disagreeing with it. And my argument was that this teenager is far more entitled to a visa than the expats in the tax-free zone. But unfortunately it was legal until at least 2010 when it last applied to me. The company in question is top 10 in the world in its industry and includes tax advice. It is not tax evasion if your employment jurisdiction is not Japan and you dont receive a salary in Japan.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Utter rubbish. How long can that be.?

Upwards of 40 years.

You must be living in your little cocoon and have not really interacted with Japanese people

Virtually everyone I speak to on a daily basis is Japanese: neighbours, leisure, work, friends, community, family. The vast majority of it (excluding kids and critters) in Japanese. If my lifestyle constitutes 'not really interacting with Japanese people', I wonder what you consider 'interacting' to be?

your so called long stay.

I don't call it a stay. I call it my life. Japan is my home, has been for a very long time.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

TigersTokyoDome - Fact cheack: if you're not Japanese, you have no say in the matter. 'Mkay? You managing to live here without breaking the laws thanks to your degrees and diligent work does not relate in any way to a child whose only criminal act was that that he was born. He hasn't broken the law!

The law was broken to begin with...

And the Japanese people (those that matter and have a say) are not seeing it as such. For them it's acceptable to say "kid, go back home" to a child born and educated in Japan, who's never been in Thailand. The Japanese do not accept any contributions such a person could make to their society, just because his mother could do not better. The sins of the mother are to be paid in full by the innocent child... That is the message all gaijins (myself included) should get.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

He is Thai; he has Thai citizenship and passport thanks to his parents who are both Thai citizens so Thailand is his home country.

In paper only. He has never been to Thailand, so you can hardly say it's his home country. Home is the place you live, not a place someone puts on a paper and calls your home.

If you live long in Japan you have overstayed your welcome and start getting questions like 1) Are you still in Japan after a long time. or when are you leaving ?

I never get these questions. Literally never.

They don't like foreigners to know so much about the Japanese

This isn't even remotely true in my experience. On the contrary, when consulting, they pay me a lot of money because I know about the Japanese.

Utter rubbish. How long can that be.? You must be living in your little cocoon and have not really interacted with Japanese people during your so called long stay.

I have only been here about half as long as Cleo, but I spend the majority of most days with Japanese people. On top of that, I speak Japanese at an advanced level.

And one thing I find in pretty much every case where someone makes claims like yours is that they don't really speak Japanese so well, which I am quite sure is why they come to these baseless conclusions like you have.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Fact cheack: if you're not Japanese, you have no say in the matter. 'Mkay? You managing to live here without breaking the laws thanks to your degrees and diligent work does not relate in any way to a child whose only criminal act was that that he was born. He hasn't broken the law!

ebisen, you seem to have your wires crossed. I am the one who is arguing that having a university degree should have very little bearing on a Japanese visa compared to some poor teenager who was born and schooled here for 16 years. I was arguing against the poster who claimed that his university degree put him ahead in the queue. Please read my posts properly.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Dirty tactics by the Japanese Immigration. Should have at least told both mother and son to leave at same time rather than keeping the poor kid's hopes up. Japan is clueless about matters regarding law. Probably waiting to see what Trump and Republicans will do with immigration in US. Japan has no creativity or mindset about legal issues. They can only modify what's been created by other countries' judicial system. In that sense, Japan is far from "developed".

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Japan is governed by laws; laws are made to be followed by citizens and foreigner

All countries have laws and the intent is always that the law should be followed.

Does that mean once cannot criticize the law? Of course not. Only a brainwashed person would think the law is above criticism.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Terrible decision by the courts.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Sorry to this boy but he will never be accepted by Japanese society. Worse than Korean dependents in Jjappan..

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

toshiko: Sorry to this boy but he will never be accepted by Japanese society. Worse than Korean dependents in Jjappan..

Well, but he is Japanese already. Same like Japanese born in America. Their blood is Japanese but their culture is American. With more or less of an overlay depending on how much Japanese culture that's been passed down to them from the parental environment. My Chinese friends are first-generation Japanese citizens, their kids to the eye are totally Japanese, got the mod clothing, hairstyle, mannerisms, all that. How not, raised in Japanese schools?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

@turbo: you can't compare Japan and US I assume you meant america as USA. If not. which America?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If law requires a visa...he must have a visa.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

He will be happier in Thai than Japan. Japanese society is not ideal for him look at how Korean peoppleare treated in Japan. In Thai, he has mom...

2 ( +3 / -1 )

If they did allow him to stay in Japan he would regret his decision when he is older. 90% of Japanese people I have met who have lived abroad would rather not be in Japan.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Japanese abandoned in China during the war were raised Chinese. They'd love to return, but the Japanese gov't won't allow it. Kids of foreign parents born and raised in Japan aren't wanted. So, what's left? Born and raised Japanese is ALL important. Pity. Same word the PM uses when things don't go his way.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

talaraedokkoDEC. 13, 2016 - 09:35AM JST

Japanese abandoned in China during the war were raised Chinese. They'd love to return, but the Japanese gov't won't allow it.

No. It was Communist Chinese government that disallowed those Japanese to go bakc to their homeland for decades. Japanese government welcomed their return and gave them money to restart their lives in Japan when Communist China changed its policy and released them.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Unfortunitly this happens in many country's and the children just dont know. They end up getting sent back to their country of heritige without really knowing that country. I do think many country's need to relook at these children case by case. They should set them on a path to become a citizen, especially if they only know that country's language n writing.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If the kid was born in JAPAN doesn't that count for anything?? He speaks japanese,goes to japanese school,but they want to send him back to a country he probably doesn't even know,and not even because he committed a crime or anything.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is just ridiculous. Why does this boy need to be punished when he didn't do anything wrong. He has the right to live in the country he was born, and Japanese authority should exercise more discretion on this case. Japan is rapidly losing its populations and instead of bringing all these workers from S.E.Asia and teach them Japanese (that works too), why can't we allow people like this boy who is a contributing Japanese resident to remain in Japan?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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