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Crack in Osaka train's undercarriage prompts 'serious incident' probe

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The railway operator, which had found a similar-sized crack on another train in April

And what became of this? Did they fix it? Did they warn the attendants about the possibility of another crack?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

like everywhere, the infrastructure is suffering entropy.... stuff's getting old and decrepit....

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Every time I read articles like this I wonder if it related to the scandal at Kobe Steel, with them falsifying testing data for decades. They supply a large number of industries in Japan.

Toyota/Subaru have also had huge issues with valve springs breaking prematurely due to poor steel.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-kobe-steel-scandal-ceo/kobe-steel-admits-data-fraud-went-on-nearly-five-decades-ceo-to-quit-idUSKBN1GH2SM

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There is nothing wrong with age as long as it is maintained. Most municipal buildings, waiting rooms and school buildings are dire. Will they stand up to a major quaker?

The most disgusting part about city shiyakusha etc. are the horrid smells emanating from the old toilets, and the total lack of privacy when using them.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Bungle

Aircraft have undercarriages. Trains have bogies.

All vehicles have undercarriages. It is a term derived originally from horse-drawn carriages.

Train undercarriages may be called bogies. But, they are still undercarriages.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Scary, I ride that line daily and also the Rapit train when in a rush.

Hopefully now all the Nankai trains will get a thourough look over

0 ( +1 / -1 )

DisillusionedToday 10:58 am JST

There was a similar incident last year with another rapid train having a large crack in its undercarriage. Just built it and let it go seems to be a very common scenario in Japan. Public schools, nuclear power plants, government buildings and more. They are all just built and left to rot with only minimal maintenance. My local city hall is a disgustingly old and dirty building filled with cheap antique office furnishings (despite paying stupid amounts of city tax). Japanese public schools are also disgusting. They haven't been touched since they were built except replacing blackboards and desks (a few at a time). They haven't had a coat of paint or any refurbishing since they were built 30-40 years ago. Most schools still have those horrid pit toilets. The trains are no different. Many of them were built 50 or more years ago and are just minimally maintained to keep them on the tracks. TIJ!

I agree most schools and public buildings are an oddly grimy affair, but I'm a bit puzzled you seem to believe cities offset a large portion of tax income for upgrading their furniture.

Also trains are certainly not running for fifty years, nearly all trains operating in Kanto are less than 15 years old and the infrastructure is gone over every single night. There are hardly accidents that don't involved people getting in front of trains in some way or another and the rest can hardly be blamed on poor maintenance.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Aircraft have undercarriages. Trains have bogies.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

shiyakusha

I agree, City Office Workers often do emanate horrid smells.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Actually aircraft also have bogies, they're a set of wheels with integrated suspension sitting on the end of the landing gear leg on larger aircraft

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There was a similar incident last year with another rapid train having a large crack in its undercarriage. Just built it and let it go seems to be a very common scenario in Japan. Public schools, nuclear power plants, government buildings and more. They are all just built and left to rot with only minimal maintenance. My local city hall is a disgustingly old and dirty building filled with cheap antique office furnishings (despite paying stupid amounts of city tax). Japanese public schools are also disgusting. They haven't been touched since they were built except replacing blackboards and desks (a few at a time). They haven't had a coat of paint or any refurbishing since they were built 30-40 years ago. Most schools still have those horrid pit toilets. The trains are no different. Many of them were built 50 or more years ago and are just minimally maintained to keep them on the tracks. TIJ!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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