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Debris recovery operation in sea carried out for first time since Fukushima nuclear disaster

11 Comments

For the first time since the 2011 nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, the removal of debris in seawater located up to 20 km from the plant site has finally started.

The recovery operation, which began Monday, focuses on the removal of rubble in seawater within 5 to 20 km of the wrecked plant, Sankei Shimbun reported.

Five and a half years after the disaster, fishing has yet to be carried out in these waters while tsunami debris on the ocean floor near the Fukushima plant has remained untouched.

With an aim to start trial fishing operations within this targeted cleanup area, the Soma-Futaba Fisheries Cooperative Association employed 32 fishing boats to recover debris such as driftwood and gill nets on Monday.

Following suit, from Tuesday, the Iwaki City Fisheries Cooperative Association started debris removal operations and will continue the cleanup efforts until February of next year.

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11 Comments
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Would that stir up the radioactive materials, if any?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I personally Would not eat Fish caught near Any Nuclear Facility .

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Better late than never... but I would not want to eat fish from that region either.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Better late than never... but I would not want to eat fish from that region either

We probably are eating them unwillingly (just waiting for the next mislabeling scandal to flare up).

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Even though water is a great isolator of radioactive material the half life of such material is 30 years. So they should not start fishing there for at least another 25 years.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I have no problem with the removal of the debris, but I wonder how they plan on teaching the fish that wander into the area to STAY in that area?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Even though water is a great isolator of radioactive material the half life of such material is 30 years. So they should not start fishing there for at least another 25 years.

At which time, half of the original radioactive material will still remain.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Even though water is a great isolator of radioactive material the half life of such material is 30 years. So they should not start fishing there for at least another 25 years.

Think of dropping a single drop of blood into a swimming pool. Initially, it would be highly concentrated, and you would see it very clearly where it landed. But liquid molecules are in constant movement, and the longer you watched that drop of blood, the more it would disperse, until you couldn't see it at all, it would just be diluted among the whole pool.

Now imagine if that pool was the size of one of the great lakes in North America, and you were still working with a drop of blood.

That is what the radioactive water going into the ocean is like. It dilutes and dilutes and dilutes further and further. It doesn't just collect in one spot and sit there.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

No it doesn't! You are assuming that radioactive material is water soluble. And you are also assuming that radioactive material floats perfectly in water to be dispersed.

Start with an analysis of what was blasted out of the reactor (educate yourself) and your points may have some validity......

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Politicians, trying to minimize their errors, want the local folk to be the guinea pigs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No it doesn't! You are assuming that radioactive material is water soluble. And you are also assuming that radioactive material floats perfectly in water to be dispersed.

Your point is valid, though I think Strangerland was only thinking about the radioactive water still spewing from the crippled reactors. Any irradiated material that couldn't be suspended in water would not disperse. I would think, however, that the amount of radioactive non-suspendable matter in the waters near Daiichi would be relatively low considering the prevailing winds on the days the reactors exploded were to the North-North-West, over land. Since then the only additional radioactivity being injected into the ocean has been via leaking cooling water and ground water irradiated as it flows past the reactors.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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