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Drunk ANA flight attendant causes 4 domestic flights to be delayed in Fukuoka

28 Comments

A female flight attendant for All Nippon Airways (ANA) caused delays in the departures of four domestic flights from Fukuoka Airport after she was found to be over the legal alcohol limit before boarding.

According to a statement from ANA on Saturday, the flight attendant in her 20s was scheduled to board a flight from Fukuoka to Narita Airport on Friday morning, Fuji TV reported. However, she tested positive for alcohol during a pre-boarding inspection.

The airline was forced to switch crew members, which delayed a total of four flights — three of which were heading to Haneda Airport in Tokyo. Those flights were delayed up to 25 minutes.

According to ANA regulations, cabin crew are prohibited from consuming alcohol 24 hours before a flight instead of 12 hours which used to be the policy. The airline said the cabin attendant had been drinking the night before.

The mandatory alcohol test was carried out before flight NH2124 was scheduled to depart at 7:20 a.m. on Jan 3. After the test, taken at 6:30 a.m., showed that the woman had 0.14 milligrams of alcohol per liter on her breath, a scramble to replace her caused planes to be delayed.

The flight attendant reportedly told ANA that she had been drinking shochu (distilled liquor) with a friend at a restaurant in Fukuoka on Thursday night. She apologized and regretted “being careless” for violating the airline’s regulations.

© Japan Today

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28 Comments
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At least it wasn't a pilot this time.

17 ( +17 / -0 )

Hardly inebriated...

11 ( +16 / -5 )

She wasn’t drunk...

8 ( +13 / -5 )

in my years of experience, you can also go over the limit of alcohol if you

use mouth wash , after washing your teeth!

1 ( +5 / -4 )

That seems pretty high. I guess she is new to the job and didn't realize that shochuu will show up the next day on her breath, or maybe it is self-sabotage and she wants to quit. I worked in a JP high school back in the day and my friend, a JP teacher, used to strongly smell of alcohol in the mornings when I met him with still red face and mild drunkenness. He drank shochuu every day saying it was the cheapest spirit. I wonder if it metabolizes differently because I don't think beer causes the same next day appearance of drunkenness.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Seems to me that if she was drinking Thursday evening and had her test at 06:30 Friday, she was breaking the old rules let alone the new.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

The airline was forced to switch crew members, which delayed a total of four flights — three of which were heading to Haneda Airport in Tokyo. Those flights were delayed up to 25 minutes.

Switching one person can cause delayed four flights? Just replace her with other backup crew or ANA just doesn't have enough backup crew.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Sakurasaki, airlines normally only have crews standing by at the biggest hubs. They probably had to have someone come in from home or a hotel which takes time. So they opted to rotate crews from different flights to have these flights operate with a short delay rather than the one flight to be very delayed.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Does not sound as if she was drunk, and she is not a pilot. They could have let it slide.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

0,14 per mille ... that is hardly what you can call drunk ...

doubt anyone would have noticed, they could just have told her off afterwards instead of making a big deal out of it

0 ( +5 / -5 )

I care if pilots are drunk. If cabin attendants have had a drink, I don’t at all.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

I care if pilots are drunk. If cabin attendants have had a drink, I don’t at all.

You might care a little more if there was an emergency, maybe rapid decompression of the cabin or an engine explosion, and have to rely on the cabin attendants for assistance and directions.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

BungleToday  04:47 pm JST

She wasn’t drunk..

Indeed. The curious fact here is if she had driven and been stopped by Police she would have PASSED the driving breath alcohol test (0.15mg/L), even here in Japan, with its lower limit is than most of the world. You can drive in Australia with under 0.25mg/L and in the England or many parts of the USA with under 0.40mg/L. So drunk? I severely doubt she was even slightly tipsy or even had a hangover

But Yes, she was over the strict limit (which must be incredibly low- thanks to genuinely drunk pilots in the past) of her employers and in breach of her contract, but touche to the the juicy clickbait headline though.

breath and blood numbers are different- rule of thumb: divide the blood (mg/l) by 5 and that will give you the BAC % that many are used to. So the lady at 0.14mg/l was less than 0.03% BAC
7 ( +7 / -0 )

Whether she was or wasn't inebriated, rules are made for a reason

1 ( +4 / -3 )

The rule says 24 hours and she admitted to less, so she broke the rule.

However... 0.14mg/L BAC is barely negligible. Hardly warranted to use the word "drunk" in the headline.

That's either clickbait, or very poor research/editing.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Just for clarity, 0.08 is considered the legal limit in Japan for drunk driving.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

I doubt her level of inebriation would have had much of an effect on her job performance even in an emergency. But rules are rules.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It is a little known fact that if the pilot, co-pilot and flight engineer are all taken ill...

The flight attendants have to take over the flying.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

MrKipling:

The flight attendants have to take over the flying.

Seriously? Do you have a source for that?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

And If the flight attendants are also taken ill, passengers sitting in row 1 will take over.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

They should've given her a bloody mary and told her to get on with it.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@kipling, as a pilot that must be something that even we don’t know. And when was the last time you saw a flight engineer?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Nothing new. Anything can happen with Ana.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They all know they are subject to random testing but they are typically only tested if outward signs of inebriation or diminished capacity are in evidence. Chances are most of the crew routinely carry trace levels like 0.15mg/L on every flight.

She is either very unlucky or somebody said something.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Seriously? Do you have a source for that?

Jesus...Is sarcasm dead?

No, I’m making light of the fact that a glorified drink server has had a drink the day before serving drinks on a plane.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Random, if you really are a pilot it is disturbing to hear you don't know there are loads of aviation-related things that "even" you don't know. And a working Flight Engineer died on Bashkirian Airlines flight 2937. That was July 1st, 2002.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Breaking the rules is a no-no, but suggesting in the repugnant headline the attendant was drunk is also a big no-no.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

theFuJan. 5  10:49 pm JST

Just for clarity, 0.08 is considered the legal limit in Japan for drunk driving.

Sorry to inform you that 0.03 is the legal limit here--not 0.08

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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