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Essential workers taking risks despite harassment during virus crisis

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The cure seems worse than the disease.

Is it really necessary to revamp all of society?

-23 ( +13 / -36 )

Brave workers.

We should remember them on International Workers Day.

27 ( +31 / -4 )

The cure seems worse than the disease.

Tell that to the families of those who have died from the virus.

15 ( +29 / -14 )

It just shows that people in any society can be selfish idiots when put under a little bit of stress - the veneer come off and the ugly truth emerges.

32 ( +33 / -1 )

Time to end this lockdown, it has run its course. All its down now is creating anger and further havoc on the economy.

-22 ( +8 / -30 )

We should remember them on International Workers Day.

Fully agree. And they've shown how essential they are to the economy and the profits of the businesses they work for.

Given their essentiality, wouldn't it be nice to think in the post-pandemic era corporations will recognize these worker's value and increase their salaries and benefits plus improve their working conditions.

20 ( +24 / -4 )

Biting the hand that feeds you, never ends well. The same people to mistreat these worker are the first ones to complain when there is no one left to serve them.

23 ( +23 / -0 )

These essential workers don't need your salutes, thoughts and prayers and commemorations. They need business and politicians to ensure they have living wages.

19 ( +21 / -2 )

Close contact is defined as being within one meter for 15 minutes without masks.

I appreciate their hard work for low wages and am always say ありがとう,

But they are not selling rice balls on the beachs at Normandy.

If things don't pick up soon I would think twice about doing any of these jobs.

-17 ( +1 / -18 )

The same people to mistreat these worker are the first ones to complain when there is no one left to serve them.

Definately....how many times have we seen oyajis having a fit about  service in a supermarket or conbini...even before corona.

These essential workers don't need your salutes, thoughts and prayers and commemorations. They need business and politicians to ensure they have living wages.

Well said, govt should mandate their wages increase to express some appreciation not just words.

Given their essentiality, wouldn't it be nice to think in the post-pandemic era corporations will recognize these worker's value and increase their salaries and benefits plus improve their working conditions

Spot on.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

May 1st International Labor Day. Many of these workers deserve better wages and conditions. Going forward needs new thinking.

Too many people take these type of workers for granted. I always say thank you to acknowledge them.

13 ( +14 / -1 )

the essential workers should be looked as heroes during this time.

they are risking every minute they are out serving the public.

and those who mistreat them can go to he.l

14 ( +14 / -0 )

It just shows that people in any society can be selfish idiots when put under a little bit of stress - the veneer come off and the ugly truth emerges.

And other people are the opposite. Start adding “otsukaresama” with service workers.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The negative and sad effects of omotenashi culture. The server has fewer human rights.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

"...post offices have been closed after staff tested positive with the virus"

Really? Where? Have the infections been traced?

This is pretty big news on its own.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I really wish there was a lot more common sense on these isles than is usually present.

Also a lot of this is DIRECTLY related to J-society, the good ole sempi-kohai  thing, it have always been amazed at how quick people relish being the sempi while at a restaurant or some other service, this article reeks of sempi abuse, I mean lets face it that is what sempi-kohai is too often, bullying, instead of mentoring sadly

5 ( +5 / -0 )

This doesn’t only apply to Japan, but if only there was a competent government that was in control of the situation and implementing necessary and sensible precautions instead of just letting businesses and workers gamble with their financial and physical health.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

But they are not selling rice balls on the beachs at Normandy.

If things don't pick up soon I would think twice about doing any of these jobs.

I'd thing twice about serving the kind of customers who look down on those who work in retail or lower paid jobs.

Perhaps the wealthier posters here who likes to promote their financial health have some concrete advice to the rest of us?

10 ( +10 / -0 )

The cure seems worse than the disease.

Is it really necessary to revamp all of society?

Burning Bush, you have have been the voice of reason on these articles over the past few months. You've talked a lot of sense. But here I disagree with you a bit, I think society does need to be revamped in the light of this disease, and others.

If people can practice good hygiene in public spaces, in supermarkets, etc, most of society can indeed carry on as normal. Rather than locking everything down and causing a global recession, mass unemployment, and even possible starvation for millions, governments around the world should have kept the economy going but focused help towards those most vulnerable, and insisted on good hygiene elsewhere.

And, going forward, it is clear that huge structural changes are needed - to wean the world off its dependence on China, to establish decent health care systems in places that don't have them, to protect the environment, and to provide greater job security for all.

But yes, instead, the press went out of control with its panic-mongering, politicians were terrified of looking like they did nothing, and now we have the crazy situation of millions of perfectly healthy people sitting at home in fear of a disease that is very unlikely to harm them, that has caused fewer deaths than caused by malaria, smoking, unclean water, or any number of diseases, and a global slump on the horizon that makes the future look very bleak indeed.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

Respect and thank you to all the workers helping to keep what's left of the economy running. Shame on anyone putting another down due to their position, lack of experience or education. Ignorance is not bliss, it's ugly.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

@toasted hetic

Sorry typo

If things don't pick up soon I wouldn't think twice about doing any of these jobs

I have done minimum paid work before and would do it again if I have to.

I appreciate the work service workers do and would happily pay more to increase their wages .

But to make out they are risking their lifes working on the cash register is an overstatement

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

People in public facing roles are often looked down on or treated like scum by society in general. There should be zero tolerance approach to unacceptable behaviour like this. I would ban them from the shop.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Shame on anyone putting another down due to their position, lack of experience or education. Ignorance is not bliss, it's ugly."

Indeed...unfortunately there are plenty of arrogant & rude customers in most countries  ( especially but not exclusively of the pompous oyaji variety ). Start abusing staff , be shown the door and told to take your business elsewhere I say.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Essential workers need a salary increase and CEOs need a salary cut.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

But to make out they are risking their lifes working on the cash register is an overstatement

With respect, you'd be surprised.

Never mind the obvious scenarios where one is coughed upon, or exposed dozens of times a day and night by unwitting customers, drivers and delivery personnel.

There's also the joys of having a knife pulled on you. Cleaning up after a drunk has let loose, or having abuse spat at you.

And that's just the tip of the iceberg.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

I would ban them from the shop.

Ideally, sure. But it's not down to the flood staff, usually. That kind of decision lies with the management. Who are not always concerned with the well-being of their employees.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

My deepest respect for all these people working in establishments like combiny or supermarkets facing daily discrimination,indeed all the other activities like silly Pachinko or normal shops should remain closed but in this case without staff working in the food industry how can we even survive?

How selfish and ungrateful can be some old people in this country.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It’s beyond me why one would treat a store employee badly unless you like to embarrass yourself in public. The other day I read the comments regarding this unsavory behavior from readers on a Japanese news site. A former (Japanese) worker at a konbini near an airport said that western people were pleasant to deal with, usually responding with a smile or a “hi!”. Chinese people were loud, couldn’t wait in line and left the toilet filthy, but Chinese always treated them as equals. The worst he said were Japanese (not everybody I’m sure!), who would look down on them, were rude and complained about everything.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

many workers at its member stores have reported that they are "worn out due to customer complaints"

I don't complain about the workers. They are doing a TREMENDOUS job of what they are paid to do. I fully respect that as should everyone else.

I do complain about these "customers" that ruin it for everyone. Not to stereotype, but they are usually Japanese "grown men."

For example the typical old retired guy and his buddy trying to smoke or get a drink and making a huge "complaint" when there's nothing really to complain about besides themselves.

But just the other day at the combini, some construction workers just got off and there was a group of them. I get it, they are tired from work and need a drink. So be it, you guys earned it, go for it!

(It would be a lot more realistic if they just bought a couple of six packs in coolers for miller time. But that's a whole different story.)

Anyway, their "leader" I guess, you know the loudest and coolest guy of the bunch, comes in coughing up a storm. No mask. Opens up the refrigerator, blows a bunch of dramatic coughs. Lines up behind me, is ready yo cough, thankfully the other register opens up first and he changes lines. Of course midway, let's off more rounds of droplets.

Yeah, thanks guy. You were so manly!

I'm sure the workers have a plethora of customers and stories that definitely make life difficult. I mean I was just in the store for about 3 minutes, and I was very irritated as it was.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

A PAY RAISE, or BONUS is the perfect to thank these workers.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Limit the # of customers allowed inside the store at a time. For example, only 20 customers inside the store at a time - the next customer only goes in when a previous customer goes out

Encourage curb-side pickup instead. Customers order ahead of time, then pick up their orders outside in their cars without having to go inside the store

that has caused fewer deaths than caused by malaria, smoking, unclean water, or any number of diseases

Do ya see malaria overwhelming a healthcare system? Do ya see smokers ovewhelming a hospital?

Think about that

It's not just the # that gets critically ill - it's the # that gets critically ill in a short amount time

1,000 ill patients in a matter of months - a hospital can handle

1,000 ill patients in a matter of weeks - a hospital is overwhelmed. Resulting in even more people die than should be because the hospital can't adequately serve all those patients. As someone else said - it's the difference between being treated in a hospital room vs. in a hospital parking lot (because all the rooms are full)

That's the whole point of flattening the curve - the same # of people get infected, but it's spread out over a longer period of time, so the healthcare system doesn't get overwhelmed; and less people die because the healthcare workers can serve each patient adequately

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Treating essential workers with less than great respect is not right. Personally, I go out of my way to thank them for what they are doing. As I go in and out of the hospital I show my respect and thank people for working hard for all of us. Thank you for your service!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

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