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EU launches new website to introduce European literature to Japan

5 Comments

The Delegation of the European Union (EU) to Japan has launched eubungaku.jp, a new website enabling Japanese bibliophiles and publishing professionals to explore the thriving, multi-cultural literary landscape of the EU.

The website plays a central role in narrating eu:rope, a new EU-funded initiative launched on November 23 to give Japanese audiences a close-up view of the latest in European literature and new books published in Japanese by European authors.

A key objective is to enable Japanese publishing professionals to easily find information on book fairs, awards, residency programs, and more within the EU’s 27 Member States from a single resource, rather than through time-consuming online research across multiple website and languages. Users can quickly access a wide range of literature-related information for each Member State via an interactive map on the top page.

The striking design is the work of Dai Nippon Type Organization, a Tokyo-based experimental typography group specializing in re-configuring elements of the Japanese characters and alphabet.

Haitze Siemers, minister and deputy head of the Delegation of the European Union to Japan, commented: “With eubungaku.jp, we have sought to bring the literary communities in the EU and Japan closer together. For authors, translators, and publishers in Japan who are looking to get connected to the European literature scene, this website really is a one-of-a-kind resource.”

Available in both Japanese and English, the website will be continually updated with new interviews and articles throughout 2024 and beyond.

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5 Comments
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I have never seen one of my coworkers reading an actual book. They all read childish comics. Not sure this will be very popular in Japan.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

EU is currently stopping/censoring literature, so how will this make a big impact on the Japanese understanding of free speech?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I have never seen one of my coworkers reading an actual book. They all read childish comics. Not sure this will be very popular in Japan.

You only know what your co-workers read, but there are many Japanese people who read literature books, the fact that you don't know them is another matter.. Do you feel morally superior to your co-workers because they read manga???.. How does it affect you that others are happy reading what they like??..

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I have never seen one of my coworkers reading an actual book. They all read childish comics. Not sure this will be very popular in Japan.

Manga is a form of literature. Depending of the tittle though, but many manga author(s) usually do an extensive research related to the theme of the manga they are creating. So there is a LOT of information that one can learn from manga.

You may have this image of comic books (specifically DC and Marvel), but manga and other comic books can be as much educational as any "traditional" book.

My recomendation aside of what already TokyoLiving told you would be, to try as much as you should, to reform your "White man is wise and correct" narrative, it is wrong and childish.

On the lighter side, I don't like the web page design... too flashy colours....

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I know a few people who studied English literature at university.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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