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Evacuation order lifted in last of 6 impacted Fukushima areas

15 Comments

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15 Comments
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Just because the Gov lifted the evacuation orders does not mean the area is safe. Don't drink the water

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Lifting the ban on small areas and not whole towns makes it difficult to know exactly where they are. In these places, the infrastructures have been destroyed or collapsed, and without those, it becomes very difficult living there.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

 just three households made up of seven total people have applied for overnight stays

You cannot expect that people who were forced to leave more than ten years ago will come back quickly.

If you are living such a long time away from your home you might already found another permanent place to live, another job to do...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Its safe to go back until it isn’t

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Most of the returnees to these areas are very old people who just want to live out their days where they were born or possibly spent a large part of their lives. Any young people going back there must have a cancer wish or maybe having deformed kids.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Obviously radionuclides are false, don’t effect humans, animals, fish and nature. People still don’t get it that the world is flat with a few hills and valleys.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

A map of those areas would be useful.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Perhaps some of the stuff we hear about nuclear disaster areas isn't accurate. We're told that if a nuclear plant melts down or a nuclear bomb goes off, the area will be uninhabitable for thousands of years. When the Fukushima plant blew up, that's what we were told about these areas, yet here we are. We're told the same thing would happen if a bomb were dropped, yet people have been living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki again for decades with no issue.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I went there the other day, and this was basically the forest that was closed

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The zone is, in principle, inaccessible due to high levels of radiation.

Welcome back, government provide some extra radiation to residents in exchange for PR content.

-9 ( +7 / -16 )

In the wake of the nuclear disaster, the government imposed a "difficult-to-return" zone across a 337-square-kilometer area of Fukushima straddling seven municipalities. The zone is, in principle, inaccessible due to high levels of radiation.

So, why isn’t the irradiated water from the plant being stored there instead of dumping it into the ocean?

You have to feel very sorry for the people who were displaced by this man made meltdown. They have not been fully compensated for being displaced and now they are expected to return to towns that have become overrun with feral animals and have no infrastructure.

-8 ( +8 / -16 )

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