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Famed Tokyo sushi restaurant Jiro dropped from Michelin gourmet guide

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When a Japanese restaurant makes the Michelin Guide, that pretty much moves it off my list. Here come the tourist hordes, up go the prices, down goes the quality.

13 ( +21 / -8 )

The restaurant is run by sushi maestro Jiro Ono, well into his 90s, helped by his eldest son Yoshikazu.

Come on! Over exaggeration? Just because it costs 40,000 a meal for the "chef's selection" does not make the guy who makes it a "maestro"!

10 ( +23 / -13 )

Overrated.

You can get sushi just as good at a fraction of the cost at the many dozens of conveyor belt sushi restaurants located throughout Tokyo.

-21 ( +17 / -38 )

You can get sushi just as good at a fraction of the cost at the many dozens of conveyor belt sushi restaurants located throughout Tokyo.

No you can't.

16 ( +32 / -16 )

It's raw fish...just cut and slap on rice.

-17 ( +20 / -37 )

Definitely not the best sushi.

5 ( +17 / -12 )

No you can't.

You most certainly can.

-8 ( +22 / -30 )

You most certainly can.

No. You can't.

6 ( +23 / -17 )

Of course whether or not a kaitenzushi restaurant is 'just as good' is going to be subjective, and it's an argument that no one can ever win as a result because it's essentially an argument of 'no, my opinion is correct'.

But, it's basically the difference between a McDonald's hamburger and Kobe beef. Both are delicious, but it's silly to think they are the same. Kaitenzushi restaurants are buying in bulk to feed masses, doing it as quickly and affordably as possible. Jiro's restaurant is going to the fish market daily, choosing the best fish of the day, buying the best rice, and preparing it all with proper care.

That has to me been supported in my experience eating many times at both kaitenzushi and proper sushi restaurants.

13 ( +24 / -11 )

The restaurant is run by sushi maestro Jiro Ono, well into his 90s, helped by his eldest son Yoshikazu.

The restaurant is run by Yoshikazu and has been for years. Jiro Ono helps by presiding over the service, a role he had already assumed in his mid-80s. Thus he continued to give the restaurant his name and its cache. Once he passes, it's not even guaranteed that Yoshikazu who will inherit won't lose his clientele because "it isn't Jiro anymore." It hasn't been Jiro for a long time as anyone who has seen Jiro Dreams of Sushi can attest.

17 ( +18 / -1 )

Sadly there are FAR, FAR, too many people, Japanese and foreigners who come here alike, that somehow get the idea, like they are brainwashed, that price/cost equals value and great taste, and it isnt just sushi either!

There are PLENTY of sushi places throughout Tokyo that are of high quality and are a fraction of the price!

Some even go round and round!

16 ( +27 / -11 )

Can Ono senior tell the difference between maguro and tai now?

At 90 years things are not what they used to be..

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

No sushi is worth ¥40,000 sitting on a hard wooden stool at the bar. Where is the luxury I would expect for such a price? More cost does not always mean more taste. Is a bottle of sake at ¥5,000 twice has good has one at ¥2,500?

In restaurants if you want wine always order the cheapest bottle on the menu.

6 ( +19 / -13 )

I am not a sushi connoisseur so I can't begin to act as if I know what I am searching for in taste when I eat sushi. But I've eaten as Masa in New York as well as a few high end sushi places in Japan. The best sushi I've ever had is Sushi-Ro. I honestly see no reason to pay ¥40,000 for sushi or fight for a table at an exclusive restaurant when I am perfectly happy with the ¥100 plates at Sushi-Ro.

10 ( +14 / -4 )

No sushi is worth ¥40,000 sitting on a hard wooden stool at the bar.

zichi, I've said it before about a jillion times and I'll say it again because it's true -

Something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

Something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it.

Quite so. Here is is a matter of just how much media attention you can attract to "raise" your prices and get the people to think that you are serving a quality product, even when it really isnt!

5 ( +9 / -4 )

do blindfold tests to determine if pros really can tell the difference, it's been done with sommeliers and they couldn't

13 ( +16 / -3 )

Well, opinions are subjective but the restaurant got triple Michelin stars since 2007 so it must be quite good. Personally 40000 is a little too much. I rather have a nice 10000 yen dinner and spend the rest on something else.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

I am not a sushi connoisseur so I can't begin to act as if I know what I am searching for in taste when I eat sushi. But I've eaten as Masa in New York as well as a few high end sushi places in Japan. The best sushi I've ever had is Sushi-Ro. I honestly see no reason to pay ¥40,000 for sushi or fight for a table at an exclusive restaurant when I am perfectly happy with the ¥100 plates at Sushi-Ro.

I agree with that. I went to IZU around 10 years back to experience some really good sushi, looked up a famous sushi place on the net, and found it to be just more of the same. My wife and I left the shop and went to Hamazushi and had a better dining experience than the expensive one. So yes, in my experience, kaiten sushi can be better than the expensive stuff.

I don't believe the hype. But to each his own. If someone wants to spend more on Sushi and think they are getting something better, then ok. More power to ya. Not for me..

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Easy to see from this thread who knows their stuff about sushi and who doesn't have a clue!

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Michelin restaurants are generally over hyped and very, very expensive.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

I think... at the end of the day... he doesn't care. They good and bad being in michelin book.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

*there's good and bad being in michelin book.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Better to go to Kyubey in Ginza

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it.

Occasionally I do agree with you Serrano.

Value is determined when a buyer and seller agree upon a price for an item. If a seller prices it too high, it will not sell, and therefore does not have that value. If a buyer isn't willing to pay enough, the seller will not sell it, and therefore it does not have that value. Once the two agree upon a price, value is set, at least within the circumstances under which the transaction occurred.

'Worth' is a personal perspective on what price one would be willing to pay. That's why some people can say that 40,000 yen for a sushi dinner is not worth it, while others will say it is. Both are correct, as whether or not the cost is "worth it", is subjective.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

For those who think kaitenzushi is as good as a proper sushi restaurant, why is it you suppose they don't charge the same prices? Or something more in line with the high cost places?

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Sushi Zo in Roppongi is excellent for an intimate sushi experience. The aged fish they serve is fantastic.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

YubaruToday  07:48 am JST

Sadly there are FAR, FAR, too many people, Japanese and foreigners who come here alike, that somehow get the idea, like they are brainwashed, that price/cost equals value and great taste, and it isnt just sushi either!

There are PLENTY of sushi places throughout Tokyo that are of high quality and are a fraction of the price!

Some even go round and round!

Yes. I doubt that Michelin eat at every single Mom and Pop (insert food style here) place in Tokyo and its suburbs. The Michelin Star system was originally born out of an idea of advising drivers where to go access good amenities like food and mechanics. Thus, it is a guide for well-heeled travelers, and the recommendations are more likely to come from Hotel Concierges etc, missing out the smaller less glamorous establishments which may also offer exceptional food at much lower prices.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Twice in my time here I have been taken to exclusive sushi restaurants with the price higher than ¥40,000, but I was the guest and didn't pay. One in Hakone which was exceptional with a river running through it. The comfort and service was luxury. The second was in Tokyo and less exceptional than the one in Hakone.

More recently we went to a nearby fishing port with a mama papa fish restaurant. The fish is caught locally. In the restaurant were pools of water with fresh live fish. For lunch we had sushi and several cooked fish plus rice, soup, other stuff. The price was ¥1300 each. We didn't drink alcohol. I will be going back to that one again. My two guests from Hiroshima were more than happy.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

@stranger - "For those who think kaitenzushi is as good as a proper sushi restaurant, why is it you suppose they don't charge the same prices? Or something more in line with the high cost places?"

So you equate price with quality. Really, really, really think about that.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

What I love about Japan in general and Tokyo in particular is that there is a sushi restaurant for every occasion, for every one, and for every occasion.

I have been to Jiro. Twice. It was a long, long time ago. It was awesome. That said, I have not been back and have never felt any compelling urge to do so.

That is no reflection on Jiro. It is just that there are so many truly amazing sushi restaurants all over this great country. I had a favorite upscale place in Nishi-Azabu which was similar to Jiro in that it could only seat 15~20 people and was basically an omakase menu place. It was intimate, the master was great, and the price was expensive but not outrageous. Not in the Jiro range.

But out in the chiho, there are so many great spots. Perhaps not with the same upscale ambience, but with sushi to die for. There is a great place in Niigata that just can't be beat. Fresh sushi paired with Niigata nihonshu...... just amazing.

All of this to say that Jiro is what it is. I do think it is wasted on those who have not enjoyed a lot of high quality sushi. But then again there are many sushi restaurants in Tokyo that are wasted on "novices".

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Once he passes, it's not even guaranteed that Yoshikazu who will inherit won't lose his clientele because "it isn't Jiro anymore."

No guarantee, but perhaps it will live on. Just look at Goro's in Shibuya; as he got older he wasn't making silver pieces anymore, a workshop was, and since his passing it hasn't take much of a hit in terms of popularity.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Twice in my time here I have been taken to exclusive sushi restaurants with the price higher than ¥40,000, but I was the guest and didn't pay. One in Hakone which was exceptional with a river running through it. The comfort and service was luxury. The second was in Tokyo and less exceptional than the one in Hakone.

Now to be fair, these ¥40,000 yen sushi places are not really about the food; they're about the host being able to show off to the guest how much money he makes, usually as part of a business dinner. So really these are places where bigwigs do business.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The subjective arguments are very interesting. I’ve had delicious fresh sushi at sushi train restaurants and I’ve had horrid smelly sushi at specialized restaurants. However, I fail to see how one dish could be worth ¥40,000, regardless of the quality and presentation. That’s just ludicrous.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

40,000 yen is way out of my budget but I bet the cuts of fish are thicker at Jiro than they are as 100 yen kaiten places. Costco in Toyama has better sushi than the 100 yen places.

Whether Jiro's is going to be significantly better than a 2500-3,000 yen a head place on the Japan Sea coast or in Hokkaido is questionable. Under 2500 a head probably cannot be done because good quality fresh fish is now too expensive. Even traditionally cheap seafood like squid is now expensive due to overfishing. With three kids, even 2500 a head is a special occasion for us.

This is the same with anything. Diminishing marginal returns. The more you pay, the less extra benefit you get with each extra yen to the point where you are paying for basically nothing.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

People have always paid for a name. Look at fashion brands. Look at designers. Regardless of the fact that you can get an amazing diamond in the diamond district in New York for a fraction of the cost, people prefer to overpay tiffany's for a diamond that is below the value paid because you want the name.

I remember going to Tiffany's and seeing a $12,000 ring that could only be insured for $10,000. But then went to the diamond district and got a $6,000 ring that I got insured for $25,000.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Two things I value in a restaurant: Good food and pleasant ambiance. Truly good restaurants have both.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Good decision!

If the place is only for the "privileged ones", those with connections and the money, it shouldn't be on the Michelin!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

It would have been interesting to get an opinion from these Celebrities after eating at Jiro Ono and a regular kaiten Zushi. It would be interesting to hear them make these comparisons. Most of us here haven't ate at Jiro Ono's, but definitely at a KaitenZ. That salmon Avocado/ spicy onion one from the kaiten Zushi places like Uobei etc are freakn delicious. So i might agree with people who talked about opinion and hype. A bottle of Jose Cuervo Tequilla costs 1800yen in a Supermarket, but the same bottle is 15000yen in a bar, just as a corona beer bottle is 200yen in store and 700yen at a bar. live within your means, do not be mislead. Eat the sushi which makes you happy :)! 100yen/40000!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Zichi and Yubaru are 100% on.

I have been many times to so called high end sushi places with actors and actresses, politicians and wann b money spenders. In my opinion the company were classless, had no clue about what they were really eating and referred to price as meaning good. So sad.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

For those who think kaitenzushi is as good as a proper sushi restaurant, why is it you suppose they don't charge the same prices? Or something more in line with the high cost places?

Because they dont waste their money on atmosphere! Far too many people, and it appears that includes you, are blinded by the glitter, as your wallet becomes lighter!

Not to mention on the way home you probably end up at some conbini because you are still hungry!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Yeah Jiro quit accepting reservations due to the growing number of no-shows from Chinese tourists who had made reservations.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it.

A ¥1 coin isn't worth ¥10,000.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Like most things in life, the law of diminishing returns comes into play. Sure, 40,000+ yen sushi is going to taste better than kaiten, but next to 10,000 yen sushi? Only a true coinosseur could tell the difference. It's the same with wine - a 2,000 yen bottle will taste a lot better than 500 yen vinegar, but an 8,000 yen bottle vs a 2,000 yen one, not so much.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There are a number of high end sushi ya's in Tokyo (and HK  and Singapore) that I would rate the quality alongside Jiro (where I have been once with a friend from overseas who booked 6 weeks ahead thru the hotel he was staying in).  Getting Michelined  is due to a number of factors - quality, atmosphere, price, buzz and LUCK.  To say Michelins are worthless is not true - plenty of places with them are fabulous culinary experiences.  but I have also been to a number of places without them that rank alongside those that have a star or 2......

1 ( +1 / -0 )

A ¥1 coin isn't worth ¥10,000.

Yet here is one that is worth well over $3,000.00 (US)

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1870-M3-Japan-Silver-1-Yen-Meiji-Era-MS-65-NGC-SKU-132101/112616089161?hash=item1a38712649:g:OeQAAOSwqi9dpoOl

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"We recognize Sukiyabashi Jiro does not accept reservations from the general public, which makes it out of our scope," said a spokeswoman from the Japanese branch of Michelin.

All the headlines are misleading because it implies it's because he's gone bad or something when really it should be something more neutral like 'not featured'. You can't be dropped from a list you're not on

0 ( +2 / -2 )

My parents always mention about going when they visit me but the mixed reviews puts me off from going. Things like a 30 minute time limit, chefs yelling at staff/customers and staff treating Japanese customers better than foreign ones is quite unappetizing for me.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

So you equate price with quality. Really, really, really think about that.

What?! You seem to have lost the topic of the conversation.

Others claimed that they can get kaitenzushi just as good as Jiro's restaurant. If the quality is the same, and Jiro can charge that much, then why aren't these shops charging as much as Jiro, or at least in that direction? This is a capitalist society after all. Are the kaitenzushi shops being charitable by selling their sushi so cheap?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@Yubaru

Silver is considered valuable and it's a rare earth metal. Also, the age is part of the reason its value is that high. The same way a piece of armor is highly valuable.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Now to be fair, these ¥40,000 yen sushi places are not really about the food; they're about the host being able to show off to the guest how much money he makes, usually as part of a business dinner. So really these are places where bigwigs do business.

This is kind of true, but misleading.

You're correct that people take clients to these shops to impress them. I do. And it works. But, read at face value, your comment would make it seem like these are just another shop with a high price. The ambience, quality of service, and quality of food however are (generally) top notch Japan-level awesomeness.

The clientele are people who want to show off what they can afford. They do this by taking their clients to something (in the case of a nice sushi restaurant) fancy and expensive.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Because they dont waste their money on atmosphere! Far too many people, and it appears that includes you, are blinded by the glitter, as your wallet becomes lighter!

Sure, I love a classy restaurant. One of my favorite things in the world.

Should my feelings be discounted because the things I like are not only the food?

If that's the case, then what is the point of good service at a restaurant? Shouldn't they just drop it on your table and say 'have at it' if the food tastes fine?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

A ¥1 coin isn't worth ¥10,000.

Really? There are no 1¥ coins with that value to collectors?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I am glad that the restaurant is being considerate of its aging owner.

I found most of this article very interesting however the need to mention famous people seemed tasteless and un needed. In Japan people are respected for who the are as people not as 'stars" I frankly respect the restaurant for upholding their own standards.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

 where the chef's selection starts at 40,000 yen..........

So who payed for that Obama-Abe ¥80,000+meal? Japanese or American tax payers?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The clientele are people who want to show off what they can afford. They do this by taking their clients to something (in the case of a nice sushi restaurant) fancy and expensive.

So the patrons are snobs. Figures.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I've eaten as Masa in New York as well as a few high end sushi places in Japan. The best sushi I've ever had is Sushi-Ro. I honestly see no reason to pay ¥40,000 for sushi or fight for a table at an exclusive restaurant when I am perfectly happy with the ¥100 plates at Sushi-Ro.

If the difference in taste to you isn't worth the difference in price, then you shouldn't. No doubt, Jiro is overpriced, and there are 100s of top sushi places that charge much less. And they are all better than Sushiro.

That said, if you are happy with Sushiro, why spend more? I used to drink expensive wines when I was younger, and became a bit of a snob. When I got older and had a family to spend the money on, I went back to my roots. I am perfectly happy with a 1200 yen bottle of these days. Sure, there is better wine, but not better enough to justify the expense. I appreciate an expensive wine when somebody else is paying, though.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@stranger - "then why aren't these shops charging as much as Jiro"

So restaurants should charge a high price because if you charge 40000 yen, you will still get the volume of customers that you would have if you had charged 4000. Really, really, really, really, really think about that.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I have been fortunate enough to eat sushi served by Jiro as well as my father and father before him. It is not the best "sushi" but does have great quality but does keep traditional atmosphere. Will I continue to eat there, No. IF the general common public is closed off then it is not a place for me. Humility is always best served when everyone is given an opportunity and not only a select few.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

IMHO, part of a great dining experience is not only the food but also the decor of the restaurant, the atmosphere of the restaurant and the attitude of the staff.

If I spend a lot of money, I want the whole package.

From what I can see, Sukiyabashi Jiro's decor makes it look like someone's front room. Nondescript sounds too kind for this restaurant.

I have also read that the atmosphere there is terrible. You have to eat in almost total silence, with what seems to be a time limit imposed for each piece of sushi!

Furthermore, it seems that the staff can be rude and arrogant at times.

I do find that the concept of "omotenashi" that the Japanese are always pushing seems to be far from the truth.

As an example, I took two friends from abroad to another sushi shop in Tokyo recently. It wasn't cheap. During our meal, the two chefs nearest us chatted frequently (in Japanese) and were snickering about their jokes. I am not saying they were laughing at us (I speak Japanese pretty well), but it created an unwelcoming atmosphere and seemed very unprofessional. Also, one of them was constantly sniffing and making other associated noises which I frankly thought was disgusting and enough to put me off my meal.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Others claimed that they can get kaitenzushi just as good as Jiro's restaurant. If the quality is the same, and Jiro can charge that much, then why aren't these shops charging as much as Jiro, or at least in that direction? This is a capitalist society after all. Are the kaitenzushi shops being charitable by selling their sushi so cheap?

This is based upon the assumption that Jiro's is "superior".

There are items he serves that one would not typically see at a kaiten-sushi, and that does not make the "quality" better, just different.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

JustAGoodOleBoyToday 01:43 pm JST

Yeah Jiro quit accepting reservations due to the growing number of no-shows from Chinese tourists who had made reservations.

Hmm. I am a specialist in luxury travel to Japan and I can tell you from frequent painful experience that the worst tourists for booking and then cancelling or no show are Americans. It is a constant battle for us to prevent them doing this. I've had American clients admit that they're used to booking 3 or 4 restaurants for a particular evening, then deciding on one of them on the night and simply no show at the others. This sort of attitude to restaurant bookings is common in the US and they bring their entitled attitude over to Japan. More and more restaurants are no longer accepting reservations from foreign tourists and this is definitely the major reason why.

I know that there are lots of Americans on this forum who will be indignant to hear this but it's true. Far too many "I'm a foodie!" Americans come to Japan and want to book dinner for every single night at a Michelin/famous restaurant so they can go home and tell their friends, but then change their mind on the day and cancel or no show. This is something I am dealing with every single week. I know that Chinese can be awful tourists but in my world (very high net worth clients), it's always the Americans who book and cancel restaurants without giving a flying F.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Hey people, don't mention or praise kaiten sushi too much because before we know it, it'll end up in the Michelin guide, then we're all done for

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The subjective arguments are very interesting. I’ve had delicious fresh sushi at sushi train restaurants and I’ve had horrid smelly sushi at specialized restaurants. However, I fail to see how one dish could be worth ¥40,000, regardless of the quality and presentation. That’s just ludicrous.

Agreed. But.m, we do live in a country we're a cantaloupe will sell for around $30k US.

Just over seven days left. You must feel like a five year old waiting for Christmas.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

The old Jiro Ono is not only a sushi maestro but also a master of hype and marketing. This article alone will surely make his restaurant more famous than it being included in the Michelin gourmet guide.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Do the hustleToday  10:37 am JST

I fail to see how one dish could be worth ¥40,000, regardless of the quality and presentation. That’s just ludicrous.

It's not "one dish". It's the Omakase Course, translated as Chef's Choice in the article. Of course I suppose you could put all the servings on one big plate and call it "one dish".

2 ( +4 / -2 )

So restaurants should charge a high price because if you charge 40000 yen, you will still get the volume of customers that you would have if you had charged 4000. Really, really, really, really, really think about that.

Um, law of economics. If the value is the same, then the price they charge at kaitenzushi could be raised significantly, as that is what people are willing to pay for that quality.

You keep saying 'really really really think about that', except that it doesn't appear you've really, really, really thought about it yourself, or understand market economics.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

If the cheapest set costs 40k yen, and they can only accept 10 customers, they've purposely put themselves in an unconvenient and un-customerfriendly position. They obviously could afford a bigger place and to train more expert staff. There is no respect in going to such a place where they only hype themselves for the sake of fame.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

A ¥1 coin isn't worth ¥10,000.

It might be worth even more, if it belonged to Emperor Hirohito or the like.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I have been to a few really expense joints in Tokyo, paid for by my business partners, and the Sushi was really really good.

The portions were perfect, the wasabi and soya sauce carefully measured, it was heavenly.

I have eaten Sushi in America a few times, my friends dragged me , and it was awful!!

Price might not equate quality, but experience can.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's silly to say that ¥100 "kurukuru" sushi is just as good as what one would get at Jiro. Seriously. Just think about it.

OTOH, yes, it's definitely possible to find something as good at a reasonably-priced sushi restaurant, where the owner also pays close attention to detail. ¥40,000 is ludicrous. There are probably hundreds of places to get a chef's selection as good as at Jiro for less than ¥5,000.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

 McDonald's hamburger and Kobe beef. Both are delicious

No they aren't. As you said, it's subjective.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

 I know that Chinese can be awful tourists but in my world (very high net worth clients), it's always the Americans who book and cancel restaurants without giving a flying F.

That's just rich people in general. Entitled a-holes.

They don't like to pay their bills either. "So sue me".

3 ( +4 / -1 )

It's not "one dish"

Of course it isn't. Only someone playing a semantics game to argue would assume that Do the hustle meant literally one dish.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Um, law of economics. If the value is the same, then the price they charge at kaitenzushi could be raised significantly, as that is what people are willing to pay for that quality.

Not necessarily, as Jiro built a reputation during the bubble, got more publicity, jacked his prices, got a Michelin rating and was, is, making money hand over foot, on an IMAGE, really nothing more, nothing less.

People go there for the ability to say they went, of course they are going to fawn all over the place and brag about the "quality", just like people go nuts here over Beaujolais Nouveau. It's swill to the rest of the civilized world, but to far too many Japanese, it's the greatest!

Seems to me you fell into the same trap of believing that "high prices" automatically means "high quality" and there by "value".

0 ( +1 / -1 )

If the cheapest set costs 40k yen, and they can only accept 10 customers, they've purposely put themselves in an unconvenient and un-customerfriendly position. They obviously could afford a bigger place and to train more expert staff. There is no respect in going to such a place where they only hype themselves for the sake of fame.

Jiro is the place that would rather have 10 customers paying 40,000, than 100 paying 4,000.

It's the reputation that keeps people coming.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It’s kind of ridiculous to go on about how good or bad this place is if you haven’t been there, isn’t it? Certainly if your philosophy is, “raw fish is raw fish,” you don’t need to go to an expensive sushi place.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I’ve had some expensive sushi and been back a few times to the restaurants, but was always put off by the ubiquitous cockroaches crawling across the wall or counter (after that ng!) -never had that in a kaiten yet...

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

When you're young, flush with more money than you know what to do with, these types of places are great to take a young Lady friend to. When you're older, and wiser, both you and your former young lady friend tend to be wiser and avoid such places as being a waste of money.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I've been to some extremely fine and high priced sushi restaurants in my time in Japan and have enjoyed the experience (as a guest). A lot of these ridiculously priced sushias are only about the reputation and presentation. In most cases it is pretty much the same as you get at a much cheaper restaurant and some of the better sushi train restaurants. However, when you go into a sushi restaurant with a river running through the middle of it full of live squid and fish you know it is going to be good. You also hope someone else is footing the bill when they bring a freshly cut and still kicking fish and mixed sushi platter served in a dish made of ice. Yum! Yum!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What a worthless news article! How does Obama ate in a sushi restaurant, relate to Michelin gourmet guide removing said sushi restaurant from its publication?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What a worthless news article! How does Obama ate in a sushi restaurant, relate to Michelin gourmet guide removing said sushi restaurant from its publication?

Because its probably the ONLY stock photo on file. The photo really means nothing, unless one is the type that is sucked into the belief that it's gotta be high class, Obama and Abe ate there, and it costs a ton!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Jiro is the place that would rather have 10 customers paying 40,000, than 100 paying 4,000.

And when I go to a nice sushi restaurant, I'd rather pay 40,000 and know there will be only 10 people, than a place with 100.

They obviously could afford a bigger place and to train more expert staff.

Well yeah. But that's entirely missing the point of these restaurants. Just because one can, doesn't mean one should, or that one wants to.

Capitalism is a growth mindset. The goal is to get big, bigger, biggest. It's all about scaling up, producing more, consuming more.

High-end Japanese restaurants are about creating the best experience, through service, atmosphere, and food. It is not a growth mindset. It is an experience mindset. They aren't looking to increase customer numbers, create new branches of the restaurant, start a chain, market it etc etc etc. They're looking to make sure that every person who walks through their doors is comfortable, relaxed, and enjoys themselves for every minute of the experience from the moment they pass in through the doors until the moment they leave.

Sure Jiro could get a bigger place. But that would be counter productive to the goals of the restaurant. it would make it harder to maintain the proper experience. And train more 'expert' staff? The staff at these restaurants are the gold-standard, both in Japan and world-wide. The comment about hiring more 'expert' staff is ludicrous. They ARE the expert staff. This isn't the university kid doing their バイト (baito - part time job) at Sushiro. They are people who will work at the same restaurant for decades, coming in day-in day-out, serving the customers who walk through the door as best they can.

Some have mentioned they have a problem with Jiro making a lot of money, and some have mentioned that going to a high-end restaurants like this is just paying for reputation.

Yeah, that's the point. Building reputation is the point. High-end Japanese restaurants are looking at the experience as an art. Of course they want to build a reputation, they are trying to be artisans in their chosen art. And in Japan, that's something that people are willing to pay for, because they place a high value in the pursuit of excellence, and reputation received as a result. Going to a place with a reputation is part of the experience, particularly when you get there and the experience lives up to the expectation. People are willing to pay more for a place with a reputation, because in Japan that's something people value. And it's why people will take others to such restaurants for business or what not. This is a core facet of Japan, and the Japanese psyche. Anyone who doesn't get that is truly misunderstanding Japan.

High-end Japanese restaurants like Jiro's are a core part of Japanese culture, that make Japan what it is, and I would think would be the reason many of us wanted to come here in the first place. And if you do get this and it bothers you, don't you think you are in the wrong country?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

So restaurants should charge a high price because if you charge 40000 yen, you will still get the volume of customers that you would have if you had charged 4000. Really, really, really, really, really think about that.

In all honesty, yes, it can be done.

Prepare kobe ground beef patty burgers. Rent out a classic space in an expensive area but nothing too obvious. Decorate it well. Have standard procedures in place to impart elegance. Charge 20,000 yen a burger. Craft a great origin story about you and the mysterious master you trained under. Only let 4 people in at a time. Make reservations difficult. Take yourself very seriously. Let word of mouth spread. You will be successful.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Prepare kobe ground beef patty burgers. Rent out a classic space in an expensive area but nothing too obvious. Decorate it well. Have standard procedures in place to impart elegance. Charge 20,000 yen a burger. Craft a great origin story about you and the mysterious master you trained under. Only let 4 people in at a time. Make reservations difficult. Take yourself very seriously. Let word of mouth spread. You will be successful.

Only thing I would argue with this, is instead of Kobe beef, use cheap, low grade ground beef, and pass it off as high quality Kobe beef, and then you will have a winner!

It's not about the food, it's about location and price here!

If I were to open a restaurant here, I put it in the classiest neighbor I could find, spend a ton on making it look great, serve the cheapest imported "whatever" and nobody is going to know the difference!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

A western restaurant enjoying this kind of success would just increase the price until supply and demand meet.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If I were to open a restaurant here, I put it in the classiest neighbor I could find, spend a ton on making it look great, serve the cheapest imported "whatever" and nobody is going to know the difference!

and you would go bankrupt and be out of business within six months. when it comes to restaurants, real estate principles do not apply (location, location, location). quality is what matters in the end.

many of you forget that jiro never wanted to be inlcuded in the guide to begin with. most restaurants clamor for inclusion in the michelin guide, whereas jiro just goes about trying to prepare the best sushi he can. and if he can get 40,000 a pop for it then why not?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I have eaten sushi made by a master who also fed Emperor Hirohito.

I’d eat at Jiro’s.

I’m not a fan of Michelin guides.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That is good for the tourists. As a Japanese who lives and has lived here in Japan for most of my life, there are countless numbers of sushi places that have much greater value than Jiro. If you are going to go through so much money and time to experience Jiro, just fly to Otaru, Hokkaido, where you can eat the freshest and highest quality of fish for a much cheaper price. I just came back from Otaru and had the greatest sushi I've ever had. Don't go to Jiro, it's not worth it. No Japanese locals go there, let that be a lesson.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"It was not true to say the restaurant lost stars but it is not subject to coverage in our guide," 

LOVE the excuses. Look, is it in the list of restaurants with stars anymore? No? Then it lost them, plain and simple. If I'm no longer on a payroll list of employees working at a company for whatever reason, I'm no longer employed there, regardless of what you call it.

But don't cry, people... remember, it's a list of restaurants recommended by a tire company, and a company that basically accepts bribes to be on there, and the guy (Jiro) is a well-known racist anyway who should have been dropped ages ago. Sorry, but anyone can slice up a piece of fish and put it on rice. I could do it, tell you Jiro did it, and some would automatically say it's the best thing they've eaten.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Painfully obvious that most people posting here are a little jealous that they will never have the chance to go to a high class place like this and resort to bad-mouthing it. Whatever makes you feel happy...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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