national

Japanese museums abandoning no-photos policy

16 Comments
By Yuki Takahashi

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2018 GPlusMedia Inc.

16 Comments
Login to comment

Quiet contemplation of art is worth nothing, an Instagram selfie is the reason people go to museums these days.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

museums in Japan have long banned photography due partly to concerns about copyrights and safety.

What does safety have to do with it?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

What does safety have to do with it?

most likely have to do with using accessories like selfie sticks or tripods without taking proper care.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

What does safety have to do with it?

The most popular exhibitions--the ones that draw real crowds--are often so crowded that people jostling for good photo angles, ignorant of those just trying to view the works, can be a real hazard, especially when there are a lot of elderly people in attendance.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Taking a photograph is a fairly benign process, so I'm wondering how any artwork could have been damaged if someone was only taking a photograph. I'm guessing that some people are not following rules such as "no touching" to take a selfie. In those cases, it's not from taking a photo, but rather from not following common sense rules.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It was always silly not to allow photos, especially given the notoriety of Japanese tourists taking photos of EVERYTHING when they go overseas, including some pretty bizarre and shocking stuff in some museums. The arguments that it's "dangerous" or the idea of defending copyright when the museum will post pics of the exhibition pieces online is also just rubbish.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Still, there have been cases in which photographers have damaged artworks.

So out of the millions and millions of worldwide museum visitors, how many photographers have damaged artworks?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

You can find museum and music concert in Japan are being identical in lot of cases, it's pretty copy-paste from one to another. So when they started to review of these rules that's actualy pretty good sign, finally they evaluate it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The problem isn't so much the photo itself but rather the person who takes it. Total deregulation at some of the most popular museums would mean even more congestion and inconsiderate behaviour, for longer periods of time, with more ppl standing directly in front of the artwork trying to find the best angle/light/moment. Dunno if it's what museums, artists and their public really want.

Why not try to cater to all tastes and have, for example, total ban on certain days of the week/w-e (for ppl who want to enjoy artwork 'a certain way') and a more lenient approach on other days?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

For the casual patron, taking a picture of art is only for memory's sake and say you've been there. For a fan of art, taking in the photo with your own eyes is best because you could examine the fine details instead of just snapping a photo and moving a long quickly.

Though I studied art history in high school and began to appreciate art a little more, I am still always on the move and snapping away. I am sure Tokyoites are the same since they live the fast life.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why are humans so stupid and vain? Why can't you just put down the smart phone, camera, or whatever, for thirty minutes of your day, and use your brain and senses instead of being a dog leashed to your smartphone?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I just wish museums weren't so flaming expensive here. It's always a pleasure to visit the museums on London - free and with wonderful exhibits. All they ask is for voluntary donations.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's not the taking pictures that destroy art works, it was, when this rule was made in the last century, the flash. Too much light and too much bright sudden light will weaken or deaden the colors of any painting. This is why the Sistine Chapel’s ceiling had to be cleaned after only 400 years of being exposed to indirect sunlight.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

most likely have to do with using accessories like selfie sticks or tripods without taking proper care.

Those rules were around before these accessories were available (in the case of selfies anyway) Also it would make more sense to ban selfie sticks and tripods as opposed to photography all together.

The most popular exhibitions--the ones that draw real crowds--are often so crowded that people jostling for good photo angles, ignorant of those just trying to view the works, can be a real hazard, especially when there are a lot of elderly people in attendance.

I've never seen that in Japan, or even in the Cairo Museum in Egypt where thousands go every day.  I don't think that has anything to do with it as I've seen photo bans in tiny out-in-the-sticks museums as well.  

It was always silly not to allow photos, especially given the notoriety of Japanese tourists taking photos of EVERYTHING when they go overseas, including some pretty bizarre and shocking stuff in some museums. The arguments that it's "dangerous" or the idea of defending copyright when the museum will post pics of the exhibition pieces online is also just rubbish.

Amen!!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Taking photos of artwork both damages the work as well as steals its soul.  Taking selfies is just dumb, with artwork or otherwise.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Definitely no selfie sticks please! If they're banned in Disneyland then a museum should be a no brainer.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites