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Japan targets ultra-rich travelers to boost regional revival

33 Comments
By Donican Lam

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What is he spending 1million yen on in 4-5 days, that "doesn't feel like a high-value experience"?

To start with, hotel. for four nights can be US$3000 or a bit more. DInner for three can easily be $1000, and we will go to a top sushi and steak restaurant at least 2 nights. Throw in transportation, say, 3-5 taxis a day. Breakfast and lunch. Which can be even less than 5000JPY if he goes to a ramen restaurant. A few more yen for a museum or something that requires an admission fee. Souvenirs. Probably surpasses 1 million yen easily, and if he stays 5 nights it definitely exceeds that amount. Every other visit he will take a flight to Osaka for lunch and to visit Kyoto, and usually comes back the same night.

But all these activities are what one would do traveling in SE Asia, Europe. Japanese prices are just inflated beyond what other countries charge for the same experience.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Don't think the thought of radioactive water swirling around the hull of a docked superyacht will motivate the ultra-rich to show up. For now, Japan is for the cheapskates buying resale watches, bags, and electronics.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I live in Tokyo. I'd like to help the Japanese economy, but I can't find much to spend my money on. Any suggestions?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

THIS IS WHAT TOURISM IS ALL ABOUT!! Tourist spending money in Japan can be considered a transfer of wealth from the tourists through currency exchange where tourists convert their money into Japanese yen to cover their expenses while in Japan. In exchange Japan wins to because the process involves fees sometimes unfavorable exchange rates, that could result in a financial benefit for Japan’s currency exchange services and the local businesses. When tourists their spend money on various goods and services during their stay in Japan the spending goes directly to local businesses, which helps the local economy benefiting Japanese companies and workers. The tax revenue such as consumption tax and sales tax, are placed on many products and services in Japan. So, when tourists make purchases, a portion of the money the tourist spend goes to the Japanese government in the form of taxes, which contributes to public revenue. In turn creates jobs in the tourism industry in Japan which provides employment opportunities for the locals. Another point when tourists visit and spend their money, it supports jobs in areas like hospitality, transportation, and tourism-related services the money generated from tourism can be reinvested into improving Japan’s infrastructure and services for tourists. This is why Japan is so big on bringing in tourist into the country they want to create a positive feedback loop which attracts even more visitors. If you notice they often promote Japanese products, and the tourists buy these Japanese products as souvenirs or gifts. The promotion of these Japanese exports contributes to the success of Japanese businesses in the global market. In a sense tourist spending benefits Japan’s economy, but it can also impact their economy as we saw with the Covid crisis which crashed the level of tourism, which impacted government policies, and the local economy because they benefit from the influx of tourist spending.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

the metropolitan government said it has dispatched staff to study and learn from harbor facilities in the Mediterranean

Well, there you go.

Metropolitan government staffers get to go visit the Mediterranean on “work” business.

Socialism for the central planners, paid for with our money.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If you're staying in your yacht, having an Amex centurion in your pocket doesnt make it physically possible to spend ¥1.500.000 per day in a medium sized/small japanese town, not even in Tokyo for that matter, unless you're into one of those ludicrous "girl's bars"

Lol!! Had thought they were talking about those cruise ships with hundreds/thousands of people on them. But yeah.... ;)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

These are not serious policy proposals and should be dismissed as such.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

They might have some success in attracting a few ultra-wealthy tourists here, but I have my doubts that will be enough to make a big difference in an economy the size of Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Only 10-15 grand? Hardly rich people if that is the case. And why in dollars?

If you're staying in your yatch, having an Amex centurion in your pocket doesnt make it physically possible to spend ¥1.500.000 per day in a medium sized/small japanese town, not even in Tokyo for that matter, unless you're into one of those ludicrous "girl's bars"

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Only 10-15 grand? Hardly rich people if that is the case. And why in dollars?

Probably more depends on the size of yacht. But that sort of money being spent per day locally in a small rural area for a week is not bad.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I guess, being very rich and wealthy is mostly correlated to age. I think, they won't come here to eat urchin, but prefer to et the urchin flight in to their yachts, mansions or resorts anywhere else where they reside in higher age..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

From the article:

"It is said that when a ship stays for a day, it contributes between $10,000 to $15,000 to the country's economy.

Only 10-15 grand? Hardly rich people if that is the case. And why in dollars?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

YouTubers and annoying tourists have become a menace I can see why the government is looking further up market instead of relying on weebs.

Ironically, some of the ultra-rich will probably be YouTubers.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

YouTubers and annoying tourists have become a menace I can see why the government is looking further up market instead of relying on weebs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My father is a physician and spends that amount on airfare to Japan, and probably the same amount in 4-5 days here

What is he spending 1million yen on in 4-5 days, that "doesn't feel like a high-value experience"?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

The Japan National Tourism Organization defines "high-value travelers" as those who spend a total of 1 million yen ($7,000) or more per visit to Japan.

My father is a physician and spends that amount on airfare to Japan, and probably the same amount in 4-5 days here, but doesn't feel like a high-value experience.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

These comments are an eye opener regarding the JT reader demographics.

But again, the minimum wage earner surely cannot understand the world of the rich.

You actually don't need to be "ultra rich" to have your small boat docked at the cheap Flower park marina in Yashio Saitama and go explore small cities in the east coast with your family every now and then.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The buses and trains are great in Japan. I just have to remember to scan my IC card when getting on the bus. A few times I forgot because some buses are flat rate (only have to scan IC card when you get off) and I am getting scolded by the bus drivers.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is ridiculous. The people who own the super yachts have chefs onboard and superior food to anything they'd get a a pitiful Japanese port town. The only money they really spend is docking fees, etc. and perhaps a night out drinking and carousing. There is literally nothing Japan has to offer these people that they don't already have.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Oh goodie, I can now sail to Japan on my super, huge, big, colossal, super yacht, with its 3 super helicopters. I did think of going to the Bahama's or Nice, or even Singapore, but i thought that sitting through typhoons, blizzards, freezing weather....etc....would be far more challenging.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Those wanting to skip the Tokyo traffic and get to Mt Fuji in 30 minutes, for example, could open the app and book a private helicopter from Tokyo to Kawaguchiko. The app takes care of all the arrangements, including transfer from the customer's current location to the heliport.

Unforgettable experience indeed.

Wish I could do it again but with my own money so I can bring my family with me.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

They go to places like Dubai, Monaco and Monte Carlo

Monaco and Monte Carlo are the same place, mate.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It won't bring in much in the way of local benefits. Mass tourism, even if you hate it, reliably delivers cash directly into local economies in shops, cafes, at tourist sites, in hotels, guesthouses and AirBnBs and through transport - taxis, trains, buses.

Rich people don't spend money like that. They don't shop like that or travel like that. They want to avoid ordinary people. They go to places like Dubai, Monaco and Monte Carlo for that reason. And their service expectations are insane.

You might like the idea of having all the tourist revenue from just a handful of wealthy tourists, but it just won't work.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Why would the rich be interested in this stupid idea. They already own Carribbean Islands they haven't explored yet.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

They’d better bring wads of yen otherwise they’ll be paying 10% more for that helicopter ride with their foreign credit cards.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Finally, an idea and service I will have no use for.

Poor me...

Nissan Tiida for transport and shopping later when the discount stickers come out.

Works for me and wife.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Instead how about Japan focus on reducing the food costs from the greedy food giants

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Do they really believe this stupid idea?

11 ( +13 / -2 )

From on-demand helicopters to private superyachts, the spending power of ultra-rich travelers could be the key to revitalizing regional areas in Japan to give the country a much-needed boost in its post-pandemic economic recovery.

Hope they'll check for typhoon forecast or local store that have sign "Japanese only"

-14 ( +4 / -18 )

How does taking a helicopter from central Tokyo to Mt. Fuji help a local economy? All it does it pollute the air and probably make it more difficult for the average guy to see Fuji-san. This is just another way of making look like Japan is trying to help its dying regional areas, but I don't think the Ultrarich are interested in those areas.

13 ( +17 / -4 )

… accounted for only 1 percent of total inbound visitors

I would prefer our taxes not being spent to enhance the lives of the top 1% of foreign tourists.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

Super yachts also offer a way of increasing spending in more rural areas that may lack forms of accommodation such as luxury hotels and other infrastructure for tourists, supporting the government's goal of increasing the number of high-end travelers in places off the beaten path.

You can smell the socialism for the rich, LDP money transfers to local crony interests from here.

Another chapter in 'New Capitalism '. More accurately described as neo-feudalism.

-6 ( +12 / -18 )

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