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Local authorities provide help to people worried about dying alone

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Really sad the government is literally checking to see if they have died yet, they could do so much more for these people to make their final years more enjoyable.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Call me old-fashioned but the elderly (no matter which country or culture they come from) should be taken in or at least live close to their families, nobody should live out their last days alone. Coming from an Asian heritage, things like these are rare since families take care of their own but considering Japan's aging population, I guess it can't be helped.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@ Toshihiro,

Maybe read it again. "The man lives in a nursing home and has no next of kin who he can task with tending to his posthumous arrangements." Also japan is changing we recently had this issue come up with my Japanese wifes parents they wanted/expected us to move back to there home town which is in the middle of no where and even the schools have closed down. with our young child, this is not going to happen as we must think of our kids future, we visit often and we suggested they move closer to us but it fell on deaf ears as my wife is the eldest daughter she is expect to... blar blar blar, no logic just rule following as ever. - Nope not with my kids future.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

When people pass away, the govt gets 50% in death duty, so keeping tabs on these people will make money easier to get.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

no logic just rule following as ever. - Nope not with my kids future.

Exactly. The only way to break the cycle of blindly following tradition is to refuse to participate and protect your offspring from it. Expose them to the multitude of positive points about Japan and equip them to understand the negative points.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm not worried about dying alone. I'm worried about living.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

When people pass away, the govt gets 50% in death duty, so keeping tabs on these people will make money easier to get.

To be liable for 50% death duties, you need an inheritance in excess of ¥600 million. How many of these dire souls being cremated with public money have that kind of money stashed away?

Note that the article says the city government is *targeting people with no relatives or insufficient money to take care of arrangements like funerals and cremations*.

Note too that death duties are calculated on the individual inheritance, not on the estate as a whole. So even if you leave that ¥600 million when you go, the more family members you spread it over, the less each will pay in tax.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

He is in his late 60's and lives in a nursing home?

Isn't that a bit young to be giving up and moving in with people like your parent's ages?

This guy needs to get out and do some surfing, hiking, living. It ain't over yet. Late 60's is young.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

the more family members you spread it over, the less each will pay in tax...

the story is about old people with no family.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@gogogo - Really sad the government is literally checking to see if they have died yet

I know a guy whose job is exactly that. He is employed by the local city hall and he drives around the countryside knocking on doors of pension recipients to make sure they are alive. He's found a few dead ones and also found a few who died several years ago, but their spouse or family were still collecting their pension. However, this case is very different. The structure of Japanese families is very 'loose' (for want of a better expression) and it's not uncommon for families to drift apart and become estranged. This leaves many elderly with nobody to help them or settle their affairs. It's so saddening that after such a long life, these people are all alone and only have the local city hall to settle their affairs upon their death.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

He is in his late 60's and lives in a nursing home?

Isn't that a bit young to be giving up and moving in with people like your parent's ages?

This guy needs to get out and do some surfing, hiking, living. It ain't over yet. Late 60's is young.

You are assuming he is in good health. Not everyone at that age is.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

One day we will see Robotic helpers for the Eldery, being lonely towards death will be a thing of the past.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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