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Local governments supporting elderly by promoting cashless payment systems

12 Comments
By Shun Yoshioka

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To encourage elderly people to take part in the uptake programs, the city holds seminars teaching them how to operate smartphones. Similarly, the Hanamaki city office provides assistance to people at mobile shops, while many other local governments have set up consultation services within their buildings.

Your tax yen at work. Seems the mobile providers should be doing this as part of the promotion of the business, not relying on the state and taxes to help out asset- rich seniors many of whom are sitting on hoards of cash.

But I suppose that is the whole point of this LDP/Japan Inc. synergy.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

In a survey of some 1,600 respondents conducted by the Cabinet Office in July and August 2023, roughly half of those aged 70 and older said that they either "hardly use" digital devices such as smartphones or "never use them."

Many of those elder already may have degenerative cognitive function, cashless payment supposed to make things faster for anyone who posses good cognitive function. However for people who have degenerative cognitive function, result can be opposite. Don't forget many apps need to update and in every update they might change interface layout, try those change to elder.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Why? If the so-called elderly want to use cash, what’s the problem? Oh, wait, cash for the app makers. I see. Never mind.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Many people find using apps a faster and easier way of spending too much money.

Being thrifty with better control of spending only what you got isn't something that needs to be weeded out, especially by the govt.

For those seniors who want to learn how to use QR codes and electronic money etc. give them opportunities by setting up classes or send tutors who can teach and assist them on how to.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Is is any wonder when there is a huge element of distrust towards digital money, from the numerous data leaks, scams, banking crashes, phone outages, etc.. Don't forget the 'My Number failure.

As @speed has pointed out, these apps are a great way of making you spend more, and lose control of your finances. This is a marketing campaign for PayPay, as aggressive player in the digital money arena.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Digital payments are more likely to exclude the elderly. Some people simply cannot cope with the tech, no matter how much funding and enforced education you throw at them.

This sort of change is generational at best. You can't speed it up to save money. Accept that you need to retain cash and move on to deal with other issues.

A recent phone in to my local TV programme had blanket support for retaining cash. When the power goes off, there is a quake or your tech falls over, cash still works. The tangibility of cash helps kids learn about the value of money, and cash works well for tourists.

The best non-cash payment service in Japan was the humble Suica card. Have they managed to restart issuing those yet? They were easy enough for most people to use. No app required.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Many of those elder already may have degenerative cognitive function, cashless payment supposed to make things faster for anyone who posses good cognitive function. However for people who have degenerative cognitive function, result can be opposite. Don't forget many apps need to update and in every update they might change interface layout, try those change to elder.

As usual , I guess someone did not read the article before he posted.

To encourage elderly people to take part in the uptake programs, the city holds seminars teaching them how to operate smartphones. Similarly, the Hanamaki city office provides assistance to people at mobile shops, while many other local governments have set up consultation services within their buildings.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Your tax yen at work

That's right, helping Japan's old people.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

As usual , I guess someone did not read the article before he posted.

Looks like someone did not read the comment before he/she posted. Many elderly may not have a smartphone to begin with. Many of those who do likely cannot operate a smart phone very well nor go to the city hall or various shops for training due to a number of factors, one of which is degenerative cognitive function.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

My UK bank issues cashless payment as standard on my bank card. No need for third party apps. Why can't Japanese banks do the same, it'd be much simpler for everyone.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

We use AU pay which gives us extra points. It is very easy to use.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nothing's free, Govt. wants your valuable data, anyone who believes in Govt honesty, please think twice.

Massive Govt Deficits = More ZERO-SUM Yen Games!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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