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Rwandan single mothers turn to online babysitting of Japanese kids

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Hope she is paying them enough money and not just making a huge profit for herself.

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

@Abbey https://www.minimum-wage.org/international/rwanda

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Probably the worst way to babysit.

I will NEVER ever trust 3rd party babysitting via internet.

Physical persense is imperative. Even if I work 2 jobs, I would let my spouse babysit till child is 5 years old.

I want my children to have my philosophy and my family style and not those of institutionalized pre-schools with teachers I don't even know their character till too late. I cannot trust people whom we do not know their life style or their philosophy and I now they do not know mine till I meet with them. I even have hard time with personal baby sitters that are licensed they say, and by whom for what.

I also know that parents must be there for any physical emergencies and internet just does NOT cut it.

So there... to all those internet schooling buffs.

As for that company making money... nice thought but ... not for me...

4 ( +10 / -6 )

I agree with @kazetsukai never trust 3rd party babysitting especially via internet.

I actually don't want to teach my kid to spend all his time in front of computer. I want it to have interaction with other people and to learn how to be a part of society.

Plus as kazetsukai said before you don't know what kind of babysitters/teachers are there. I had a bad experience here in Japan with so called foreign "English Teachers" as half of them turns out to be from somewhere else than English speaking country. Moreover most of them don't have any teaching background to do the job.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

I want my children to have my philosophy and my family style and not those of institutionalized pre-schools with teachers I don't even know their character till too late.

Your child will inevitably experience a variety of teaching styles and encounter all sorts of characters in their childhood. As long as my child is safe, I'm happy to have them interact with people that might not share the same philosophy as me. The last thing I want is to have my child taught by a robot with no personality. I feel its important not to indoctrinate our children with what WE want, but let our children decide for themselves what to believe from a variety of experiences. The problem with Japanese education and society is that they lack exposure to the outside world.

Not a big fan of having my child sit in front of a computer all day. They need fresh air and sunshine. They need to play with sticks and dig in the dirt, play with bugs. Its good for the immune system.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Rwanda, under its current stable administration, is a success story in Africa. The country seems well run and functioning.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

..Japan via the videoconferencing app Zoom...

Can't they use any other app other than something that allows the CCP to monitor you & in this case, monitor your children?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I suppose sitting in front of a computer for an hour a day is a terrible experience for a child. Especially when they are forced to sing in a foreign language or Japanese. And watch a woman not Japanese cook, shop, and slice unfamiliar vegetables. Imagine the horror of the child to discover people who don't resemble Japanese exist! Yes, best to isolate them in a cocoon of this society so they never develop empathy for other cultures; other peoples; learn of the world. Also, who knows what nefarious actions these online predators - all employees of that Osakan restaurant owner - will inflict on the poor child. While their mother or father watches!

5 ( +6 / -1 )

@ Borscht

I tip my hat to you.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

They don't say how much they charge their clients...

Otherwise, I have no trouble having kids babysitted on line. Far better than to let them watch TV only.

As a parent though, you need to control a little what's happening. Everyday routine.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It’s not actually “babysitting,” it’s interacting with someone over the Internet while the parent is in the home. My kids would love something like this. They enjoy meeting people from other countries and they’ve embraced talking to far away family and friends over the Internet since we aren’t able to visit them now. I’d love to give them opportunities like this to see more of the world.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Better than leaving them watching trash on TV like Crayon Shinchan, I reckon.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Where is tax paid?

children can watch in the back of the car while mothers can drink all night because of the time difference.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

children can watch in the back of the car while mothers can drink all night because of the time difference.

I don't think those type of mothers will bother with this type of services.

They'll just leave them

watching trash on TV like Crayon Shinchan,

=)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

 I even have hard time with personal baby sitters

Sounds like this service would be better for you then.

The kids will be interacting with the sitter and other kids online, not in person where the sitters could physically harm your kids.

And if you don't like what the sitters are doing you can just unplug the pc

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Glad to hear about this nice initiative of international relationship between Rwandan women and Japanese children. For sure a good example of open minded, open hearted people. Children educated as world citizens. Congratulations

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This sounds fine to me, but its not "babysitting" and should not be promoted as such.

We all know how eager some people are to leave their kids unattended and it should not be encouraged. A babysitter is someone in the same room, not down a communication line.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The African country underwent a genocide during the Rwandan Civil War from 1990 to 1994 when extremists from the majority Hutu tribe massacred members of the Tutsi minority. Approximately 800,000 people are estimated to have been killed within 100 days in 1994.

In 2006, a French judge opened an investigation into the 1994 plane crash that killed President Juvenal Habyarimana of Rwanda, a member of the majority Hutu ethnic group. The crash is widely seen as the spark that ignited the genocide, making responsibility for the crash one of the most politically volatile questions in Rwanda.

According to diplomatic cables, French officials at the time blamed the Tutsi rebel army led by Paul Kagame, Rwanda’s president. Mr. Kagame’s government has long maintained that the plane was shot down by Hutu military actors.

The Rwandans responded to the investigation by severing diplomatic ties with France and initiating their own inquiry into the French role in the genocide. The two countries did not restore diplomatic relations until 2009.

The Cunningham-Levy-Muse-Report, 11.12.2017, commissioned by the Rwandan government and conducted by a Washington law firm, alleges that French military forces trained their Rwandan counterparts, supplied them with weapons even after an arms embargo, and gave cover, under the auspices of a United Nations-sanctioned humanitarian mission, in the last moments of a genocidal campaign.

Researchers and the Rwandan government say they cannot get France to make good on earlier commitments to fully open its archives or otherwise investigate the country’s role.

Archival documents show that the French government was a close ally of the Rwandan regime that planned and perpetrated the mass slaughter of an estimated 800,000 people, most of them members of the Tutsi ethnic minority. Historians say a son of François Mitterrand, the French president at the time, was also a close friend of the Rwandan leader whose government organized the genocide.

Today France does NOT accept any responsibility in relation to the Rwandan Genocide. The France gov uses its political & economic position in the UN and EU, and continues its hegemony over its former African colonies.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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