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Fierce heatwave hampers flood recovery efforts

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The guy's wearing two layers of clothing, including long sleeves and long trousers. A better hat would be made from a lighter material and have a brim. I'm noticing from all the photos this is the way nearly everyone is dressed there -- all bundled up.

When I've done manual labor during the height of summer, me and the crew always wore shorts and a t-shirt, often just a vest, and a floppy hat. But that wasn't Japan, where my fellow train commuters often wear 3 layers of clothing during heat waves.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

I am being serious. Can someone explain the long sleeve (and often long pants) spandex, often black or dark dark blue. I see all the time in Japan. Is there really a scientific logical reason for wearing this stuff in blistering heat and sun or is this some myth, some grandma's tale, that is simply perpetuated in Japanese culture?

8 ( +9 / -1 )

tens of thousands of rescue workers 

Sincere thanks to each volunteer. Sincere thanks to each emergency services worker. Sincere thanks to each SDF member, fully kitted out and wearing helmets in this heat.

I hope all are getting whatever help they individually need to accomplish their missions.

Out of curiosity, where are the Japanese clothing entrepreneurs? Hotter and wetter weather aren't going away.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Well I’ll attempt to explain...

In Japan I have often heard to cover up from the sun due to the heat. Now, I will admit that when I heard this, it was addressed toward females. However when doing construction or I’d imagine, disaster relief work, you don’t always want to be in shorts or short sleeves because of the things that can cut you or get onto your skin. Same reason sometimes you don’t wanna wear shorts in the forest in the summer.

Covering up when under the sun is a good idea, but Id say more like the arabs do, with reflective long airy tunics so you don’t get sunburned. The police in the photos look like the hardest part of their day was wearing all that gear!

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Can someone explain the long sleeve (and often long pants) spandex, often black or dark dark blue. I see all the time in Japan

Another possible reason is that its considered unsightly for men over 25 to show their legs (i.e. wearing shorts). I saw an article in one of those trashy womens magazines full of quotes from Japanese girls saying "eww i dont want to see his hairy shins or knees". Also a topic on 2ch (hardly a good source for credible opinions, but still), making fun of adults who wear shorts saying its time they grow up and wear long pants.

So, i think that there are a few people who are too hot to wear full pants, but dont want to show their legs.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I think these clothes are for protection from sharp objects and such. I don't think working there in a tshirt and flip flops is a smart idea with all the garbage and dangerous objects there.

35 degrees and 70% humidity. Nothing but respect for the volunteers and rescue people there. They'd have to carry me out after 10 minutes.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Long sleeves and long pants are recommended when doing flood/mudslide cleanup.

Here’s a US reference, notice the poster.

https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/cleanup/facts.html

I’m not sure if they are available overseas but here in Japan it’s a good idea to wear the work clothes designed for construction workers etc that have fans built in.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

stepoutsidethebox - I'd love an explanation for the dark colours too - yesterday in Tokyo I saw so many people wearing black on a 35 degree day. Is it just ignorance, is there something counterintuitive that I don't know about, or are the laws of physics different in Japan?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I've seen military personnel (in other countries in Southeast Asia) wearing athletic uniform while wearing combat boots performing rescue work without much trouble. Being Asian, I kinda understand that you're more inclined to cover up during the heat while other cultures tend to dress down. But if you're experiencing heat stress under all that, you should probably dress down than becoming somebody that needs to be rescued.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@cucab wearing black

Black hides sweat better.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

no cucas, white is better in the sun. Something sweat wicking. Something that protects the neck and head from sun. But cut and abrasion protection are mandatory. Sturdy boots, 20cm tall. Working in this kind of heat is misery. I hate being in substations in summer heat. But that's what's necessary.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Papi & Educator are right.

Protection is the key. In fact ALL volunteer and organized workers MUST wear full protective gear, including work boots as instructed by disaster officials. I guess individuals in their own homes dress at their discretion.

Broken glass, Sharp metal fragments, Splintery wood, Unknown Toxic / poisonous materials, Airborne / Waterborne bacteria and any number of other dangerous elements contaminate the sites.

These people are working in Serious Hazard Zones.

They're not landscape gardening or building outdoor bbqs.

In fact one must acknowledge their commitment in extreme conditions.

Pretty Amazing.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I wonder if cloud seeding at controlled levels might help? At least they might be able to bring some light rain as a relief from the heat?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Saturday was the second hottest July day on record in my town. Even with the prolonged rain, the average temperature so far in July is about 2.5C above average.

I know there is a lot of work to be done, but I hope people can scale back their efforts to what can be managed in this heat.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Educator60

Long sleeves and long pants are recommended when doing flood/mudslide cleanup.

Your link doesn't say anything of the nature. The poster is for cases for people who enter buildings with dangerous levels of mold.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The guy's wearing two layers of clothing, including long sleeves and long trousers. A better hat would be made from a lighter material and have a brim. I'm noticing from all the photos this is the way nearly everyone is dressed there -- all bundled up.

It's a requirement for doing this volunteer work, when moving mud, debris etc.

Officials will not allow anyone to do cleanup if they're not properly covered, in order to avoid heatstroke, severe sunburn and contamination from debris affected by sewage.

We (me n the gf) volunteered yesterday in Kumage area of Yamaguchi. I was not allowed on site because I had a t-shirt on with work pants and boots. The gf was fully covered. Hence I ended up serving refreshments in the tent.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@belrick Hence I ended up serving refreshments in the tent.

Thank you both for volunteering.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Jeff Lee, “Your link doesn't say anything of the nature. The poster is for cases for people who enter buildings with dangerous levels of mold.”

If you think there is no danger of mold after a flood or mudslide, well, good luck. As the page began:

“Take steps to protect yourself and your loved ones during your cleanup after a hurricane, flood, or other natural disaster.”

And as Belrick pointed out, he was not allowed on site.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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