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Fish in tsunami debris boat quarantined in U.S.

10 Comments
By GOSIA WOZNIACKA

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10 Comments
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I wish they would answer the question how these fish can survive for years in confined spaces.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

the rest of those fish were euthanized to minimize the risk of introducing invasive species to Washington

I have some doubts about this supposed threat of invasive species that gets mentioned nearly every time debris from Japan's tsunami washes up on the North American west coast.

Stuff from Japan, and even people, have been washing up on those shores for thousands of years thanks to the direction of the ocean current.

One example, in 1834 three fishermen from Japan (Iwakichi, Kyukichi and Otokichi) washed up on a beach at the northwest corner of Washington state. They were taken to Fort Vancouver where they met Ranald MacDonald (no relation to the Golden Arches), the son of a Scottish father based in Fort Astoria and a Chinook Indian mother. Ranald then became obsessed with the idea of visiting Japan, and long story short, he ended up in Japan in 1848 (before Perry) and ended up teaching English to around 14 samurai. He is credited as being the first American English teacher in Japan.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@Sensato

Interesting "story" ! Se non è vero è ben trovato !

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I wish they would answer the question how these fish can survive for years in confined spaces.

I would like to know that as well

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Se non è vero è ben trovato

@Fighting

It's true, and fairly well documented.

You can do a Google search of "Ranald Macdonald" (in quotes, be careful of the spelling) and "Otokichi" for more information from Wikipedia and other sources.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He is credited as being the first American English teacher in Japan.

(tongue in cheek...) So this is the that JET's in Japan have to thank.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What did the fish eat for 4 years? It is not like they could leave the boat, go hunting and come back.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@ Sensato - It's very possible. Read up on invasive lion fish in the Atlantic, or the "flying carp" in the U.S.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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