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Law change puts traditional Japanese daikon farmers in a pickle

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Ichiro Takahashi, 81, who has been in the business for two decades, decided to call it a day when the revised law was passed five years ago.

J Govt just keep another strain to Japanese farmer that already facing many difficulty with current labor shortage and production price that keep increasing. J Govt also put a new law few years back that make another challenges for those farmers.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2018/03/20/commentary/japan-commentary/abolition-main-crop-seeds-law-puts-nation-risk/

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Another "solution" to a problem that doesn't exist.

9 ( +17 / -8 )

Farmers of traditional smoked daikon pickles,

I REALLY want to meet a farmer who plants and produces "smoked daikon pickles". Maybe he can give me some tips on smoking bacon!

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

YubaruToday  08:05 am JST

Farmers of traditional smoked daikon pickles,

I REALLY want to meet a farmer who plants and produces "smoked daikon pickles". Maybe he can give me some tips on smoking baconYubaruToday  08:05 am JST

https://hotsmoked.co.uk/recipe/home-cured-smoked-bacon/

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Iburigakko is tasty.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Leave good enough alone.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

@englisc aspyrgend I was being totally sarcastic!

But I still want to meet a farmer than can plant and raise, smoked daikon pickles!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It is a good law designed to ensure the safety of the food we eat. The farmers will have to meet the new standard.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Hygiene standards should be enforced but individual aging producers need to be supported too. The only way i can think of is forming corporate under the government support and run the farms as collaboratively like a one company. Corporate should be nonprofit and all profit must be given to producers according to the size of their farm.

i hope farmers aren’t left alone. Japan should protect its agriculture and farming with practical support.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Eat iburigakko together with slices of sharp cheddar.

thank me later.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

puts traditional Japanese daikon farmers in a pickle

I see what you did there

0 ( +0 / -0 )

i hope farmers aren’t left alone. Japan should protect its agriculture and farming with practical support.

Just how much MORE protection do you expect the government to provide to it's farmers? Have you ever stopped to think about why we pay so much more for vegetables and rice and fruit?

Rather obvious you are probably unaware from your comment here.

Oh and I would love to hear your ideas about just what is "practical support?"

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Guys, don't put emotion of practical safety. People have died because of a lack of sanitary measures when preparing such foods. The whole, "B-b-b-b-but we've been doing this for ages since when food was scarce in the area in winter!" It's not scarce in winter anymore, and now people are dying from the practice, so clean things up. Before this law, they could practically wash things in toilet water and not get in trouble for it. Putting in separate sinks and washing stations is CRITICAL to sanitation and safety.

It's sad that some of these elderly farmers with no heirs will close their doors a year or two earlier than planned as a result, but in those cases this law doesn't seem to be the real issue.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

over practical safety, not of, sorry

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The Food Sanitation Law was amended in 2018 in response to an E. coli outbreak in 2012 in which eight people died after consuming pickled cabbage in Hokkaido due to a problem in the manufacturing process.

But was it in one of the large-scale factories or a small traditional local producer? It would be ironic if a tragedy caused by a big company ends up shutting down all its small scale competitors.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

RonJB,

I just did a bit of hunting around for the 2012 E.Coli outbreak:

“Seven people, most of them elderly women, have died after eating pickles contaminated with E.coli in northern Japan in the country's deadliest mass food poisoning in 10 years.

A total of 103 others have been made ill after eating the same lightly pickled Chinese cabbage produced in late July by a company in the city of Sapporo, according to health bulletins issued by the local government on Sunday.”

The company concerned seems to have covered its tracks really well. I can't find a name anywhere, just "a company in the city of Sapporo." However, it rather looks like it was a big company.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

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