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Fukui nuclear unit halted after missing deadline on antiterror measures

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The power companies can no longer cut the corners on safety.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Crisis management is not Japan's forte. Just look at Fukushima, covid, oil spill, etc. These all require thinking out of the box which Japan seriously lacks.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Exactly what sort of anti-terrorism measures are nuclear reactors supposed to take? Let the Self Defense Force troops guard the Fukui reactor.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

Japan's contingency planning is lacking.

Perhaps they should think more carefully before they do something.

I have the suspicion there's more hidden details to the closure of the facility because its unsafe and fragile and not really because of terrorism.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

The anti-terrorism measures in the NRA regulations are available on their site.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Nothing is stopped or halted at such a nuclear plant, only the usage of the resulting electricity is interrupted for any show purposes. Does really anyone here think that all of the radiation stops completely if some people order it? You surely know it better from those other famous places , having ‘stopped’ operation by force of accident or typhoon. A mess, still after decades… In fact it’s just only stupid and wasting behavior, not to use all that energy from working nuclear power plants. Like if it would rain money from the clouds and you would instead prefer running away into a more sunnier area because someone tells you all clouds are a sign of bad weather. lol

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

The ones on the Japan Sea coast are thought to be particularly vulnerable to attack by a theoretical enemy.

Kashiwazaki-Kariwa in Niigata has also fallen short of these regulations.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Regulators gave the green light to the aging No. 3 unit after screening the utility's safety measures.

and

A nuclear reactor in central Japan's Fukui Prefecture was halted ... after its restart as it could not meet a deadline set by regulators to implement antiterrorism measures.

So the regulators allowed it to start, without the required safety measures, based upon a promise that they would fix it?

No wonder people do not trust nuclear power, and even more the people in charge of it.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

KEPCO was given permission to restart the reactor by the NRA provide the company finished its anti-terrorism measures at the plant by a certain date, which they failed to do. The reactor met the NRA safety measures but the plant failed on the anti-terrorism.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Suspension of a nuclear reactor means it is still hot and operating but not generating electricity. If the control rods are lowered and the nuclear reaction stopped, the company will be required to refuel before operating the reactor again. Expensive, and takes about six months. I think the fuel replacement cycle is every two years.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

@zichi

So, if the control rods are not in, the reactor is still very vulnerable to a terrorist attack isn't it. For example, terrorists could wipe out the cooling system and it is Fukushima v. 2.0.

If it is vulnerable to a terrorist attack it should be shut down completely.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

A nuclear reactor in central Japan's Fukui Prefecture was halted on Saturday, just four months after its restart as it could not meet a deadline set by regulators to implement antiterrorism measures.

I don't know where to start.

World-wide anti-terrorism measures were cranked up after 9/11 (in 2001).

In January 2013 (twelve years later!), the NRA drafts a "Draft New Safety Standards for Nuclear Power Stations"

https://www.nsr.go.jp/data/000067120.pdf

An in October 2021 (8 years after the NRA drafted their Safety Standards covering for anti-terrorism measures and twenty years after 9/11), do NPP operators still not comply with anti-terrorism measures or concept.

In Europe the law features the concept of "criminal negligence" . Something tells me that the Japanese law does not have anything remotely similar...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

happyhere

@zichi

So, if the control rods are not in, the reactor is still very vulnerable to a terrorist attack isn't it. For example, terrorists could wipe out the cooling system and it is Fukushima v. 2.0.

If it is vulnerable to a terrorist attack it should be shut down completely.

While a reactor contains nuclear fuel rods, with or without the control rods generate heat and need constant cooling. The chances of a terrorist attack against a nuclear plant are small. They have armed guards. But nothing is 100% safe.

Shut down would mean emptying the reactor of the fuel rods which can not be done immediately and takes about six months to move them to the spent fuel pool. In theory, a terrorist could bomb the pool? Where to stop?

They could use a drone attack.

blue

World-wide anti-terrorism measures were cranked up after 9/11 (in 2001). 

In January 2013 (twelve years later!), the NRA drafts a "Draft New Safety Standards for Nuclear Power Stations"

https://www.nsr.go.jp/data/000067120.pdf

The NRA did not exist until about 2013.

An in October 2021 (8 years after the NRA drafted their Safety Standards covering for anti-terrorism measures and twenty years after 9/11), do NPP operators still not comply with anti-terrorism measures or concept.

In Europe the law features the concept of "criminal negligence" . Something tells me that the Japanese law does not have anything remotely similar...

The defense of European and American nuclear plants is no better protected than the Japanese ones. They don't have anti-aircraft missiles, preventing an accident or attack from a plane.

I think earthquakes are a greater danger than a terrorist attacks.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Zichi

The NRA did not exist until about 2013.

Then I guess the NRA got set up by the DPJ after Fukushima.

Still, some agency had to act as a watchdog before that (wasn't it METI until then?) and that agency sat on their hands for a decade. Not mentioning that they also sat on their hands (a major conflict of interest of acting as the " Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry" being the most likely reason for that) for decades as far as environmental threats were concerned.

I also agree that natural disasters are much more likely around here than anything, still there is a regulation in place and it has been blatantly ignored by the nuclear lobby as so many times before that.

Since I moved to Japan back in 2004, I learned that the 安全第一 (Anzen Dai-Ichi or "Safety First") mantra is to be taken with a one-ton block of salt around here.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

blue

@Zichi

The NRA did not exist until about 2013.

Then I guess the NRA got set up by the DPJ after Fukushima.

Still, some agency had to act as a watchdog before that (wasn't it METI until then?) and that agency sat on their hands for a decade. Not mentioning that they also sat on their hands (a major conflict of interest of acting as the " Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry" being the most likely reason for that) for decades as far as environmental threats were concerned. 

I also agree that natural disasters are much more likely around here than anything, still there is a regulation in place and it has been blatantly ignored by the nuclear lobby as so many times before that.

Since I moved to Japan back in 2004, I learned that the 安全第一 (Anzen Dai-Ichi or "Safety First") mantra is to be taken with a one-ton block of salt around here.

Prior to the NRA, there were several atomic agencies.

One of the greatest reasons for the nuclear disaster. All of those involved with the "nuclear village", the power companies, the atomic agencies, scientists, nuclear engineers, all believed that a nuclear meltdown would never be possible. It could have all been easily avoided, and at much fewer costs than the disaster is costing.

Do not forget the role and responsibility of the IAEA. They too gave the nod to everything.

https://www.nsr.go.jp/data/000148261.pdf

The Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

https://www.jaea.go.jp/english/about/history.html

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The power companies can no longer cut the corners on safety.

c'mon it never stopped them before

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Japan cut corners? Never.

They will just round them off a little.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Who are these people plotting to attack nuclear plants in Japan?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Peter, to spell out what I already said above, DPRK ‘spetsnaz’ commando units are trained to come ashore and do exactly this.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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