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Fukushima residents seek immigration to South Korea

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Interesting. I hope they get the resident permits.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

They want to live somewhere without fears of radiation, good for them. Only thing is, Koreans DO NOT like Japanese for the most part. This will be interesting.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

What a shocker!! All of this time, many Japanese people have complained about Korea, and now they want to go to Korea to live. I guess Korea is starting to look like a way better place than Japan. Japan is not only losing its tourist, but also its citizens too. What a sad predicament that Japan is in!!

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

"Japantown" is "ilbon ma-eul" in Korean. I hope it won't become a slum.

Mikemcfly87, official government policy does not equal people's opinion. It is not so in Japan, China, U.S, Taiwan, South Korea, North Korea nor any European country. Establishing a community to a foreign country like so many European countries have done in Europe is the best way to show that we are all just people. I think they would be welcomed in Korea. Eventually (Japanese are not renown for their ability to learn languages).

Unless the pastor just wanted to snub J-gov (which it does deserve, though).

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I wish them well, I hope Korea takes them

1 ( +3 / -2 )

South Korea have also been in Japan, headhunting nuclear engineers from TEPCO.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I must say I was a little more than surprised to read this at first! I wonder how the Japanese government feel about this? I wish nothing but the brightest future for all those touched by this terrible predicament. And by that I mean all of the poor souls who have lost so much and are now enduring so much up north. If anyone deserves some great luck and a better life, it's them.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

And don't laugh as this may not be a once off! one day all japanese may be nuclear radiation immigrants, begging foreign countries to pick them up if greed for nuclear energy is not curbed. And if Japanese are itching to permanently leave the country, what does this mean to the tourist industry? The last time I checked, other countries with less earthquake threatening environments such as Germany were putting deadlines to use of nuclear energy, while Japanese are holding the one hundredth meeting only to look into safety of nuclear energy, not even alternative sources of energy! The world is surprised at Japa's energy strategies after the fukushima incident.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

This seems rather odd to say the least.............are the Japanese looking into this of Korean decent or something where they might be able to better adapt to living in Korea???......

There are TONS of places to live in Japan, empty houses, lots fields EVERYWHERE, unless there is something to this that wasnt mentioned its pretty bizarre.

And heaven help these folks if their names ever became known they cud be in for a REAL back lash from other Japanese.

Pretty weird for sure.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Isn't it more accurate to say they seek emigration to South Korea? I didn't know it was correct to say you want to "immigrate" to somewhere else.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Yes, the wording is truly odd. I guess it might be impossible to emigrate from Japan for Japanese people according to Japanese Newspeak. However, the question whether they have Korean roots or not is left unanswered here, but might be helpful in understanding the choice. On the other hand, there is no other place in the world as similar to Japan as Korea (judging from climate and a few other things).

Maybe they will contribute to an improvement of JK relations. Emigration always means new hope and they might be just too frustrated with the Japanese government. Good luck to them!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Has someone told the good pastor that Korea has both nuclear plants and earthquakes?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Immigration from Fukushima. Emigration to South Korea.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

@GW perhaps the problem is the residents of the other prefectures don't want the Fukushima people or the real estate prices are much better in South Korea. Remember reading about children teasing/bullying children from Fukushima on JT?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@combinibento The residents are thinking of emigrating from Japan and immigrating into South Korea. It's correct to immigrate to somewhere else and emigrate out of a place.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

As GW says, relocation in Japan would be much easier. There was a group of French hippies that tried the same mega buzz last Summer. They proposed an empty middle of nowhere mountain village, with the houses and all inside (stove, fridge, super kitsch furniture...), that they'd let stay for free, even give food, stuff, raise money, for Fukushima families... A place where nobody lives, because there is nothing to do. They got one family : a gaijin that lived quite far from Fukushima ( Ishigaki or Rebun-to ?) with his Japanese kid. They were shown on French TV news as "the first nuclear refugees". Now they are probably back in Japan. Maybe the Dad reads this forum. Bien le bonjour, cher Monsieur.

several South Korean estate developers and said he was looking to buy land

Has the law changed ? I think foreigners were not allowed to own estate, so the Korean companies (or this Pastor's Church ) would own the lands and farms ? And people would be there as illegal aliens living as slaves ? employees on a work visa ? Or they'd be given refugee visas ? That would be surprising. North-Korea is more open to Japanese immigration, just hijack a plane and land there, they give you permanent residency and all the same rights (=zero) as any other comrade. But there are few candidates these days.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Immigration from Fukushima. Emigration to South Korea.

Emigration from Fukushima to South Korea. Immigration in South Korea.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

As this is a Pastor trying to make the arrangements then I assume his group are Christians. There is a much higher % of Christians in S Korea than in Japan so they will get a lot of support. I know several Christian Koreans and they are very committed.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Not weird. They are Christians. The Christian Koreans and Japanese are pretty close/friendly to each other.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Koreans DO NOT like Japanese for the most part.

Any Korean will treat the people of Fukushima better than Japanese are treating them now. Remember how they treat the hibakusha and their relatives?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Well, isn't that a kick in the teeth. Instead of looking for a similar place in Japan to live, they decide to leave the country altogether. Why, don't they trust their government to look after their interests?....silly question, of course not.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Good for them, I've been to Korea several times and the situtaion has improved markedly each time... yes there are still hardcore people who don't like Japan, but they are diminishing. I only hope they like Kimchee and garlic!! I do believe they really need to think this through and be sure bfore they commit. There are similarities between Japan and Korea, but also huge differences.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

All of this time, many Japanese people have complained about Korea, and now they want to go to Korea to live.

Did it ever occur to you that these people may never have complained about SK in their whole lives? When you open your mouth, does your neighbor's voice come out? My father agreed with and supported the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Do you think that means I do too? Japanese people are not joined at the head by ethernet cable. Some of them love many things Korean, such as their TV, food and personalities. Some are even proud to have South Korean friends. Through my extended Japanese family, I have a North Korean relative who also joined by marriage.

Bad enough you listen to haters. At least stop thinking they speak for us all.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

i cant believe this would be happened. a tention between J and SK people is getting worse and worse. anyway, it seems the source came from SEOUL so that means... nothing.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

The think the pastor is looking for a place withou nuclear, because he is convince that once the land is saturated with nuclear radiation it isn't good, for people to be living there. I don't know how old this pastor is, but my feeling is, that he was against nuclear energy from the getgo, he know once it starts it will only end bad, so therefore he and his people is getting out, while the going is good. He made a wise decision.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

There is a a lot of land in Shikoku that's similar to Fukushima.

I don't think it's only the similarity of agriculture, climate, and terrain as it is the support that he believes they will get by like-minded Christians.

Good luck to them all if this goes through. They've gone through hell as it is.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

After the simmering is done, this pastor will surely be strained.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

All of this time, many Japanese people have complained about Korea, and now they want to go to Korea to live.

"Did it ever occur to you that these people may never have complained about SK in their whole lives? When you open your mouth, does your neighbor's voice come out? My father agreed with and supported the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Do you think that means I do too? Japanese people are not joined at the head by ethernet cable. Some of them love many things Korean, such as their TV, food and personalities. Some are even proud to have South Korean friends. Through my extended Japanese family, I have a North Korean relative who also joined by marriage. Bad enough you listen to haters. At least stop thinking they speak for us all."

Wise words indeed and a breath of fresh air compared to the usual nonsense from the usual, seemingly professional, Japan haters who pollute this forum 24/7.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

This is utterly moronic. They want to live in a safe place that's free from the threat of radiation? Okay, then why move to a country that's technically still at war with a nuclear armed neighbor? Until re-unification is achieved on the Korean Peninsula, the risk factor of South Korea being on the receiving end of a nuclear and/or radiological attack will remain among the highest in the world.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

He is talking about "dozens", not hundreds or thousands. Why would they need to go to Korea? Japan can easily accommodate them. They would barely fill on carriage of a Tokyo-bound shink. There are vast tracts of underpopulated Japanese countryside where the land is dirt cheap. Send them over the mountatin to Yamagata. There is plenty of room in somewhere like Sakata.

Of course, this is not a government official, but a "pastor" who is obviously trying to spread The Word in some kind of rather unclear way.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Until re-unification is achieved on the Korean Peninsula, the risk factor of South Korea being on the receiving end of a nuclear and/or radiological attack will remain among the highest in the world.

I thought they had halted their nuclear program in exchange for a huge donation of food from the US.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

A reality check: South Korea produces over 30% of its power from nuclear. The pastor would be better moving to the South Seas.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I'm an American/Permanent Resident of South Korea who has also lived in Japan. I went to the website of Jangsu district in North Jeolla Province. I was surprised to find that the area is willing to welcome that group with open arms. They don't have to flee the country to find happiness and peace of mind, happiness comes from within, not from a location. That being said, I understand their desire for a fresh start. It won't be easy, when I first moved to Korea from Japan, I absolutely hated it. Over time, after learning the language and getting adjusted to the culture, Korea really grew on me and now I really enjoy my life here. It's not for everyone, but I think some of them will enjoy their new life here. As for Korea/Japan relations, Korean's still strongly dislike Japan, but that is mainly focused towards the Government and not it's people (maybe something the residents of Fukushima that are leaving have in common with their new neighbors). As for North Korea, I live 10 miles from the border. I would be lying if war with a large and hostile ground force just around the corner that threatens to turn my neighborhood into a "sea of fire" doesn't cross my mind from time to time, but it's very unlikely. There is a large U.S. military force in the country and besides, that province they would be moving to is not close to the border and wouldn't be a military target in the unlikely event of war. Kyushu is a good alternative for Fukushima residents as well. Good luck to them

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Given that the dateline is "Seoul", then "immigrate" is the right word. You can't "emigrate" into Korea. That said, it's a very small point and the focus should be on the poor folk involved. Good luck, wherever they decide to settle.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

wow !!!! well, i wish them luck. They can't trust the jaanese government. Very sad !!!!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Interesting to see where they will be more discriminated against, as Japanese, by and large, have no patience with serious Christians and, though they are Christians, will their S. Korean co-religionists overlook the fact that they are Japanese?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@ KoreaWandering

I'm glad they were accepted into S Korea. N Korea won't bomb the South I don't think So it's All Good.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Not sure they would feel safer. They will immigrate into a war zone. Second there is a lot of anti Japanese settlement in Korea. About being Christian, that would make them yet another minority. They may be welcome now but at the first sign of trouble will be turned into goats.

-5 ( +0 / -4 )

So much is unexplained in this interesting article: (1) Who initiated the idea (My guess is charitable Christian Koreans who had some link with the Fukushima church)? (2) Are many or most of these people ethnic Koreans (It seems a large percentage of many Christian churches in Japan are zainichi Korean citizens or descendants of Koreans who became naturalised Japanese)? (3) Have they looked into settling in rural areas of western Japan (Land and houses are unbelievably cheap, even by US standards)? (4) What is their answer to the obvious question about the rather tenuous "safety" of living next to wacko North Korea and in a small country with so many nuclear plants? (5) Are proper visas even a possibility? Answers anyone?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Anywhere is better, thanks to the devastation caused by one nuclear power plant.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This is definately a smart move, with the handling procedures like Mr Kan....who dares to stay? That pastor he is a 'saint'!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

it's not a big voice in Japan at all. He is weird. If he is really looking for a safe place why don't he just move to Osaka or somewhere.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I think people are missing the big picture here. This guy is a so-called "Christian" Pastor. Christianity is very big in Korea, he's making a power play to get his congregation to a place where he can get more followers and become more powerful.

I don't know what YURIOTANI is talking about, Christians are hardly a minority in KOREA. In Japan, yes.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

YuriOtaniMar. 07, 2012 - 02:16AM JST Not sure they would feel safer. They will immigrate into a war zone. . . .

S. Korea is potentially a war zone. It is not one currently.

They may be welcome now but at the first sign of trouble will be turned into goats.

Wow! I'd like to see that. Is this something the S. Koreans have been able to do for a while?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

A "Pastor" moving an entire congregation? Sounds like a cult.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Not going to church is fun, I did it!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Wanda-kun, there has never been a peace treaty signed. Unlike Japan and Russia it is very likely a war will break out.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

dude not korea

1 ( +1 / -0 )

agree with yuriotani-pon

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I am sure the North would happily take them.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

GW: As was touched on above in answer to your comment, Fukushima refugees are facing as much, if not worse, social stigma here as they would likely experience in South Korea. There WOULD of course be some racism here and there among individuals, but at least it wouldn't be coming from their own people. Also, the key point would be to go somewhere 'safe'. Heck, the way the government is acting in all this and with the future of Japan looking like it is, seems almost like a wise decision to me on a number of levels.

YuriOtani: They'd actually probably be more welcomed in some circles due to their Christian background, as SK has a MUCH larger Christian population.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If this story is actually true, " Fukushima residents" referred here is "zainichi Koreans"

0 ( +2 / -2 )

nigelboy

maybe your right. SK companies is working on making a japanese community town. http://www.nishinippon.co.jp/nnp/item/290275 however after k-ppl criticized about it the developer revealed actually its making for zainiti ppl.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

NO! not south korea. move to New Zealand.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If this story is actually true, " Fukushima residents" referred here is "zainichi Koreans"

Its quite possible. I just don't understand why had inject the summation with a pompous bigotted attitude.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I can't believe some of the hateful comments here about Korea or "Zainichi", when those people in Korea are willing to accept those Japanese who want to escape. But what did I expect?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

As some of the readers pointed out, Japanese Christians are quite different when it comes to their Asian neighbors. Nothing sinister - just that Christians here usually know more about WW2 history, are more reconciliatory, and just don't have the hate that many others seem to have towards other Asians.

I assume it's the same with other religious groups too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And this group from what I have read are in no way a cult. Just a close knit group who have travelled to different places thinking INITIALLY that they would be able to return.

And yes, the kids were bullied in the local schools they attended in various places. I imagine that lots of people from the Fukushima area will also have a hard time getting married in the future. Japanese can sometimes be pretty prejudiced towards their own people too.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

interesting how people reduce thing important thing to religion, when actually people are running away from radiation! where christian or not, the issue is that they are trying to run away from radiation and would be great if this thread focuses more on that.....

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I can't believe some of the hateful comments here about Korea or "Zainichi", when those people in Korea are willing to accept those Japanese who want to escape. But what did I expect?

Not Japanese. "Zainichi Koreans" as in Korean nationals living in Japan.

Unless of course Korean government considers Japanese nationals from Fukushima who evacuated as "refugee" status(LOL).

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Not sure they would feel safer. They will immigrate into a war zone. Second there is a lot of anti Japanese settlement in Korea. About being Christian, that would make them yet another minority. They may be welcome now but at the first sign of trouble will be turned into goats.

Maybe you should visit South Korea, Yuri. It is not a war zone and actually, Japanese tourists (yes, yes I know, these potential immigrants aren't tourists) are feted and catered to. And no, Christians make up nearly 1/3 of Korea's population.

I can't believe some of the hateful comments here about Korea or "Zainichi", when those people in Korea are willing to accept those Japanese who want to escape. But what did I expect?

If they're Korean nationals resident in Japan (what most Zainichi are), then it's a very different situation from ethnic Japanese nationals or even ethnic Koreans who have Japanese citizenship looking to move to Korea.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not Japanese. "Zainichi Koreans" as in Korean nationals living in Japan.

Unless of course Korean government considers Japanese nationals from Fukushima who evacuated as "refugee" status(LOL).

If they're Korean nationals resident in Japan (what most Zainichi are), then it's a very different situation from ethnic Japanese nationals or even ethnic Koreans who have Japanese citizenship looking to move to Korea.

Nobody knows who they are, yet people are 100% certain they are Zainichi".

You never know when Japan will need help someday. Who knows? The nuclear crisis may get worse and worse.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Nobody knows who they are, yet people are 100% certain they are Zainichi".

You never know when Japan will need help someday. Who knows? The nuclear crisis may get worse and worse.

I never said I was certain they were Zainichi, just that if they are, it is likely that many of them have South Korean citizenship, and if so, they're taking advantage of said citizenship to get away from the radiation (understandable), it's not the case that Japanese citizens are looking to move to South Korea.

You're hardly one to talk anyway, since you're not certain about Japan's manufacturing industry, yet you kept on insisting Korea had outstripped it.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Calling S. Korea a 'war zone' is like saying the Japanese government has been honest and forthright in dealing with the Fukushima situation. Obviously you have no idea what you're talking about.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I never said I was certain they were Zainichi, just that if they are, it is likely that many of them have South Korean citizenship, and if so, they're taking advantage of said citizenship to get away from the radiation (understandable), it's not the case that Japanese citizens are looking to move to South Korea.

And how do you know these are not "Japanese citizens looking to move to South Korea"?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

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