Koji Suzuki, 66, a surfer and a surf shop owner, holds his surfboard at Karasuzaki beach, around 30 kilometers north of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture. Photo: REUTERS/Akira Tomoshige
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Fukushima surfer, shop owner fears 'contaminated sea'

30 Comments
By Akira Tomoshige

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30 Comments
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And do they want to surf on those tetrapod beaches?

6 ( +8 / -2 )

I definitely do not want to be in a contaminated sea,

I definitely do not want to eat contaminated sea food, so please don't force us to buy and eat that using WTO.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

His fears are not justified. He faces much bigger dangers than the tiny amounts of a fairly benign isotope being diluted in the pacific ocean.

-8 ( +9 / -17 )

Is Fukushima prefecture a place for surfing ?

I didn’t know.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

There is no point in complaining about the release of tens of millions of tons of radioactive water. The bureaucratic J-Gov have made their decision based on economics. They are going as far as to tout the water as being safe to drink. The only thing that will stop this farce is if the US (big brother) object to the release. Japan will not pay any attention to objections from its neighboring countries. In fact, I’m quite sure they are pleased to antagonize their neighbors even more. There are alternatives to releasing the water, but pumping it into the ocean is the cheapest and easiest. The environmental impact is irrelevant to the J-gov bureaucrats.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

inevitable long term effect of a NUCLEAR DISASTER so not really a suprise

they can't keep storing water indefinitely so eventually it'll have to be dumped. This will continue for as long as the disaster continues, so 100 years or more. Depends if they can stop the pollution but they can't get to it.

This is what happens whey you continue to support the nuclear lobby

A likely end of their fishery, so tourism is going to go too

6 ( +7 / -1 )

So does anybody know what the stance on the contaminated water by the opposition parties?

October is around the corner and these policies can still be reversed if a different party is voted in.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I've never heard (treated water) tritium killed people as oceans already have tritium in there because many countries' reactors all over the world are discharging tritium into environment (sea, lake, river) for a long time. Tritium is not harmful isotopes (unlike cesium, strontium,,,). Tritium exists in nature, especially in minerals. It seems most Japanese have been eating all kinds of fish absorbing tritium for a long time but no one died from tritium. Conversely they have longest life.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Tritium is not the main issue here. It's the other dangerous isotopes that Japan failed to remove due to their failed equipment and poor technology.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Look if it was safe, America wouldn't have extended its ban on Fukushima products recently.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@kwatt

Tritium (3 H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen; it gives off radiation in the form of a beta particle. Tritium will bind anywhere hydrogen does, including in water, and in plant, animal and human tissue. It cannot be removed from the environment once it is released

As an isotope of hydrogen (the cell’s most ubiquitous element), tritium can be incorporated into essentially all portions of the living machinery; and it is not innocuous -- deaths have occurred in industry from occupational overexposure There is no evidence of a threshold for damage from 3 H exposure; even the smallest amount of tritium can have negative health impacts

5 ( +6 / -1 )

@Tom Doley

I did not say it is safe, I said not harmful. Why don't many Japanese die from tritium?

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

@kwatt

They don't die from Tritium they die from organ failure and that is what J-Gov report it as

5 ( +6 / -1 )

@Tom Doley

Need proof of tritium making organ failure. If you are right, IAEA will never admit discharging of tritium from all reactors all over the world into environment.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

What Japan is doing is wrong. There isn't really a viable argument against.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

An American ban on foods from 14 different areas and prefectures. Not just Fukushima.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@kwatt

Try taking a look at

NUCLEAR INFORMATION AND RESOURCE SERVICE 

And check out the following book:

Hori, TA and Nakai, S. Unusual Dose-Response of Chromosome Aberrations Induced in Human Lymphocytes by Very Low Dose Exposures to Tritium. Mutation Research. 50: 101-110. 1978

1 ( +1 / -0 )

With tritium, you may die of cancer, cells get rogue because of mutations due to radiations (beta particles), not from heavy radiation (alpha particles or gamma rays) when cells die because of direct hit.

All depends of the amount of radioactivity your body will sustain over time, measured in Sievert.

There is simply no other viable solution technically outside releasing such vast amount of radioactive water that carries on accumulating.

Best not to surf every day. But a few times, no worse than having x-rays with your doctor.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

smallest amount of tritium can have negative health impacts

It seems to me there are not only tritium but also billions of amount of such other substances against health around us. Tritium seems one of them.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

James - thank you for your useful information.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Does he think none of the radioactive substances have gone in the water in Fukushima ? Or there is no more radiation now ?

of course the water release is unacceptable and will make it worse than it is now. I don’t want anything from Fukushima until my first scheduled trip in 2600.

and why does Japan stil not hire foreign expert companies to help. This is not a good occasion for false pride

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Its not fear of? when the damage is already done! who knows what else they are not disclosing. Just like Japanese corporations. Real change only happens after strong independent foreign governance. Let outsiders in to oversee or observe what TEPCO is doing. Then maybe we can see the problem being solved and not just hidden.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

And do they want to surf on those tetrapod beaches?

Yes, the nuclear water release is far from the only ocean problem.

The sand at the beach in the photo looks pretty good, but it has tetrapod breakwaters and looks like it is next door to a regular coal-fired power plant, the Haramachi Karyoku Power Station. Some wind turbines too, but they wouldn't bother me.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

While I feel for this surfer & fishermen etc etc that fact is contaminated water IS repeat IS leaking into the ocean every single day & will continue for 100s of years, the contamination IS in the water table, the water cycle is UN STOPPABLE.

No solution is going to be good, that contaminated water is going to be release somewhere guaranteed!

The longer those tanks are being filled & sitting there the PROBLEM will remain!

It will all eventually be released one way or another, mother nature cannot be denied, she has time on her side, all man can do is delay or move it around but it WILL be RELEASED somewhere, sometime.

I get no joy typing the above but to think otherwise is simply false hope

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@GW

There are other ways to dispose of it releasing it is the cheapest and fastest way that is why they want to do it.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Humans have contaminated every beautiful sea with the plastics. The monsters have made the decison of pouring contaminated water into the sea. It's just not the J-Gov. No difference there.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The guy (who says he surfs at a different beach further north) is concerned about what future potential visitors to the area might think. (See last five paragraphs.)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@backpackingin, you could also talk about various places around the world like India they dump thousends of raw sewage into the ocean every day, some countries cut up old steel ships right on the beaches, so god knows what contaminates are washed back into the sea, some under developed countries are doing the same, ie dumping contaminates from industry, and I bet China is not helping to, then there is the whole plastic issue.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Suzuki said he knows the government insists the treated water will be safe, but he is concerned others may not think so.

So what did he actually say? Does he believe what the government says? If he uses a beach further north, does he actually think the sea is contaminated? Or is what bothers him the perception, that may damage kill his business, or does he want the contamination to stop?

As with so many of these articles on Fukushima, the focus is all on the perception, the look, not the reality, but with the mish mash editing, or rubbish translation from Japanese, it's hard to know if this is what people actually argued, or whether they care about or trust the government's reporting. Also disappointing is the lack of any back up reporting referring to actual data about readings.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Jonathan PrinApr. 18  09:46 am JST

With tritium, you may die of cancer, cells get rogue because of mutations due to radiations (beta particles), not from heavy radiation (alpha particles or gamma rays) when cells die because of direct hit.

All depends of the amount of radioactivity your body will sustain over time, measured in Sievert.

There is simply no other viable solution technically outside releasing such vast amount of radioactive water that carries on accumulating.

Best not to surf every day. But a few times, no worse than having x-rays with your doctor.

Maybe so but for this guy surfing is fun, it's his passon. He's a Beach Boy. And he has every right to be concerned. It can hurt his business, not to mention himself. And as for 'not surfing every day', it's a crime that he can't have as much fun because of a bunch of irresponsible idiots spoiling the environment. Tritium is not something to dismiss as 'nothing'.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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