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Gov't kicks off Warm Biz energy-saving campaign

36 Comments

The Japanese government on Monday kicked off its annual Warm Biz energy-saving campaign by encouraging people to dress warmly.

However, much of Japan is yet to experience cold temperatures. In Tokyo on Monday, the forecast high was 22 degrees. Staff at the environment ministry could be seen wearing sweaters and some women had blankets on their laps.

Each year, as part of the campaign, the Environment Ministry calls on offices and homes to set heaters and air conditioners no higher than 20 degrees C and keep warm the "old-fashioned way” by wearing extra layers of clothes and eating hot meals to keep out the cold. In the colder months of January and February, the ministry suggests using scarves, gloves, stomach warmers, and leg warmers or two pairs of socks during the day.

For dinner, it recommends a traditional Japanese hotpot. "You can lower the heat if you enjoy nabe, making both your body and the room warm. The temperature will feel higher than it actually is thanks to steam from the pot," the ministry says.

Eating root vegetables and ginger will help to "warm the body up," it says, adding that getting off the train a stop earlier and walking the rest of the way to work will boost circulation.

Warm Biz was first introduced in 2005 as a follow-up to the Cool Biz campaign during the summer. But it didn't really get much attention until 2011 when the government began promoting it heavily due to fears over a potential electricity shortfall following the March 11 disaster.

The Warm Biz campaign runs through next March 31.

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36 Comments
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How about bringing in laws that force builders to insulate every home and workplace they build.

22 ( +23 / -1 )

So we pay our taxes to get our grandmas reccomendations like this one

“Eating root vegetables and ginger will help to "warm the body up”

How ingenious are these J-politicians at the helm,besides such rustican remedies it would be nicer from them to spend more of these taxpayers to the environment and climate change.

14 ( +14 / -0 )

".... it recommends a traditional Japanese hotpot."

The actual energy savings achieved by the efforts of the Environment Ministry are less than the amount of energy used to heat and air-condition their offices.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

An American friend visiting a Japanese house in winter found a portable kerosene heater. He looked at it curiously. He did not know Japanese people move the heater from one room to the other to save oil and money. Central heating is the norm in America.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

keep warm the "old-fashioned way” by wearing extra layers of clothes and eating hot meals to keep out the cold

Why does a government need to treat its adult population like children? JT shows us the man children that live in this country but aren't they the exception to the rule?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

In the colder months of January and February, the ministry suggests using scarves, gloves, stomach warmers, and leg warmers or two pairs of socks during the day.

Ah, life in the exotic Orient. Would the Ministry like me to slap on some goose fat too? Hasn't the wizadry of UPVC windows made it over here yet? My windows look as though they were made by a plumber.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I pray to sweet, gentle kamisama that they turn off the heaters on the trains, at least during peak hours. It’s an effing sauna every year.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

This is a great idea: Dress warm in the winter!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

But the office and shopping buildings will still blast the heating. Hot all year round....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

How about bringing in laws that force builders to insulate every home and workplace they build.

Eeehhhh? Bringing change to Japan? How many millennia of meetings and pre-meeting meetings might that require? After that, enacting a law that is not compulsory, but merely a suggestion (so as not to impinge on the rights enshrined in the Constitution).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

My new favourite source for cheap winter clothing is the overalls store, Workman. They do a half-zip grid fleece top that is like Patagonia or TNF but 1/10 of the price. It has thumb loops, so the sleeves are designed extra long, thereby avoiding the main problem with Japanese clothes for me. Grid fleece is a great material, warm but with variable thickness (in a grid) that makes it breathable.

Uniqlo's heat tech is designed as underwear to be hidden and the sleeves are 9/10ths of Japanese length, which is short to begin with. Workman's thermals are a tiny bit longer, but still too short for me. I like the packable thin down jacket Uniqlo make though, the Ultra Light Down. It's versatile and good value for 5000 yen.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

How about "Carbon monoxide and kerosene fumes-Biz"...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The traditional Western business attire of suit, vest, and tie and women dressing in layers-upon-layers were a product of the days before central heating. Unless you were near a fireplace, it was darn cold. Warm clothing works well, and modern fabrics are much less bulky.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Waste of time. As usual.

Hey, it's cold. Dress warmly! Hey, it's hot. Drink cold drinks.

Look, just DON'T blast the heaters in public areas when it's BARELY chilly and everything will be fine.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Eating root vegetables and ginger will help to "warm the body up," it says, adding that getting off the train a stop earlier and walking the rest of the way to work will boost circulation.

Good to see the government giving some healthy tips of how to keep the imune system up, unlike most other governments that barely mention this important point.

Along with these, it would be good to see the government keeping the heaters off during peak hours at stations and trains, as this makes people sick, sweating in jammed trains and then going out to - soon - very low temperatures.

Lastly, please keep the train windows open all winter, to avoid unnecessary influenza and covid outbreaks.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

Uniqlo's HEATTECH underwear works well at least for me staying outside in a cold day. HEATTECH is my favorite brand, but there must be some equivalents you can get for an inexpensive price.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

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